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John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 179 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 85 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 65 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 47 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 46 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 45 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for Cheatham or search for Cheatham in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 5 document sections:

The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
Corps, occupied Rome, capturing a large amount of commissary and quartermaster stores, hospital supplies, &c., and all sorts of ammunition, enough to supply his command for two weeks. The enemy tried to destroy the valuable iron-works at this place, but failed to do them much injury. Howard's troops entered Kingston about 8 a. m. on the 19th, skirmishing with the enemy on the southeastern side of the town. The column started again about 11 a. m. and came up with what was reported to be Cheatham's and another division in line of battle on a hill about half way between Kingston and Cassville. Howard's troops shelled the enemy from this position, pushing on after him to within two miles of Cassville, skirmishing with his rear guard until dark, when the command halted for the night. Baird's division, of Palmer's corps, was posted on the right of Howard's corps. Hooker's troops engaged the enemy on the road, leading direct from Adairsville to Cassville, skirmishing with him and driv
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
h Tree and Pea Vine Creeks, evidently aiming at the bridge. I had fortunately kept two guns of Goodspeed's battery in the rear, on the road, at the angle of the works vacated by General Wood. With these guns, which I put into position, and a few of the pickets who had been driven in alongside of them, this column of Bate's was checked and driven back into the woods. At the same time Walker's (rebel) division attacked my left and center, and almost immediately after another heavy column (Cheatham's, I think) attacked Kimball's right, which at this time was 500 or 600 yards in the advance of General Hooker's line of battle. A portion of the enemy passing around Kimball's right, he was compelled to take a regiment from his line of battle and form against them, this regiment, firing into their flank, dispersing them and driving them off to the right. On the left of Blake's brigade the enemy's column succeeded in getting around his flank. Colonel Lane, Ninety-seventh Ohio Volunteer I
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
ed where they fell. Had the enemy recovered possession of the hill on which Colonel Blake's and my own brigades were posted, he would have been able to command the plain over which the left of the Twentieth Corps was moving and to enfilade the position to be taken by it, and the desperate efforts made by him to retake the hill are indicated by the loss of many officers of high rank in close proximity to our lines. The troops which attacked our position were Bate's, Walker's, and a part of Cheatham's divisions, esteemed among the best in the rebel service, and prisoners relate that no doubt whatever was felt that we would be swept from the ridge by their superior numbers, or, remaining, would be easily captured by their turning our left and cutting us off from the crossing of the Peach Tree Creek. During the night succeeding the action the enemy was actively engaged with a large force removing his dead and wounded from such parts of the field near our lines as he could approach in th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 143 (search)
lling or wounding of those who attempted to go to their relief. In the engagement I lost 3 officers killed and 3 wounded, 15 non-commissioned officers and privates killed and 123 wounded. Two of them, who were wounded in the outside ditch of the enemy's works, were captured. The loss was a severe one to my command. How much we damaged the enemy I do not know, but my opinion is their loss was small, as they fought behind heavy earth-works. We fought the flower of the Southern army, being Cheatham's division, of Hardee's corps. We succeeded in making a lodgment so close up to their works as to compel them to evacuate four days afterward. On the night of the 28th the enemy, growing uneasy about the tenacity with which we held on to our position so close to their works, charged us and attempted to drive us away. We repulsed him with the small loss of 5 men wounded. On the night of the 2d of July the enemy, having discovered that we were building a new parallel still closer to his l
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
e in front of Harker; that Loring's, Walker's, and Cheatham's divisions were on summit of ridge, extending froeared to be cavalry and infantry. Citizens report Cheatham's division to be there. They opened six guns uponheld, as we afterward found out from prisoners, by Cheatham's and Cleburne's divisions, of Hardee's corps. Ons rear and left flank, and Walker's his front, and Cheatham's division came around his right. 11 a. m., Genered. The reconnaissance demonstrated that three of Cheatham's brigades are in our front, and prisoners report that Cleburne's division is on Cheatham's right. There are also, in addition to these old troops, plenty of mmy's demonstration was made by Maney's brigade, of Cheatham's division; that this brigade is posted south of t enemy's infantry rests; that Strahl's brigade, of Cheatham's division, is on their right, and on the right of our lines from Manev's and Vaughan's brigades, of Cheatham's division. They report that at noon yesterday th