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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 166 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 114 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 91 9 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 78 2 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 77 7 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 45 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for Hardee or search for Hardee in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 9 document sections:

The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
emy lay in and about Dalton, superior to me in cavalry (Wheeler's), and with three corps of infantry and artillery, viz : Hardee's, Hood's, and Polk's, the whole commanded by General Joe Johnston, of the Confederate Army. I estimated the cavalry undsen, more especially the hill gained by General Leggett the night before. Already the whole line was engaged in battle. Hardee's corps had sallied from Atlanta, and by a wide circuit to the east had struck General Blair's left flank, enveloped it, eenth Corps across from the railroad to occupy this gap. It came across on the double-quick and checked the enemy. While Hardee attacked in flank, Stewart's corps was to attack in front directly out from the main works, but fortunately their attacksneral Howard was admirably situated to receive him and repulsed the attack thoroughly. The enemy attacked with Lee's and Hardee's corps, and after a contest of over two hours withdrew, leaving over 400 dead on the ground, and his wounded, of which a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
division of cavalry, with instructions from General Johnston to observe our movements toward Burnt Hickory, and stating that Johnston was moving in the direction of Dallas and Powder Springs. General Garrard, commanding Second Cavalry Division, informed me that he was camped on Pumpkin Vine Creek, about three miles from Dallas, and that in moving on that place, and when within a quarter of a mile from it, he was attacked by what was reported by prisoners to be Bate's division, the advance of Hardee's corps. Garrard repulsed this force and drove it back toward Dallas. On the 25th the First Division of Cavalry (McCook's) moved on the road leading to Golgotha, preceding Butterfield's division, of the Twentieth Corps. The balance of General Hooker's command advanced on the road leading to Dallas running south of the one used by Butterfield's division. Howard's corps followed Hooker's, and in rear of Howard, Palmer's. About 11 a. m. General Geary's division, of the Twentieth Corps, b
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
done. Very early in the night the enemy retreated. The formation and advance of the troops of Kimball's and Newton's divisions was done under a severe cannonade, and, although the men were perfectly cool and behaved well, I have no doubt but this delayed the deployment. Just before dark General Davis sent me word that he had positive information that we were on their flank, which was the [first] intimation I had of the position of the enemy. No one regrets more than myself the escape of Hardee's corps, and it is easy after the facts are revealed to see how he might have been caught; but the position of the enemy was entirely unknown to me and had to be developed, and the time necessary to overcome the difficulties brought us to night, and with night the opportunity for the enemy to escape. I carried out all orders and instructions received without delay, and when the enemy was found used all the personal exertions in my power to push the troops rapidly forward. I believe the sub
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
lumber revetments for artillery and riflemen. Keeping a heavy line of skirmishers forward, the enemy opened from Pine Mountain with artillery. Remained in this position, with severe skirmishing, the 12th, 13th, and 14th of June. On the 14th a shell from the Fifth Indiana Battery, commanded by Lieutenant Morrison, fired from a 3-inch Rodman gun, from the section commanded by Lieutenant Ellison, killed Lieutenant-General Polk of the rebel army, who, in company with Generals Johnston and Hardee, was surveying our lines from Pine Mountain. June 15, the rebels vacated Pine Mountain and its strong defenses. We advanced in pursuit and occupied Pine Mountain. We found the enemy in another line of works in cannon-range of his last position. In this advance I suffered the loss of that good and brave officer, Lieut. Thomas M. Gunn, topographical engineer of the brigade, who was captured by the enemy while fearlessly in the discharge of his duty. We remained before the enemy, with heavy
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
