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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
eneral Sherman at Savannah-his army entirely foot-loose, Hood being then before Nashville, Tenn., the Southern railroads destroyed, so that it would take several months to re-establish a through line from west to east, and regarding the capture of Lee's army as the most important operation toward closing the rebellion — I sent orders to General Sherman, on the 6th of December, that after establishing a base on the sea-coast, with necessary garrison, to include all his artillery and cavalry, to man, toward Lynchburg-and assembling the remainder of his available forces preparatory to offensive operations from East Tennessee; General Sheridan's cavalry was at White House; the Armies of the Potomac and James were confronting the enemy under Lee in his defenses of Richmond and Petersburg; General Sherman with his armies, re-enforced by that of General Schofield, was at Goldsborough; General Pope was making preparations for a spring campaign against the enemy under Kirby Smith and Price, w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
and Ready, and then to send forward due east a strong detachment of General Davis' corps to feel for the railroad. General Schofield was also ordered to move boldly forward and strike the railroad near Rough and Ready. These movements were progressing during the 31st, when the enemy came out of his works at Jonesborough and attacked General Howard in position, as described. General Howard was admirably situated to receive him and repulsed the attack thoroughly. The enemy attacked with Lee's and Hardee's corps, and after a contest of over two hours withdrew, leaving over 400 dead on the ground, and his wounded, of which about 300 were left in Jonesborough, could not have been much less than 2,500. Hearing the sounds of battle at Jonesborough about noon, orders were renewed to push the other movements on the left and center, and about 4 p. m. the reports arrived simultaneously that General Howard had thoroughly repulsed the enemy at Jonesborough; that General Schofield had reac
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
rs Army of the Cumberland, In the Field, near Dallas, Ga., June 5, 1864. Colonel: I have the honor to report the operations of my command for the month of May as follows: In obedience to instructions from the major-general commanding the military division, I got my command in readiness for a forward movement on Dalt on, Ga., and was fully prepared to move on the 2d of May, as directed. Major-General Hooker, commanding Twentieth Army Corps, was directed to move from Lookout Valley, via Lee and Gordon's Mills, on East Chickamauga Creek, to Leet's farm, on the road leading from the mills to Nickajack Gap, the movement to commence on the 2d. Major-General Palmer, commanding the Fourteenth Army Corps, was to concentrate his command at Ringgold, Ga., and Major-General Howard, commanding the Fourth Army Corps, was to move from Cleveland, East Tennessee, on the 3d, and concentrate his command in the vicinity of Catoosa Springs, about three miles east of Ringgold; McCook's division of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
its camp at Blue Springs, under orders to move to Catoosa Springs. The division took the main road to Dalton, and encamped the same night one mile south of Red Clay. Marching early the next morning, we reached Catoosa Springs at noon, near Dr. Lee's house. General McCook's cavalry, which was in advance of the infantry, exchanged shots with the rebel pickets, who ran away in the direction of Tunnel Hill. We remained in camp the 5th and 6th, and on the morning of the?th marched for Tunnel Hill, this division leading. After passing Dr. Lee's house the main road leading down the base of Rocky Face was taken. Skirmishers were deployed, and the enemy's skirmishers were soon encountered. We found the road obstructed by fallen trees, but all difficulties were soon overcome, and we soon found ourselves in sight of the enemy's intrenchments upon Tunnel Hill. As the force of the enemy was entirely uncertain, Brigadier-General Cruft, with the First Brigade, was directed to attack the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 38 (search)
e by my regimental commanders. Lieutenant Jackson, acting assistant adjutant-general, deserves official mention for devotion, efficiency, and gallantry. Lieutenant Thomson was efficient with the pioneers. My losses were: Killed, 1 officer and 7 men; wounded, 4 officers and 29 men; missing, 2 men; prisoners, 1 officer and 13 men; aggregate, 57. We captured 33 prisoners, one of them a surgeon. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Emerson Opdycke, Colonel, Commanding. Capt. George Lee, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Division, Fourth Army Corps. Addenda. Hdqrs. First Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, hNear Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to report the following statement of casualties for the month of August, 1864: Zzz Received during the month 15 rebel deserters. Respectfully, your obedient servant, A. C. McMURTRY, Lieutenant and Provost-Marshal. Hdqrs. First Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., Se
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
ly, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. George Lee, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., Fourth Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Brig., ly, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. George Lee, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., Fourth Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Brig., ly, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. George Lee, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., Fourth7 Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Brig.ly, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. George Lee, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., Fourth Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Brig., ly, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding, Capt. George Lee, Asst. Adjt. Geen., Second Div., Fourth Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Brig.zz Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. George Lee, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., Fourth Army Corps
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
e one of its disasters. No more gallant soldier has fallen in the war. Conspicuous for gentleness and generosity as well as courage, he won the confidence and respect of all who knew him, and was everywhere recognized as a true gentleman and soldier. I desire to return my thanks to the officers of the brigade for their ready and cheerful performance of duty during the late arduous campaign, and especially to Colonel Opdycke, of the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio, for the very gallant and skillful manner in which he has performed the various duties devolving upon him since the opening of the campaign. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, L. P. Bradley, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. George Lee, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., Fourth Army Corps. Inclosure. Report of casualties during the recent campaign, commencing May 3 and ending September 7, 1864. Zzz Hdqrs. Third Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 13, 1864.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
last line of his rail communications must inevitably compel the enemy to evacuate Atlanta. Wednesday, the 31st, my division, leading the Fourth Corps, and in conjunction with a division of the Twenty-third Corps, made a strong lodgment on the Macon railroad. Early Thursday morning, September 1, the work of destroying the road was commenced, but it was soon discontinued, by an order to move by the Griffin road in the direction of Jonesborough. It was understood that two corps (Hardee's and Lee's) of the rebel army were concentrated there. My division being in reserve for the day and in charge of the trains of the corps, did not reach Jonesborough till nearly night-fall, and of course had no opportunity to take part in the engagement which occurred there late in the afternoon. Arriving near the field a little before night-fall, I was ordered to mass my division in rear of the First and Second Divisions of the corps, which deployed in order of battle, and just then becoming slight
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
e purpose of bringing forward transportation when obtained. Transportation overtook the division on the 26th of May. The regiment for some time after was kept with the train as guard, &c. It reported to its brigade for duty on the 20th day of July. On the morning of the 2d of