tion of this last line of his rail communications must inevitably compel the enemy to evacuate Atlanta. Wednesday, the 31st, my division, leading the Fourth Corps, and in conjunction with a division of the Twenty-third Corps, made a strong lodgment on the Macon railroad. Early Thursday morning, September 1, the work of destroying the road was commenced, but it was soon discontinued, by an order to move by the Griffin road in the direction of Jonesborough. It was understood that two corps (Hardee's and Lee's) of the rebel army were concentrated there. My division being in reserve for the day and in charge of the trains of the corps, did not reach Jonesborough till nearly night-fall, and of course had no opportunity to take part in the engagement which occurred there late in the afternoon. Arriving near the field a little before night-fall, I was ordered to mass my division in rear of the First and Second Divisions of the corps, which deployed in order of battle, and just then beco
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
ry crossed the Coosa River and marched with their divisions to Adairsville, when, on May 17, the Sixth Ohio Light Battery was placed in position near the Adairsville and Resaca road, and Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, was placed in position one mile to the right and front on General Wood's division front, each doing good execution. May 20, the Fifth Indiana Light Battery, Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, and the Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Battery were engaged with General Hardee's corps, C. S. Army. The corps camped near Cassville three days, at which place Lieut. George W. Freeman, inspector of artillery and ordnance officer, and acting chief of artillery, was relieved by reason of the expiration of his term of service, and I was appointed, by order of Major-General Howard, acting chief of artillery in the absence of Maj. T. W. Osborn, absent 31 R R-Vol XXXVIII, Pt I wounded. May 23, the corps moved to Dallas via Euharlee and Raccoon Creek and Pumpkin Vine C
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
unication with General McPherson's command. Taking the Burnt Hickory road and passing over Bishop's Bridge, across Pumpkin Vine Creek, two miles from Dallas, the advance of Morgan's brigade drove in the enemy's pickets and pushed into the town. The whole division followed and formed line of battle on the East Marietta road. The head of General Mc-Pherson's column arrived at this time and went into position, his lines running across the Villa Rica road. Skirmishers ordered out soon found Hardee's corps intrenched in a strong position, covering the Marietta and Villa Rica roads, his right resting on the west end of Ellisberry Mountain. During the night the troops erected temporary breast-works, and early on the morning of the 27th I ordered McCook's brigade to advance about a mile into a gorge in the mountain, through which a road passes connecting the two roads leading from Dallas to Marietta. A regiment deployed as skirmishers, after some hard fighting, discovered a brigade o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 143 (search)
ose who attempted to go to their relief. In the engagement I lost 3 officers killed and 3 wounded, 15 non-commissioned officers and privates killed and 123 wounded. Two of them, who were wounded in the outside ditch of the enemy's works, were captured. The loss was a severe one to my command. How much we damaged the enemy I do not know, but my opinion is their loss was small, as they fought behind heavy earth-works. We fought the flower of the Southern army, being Cheatham's division, of Hardee's corps. We succeeded in making a lodgment so close up to their works as to compel them to evacuate four days afterward. On the night of the 28th the enemy, growing uneasy about the tenacity with which we held on to our position so close to their works, charged us and attempted to drive us away. We repulsed him with the small loss of 5 men wounded. On the night of the 2d of July the enemy, having discovered that we were building a new parallel still closer to his lines, evacuated all his
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
ky Face Ridge. The rebels are going to fight, and in good spirits. Hood's and Hardee's corps in the valley. Loring's division has come from Rome; seven divisions bht to daylight; that Polk's corps moved on the road upon which we are marching, Hardee's on the road to our right, and Hood's on the road to our left. 4.30, heard he afterward found out from prisoners, by Cheatham's and Cleburne's divisions, of Hardee's corps. On the first crest of the hill, in some places just below it, we tookack to a ridge a short distance from the river. Prisoners taken, who were from Hardee's corps, state that the main part of Johnston's army is about one mile or two mured 35 prisoners, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 1 captain, and 2 lieutenants, all from Hardee's corps. Our losses in killed and wounded very small for the work done and resetween the point where we struck it and Jonesborough at 5 this p. m. later.-Hardee's and Lee's corps (of Hood's army) assaulted General Howard (Army of the Tennes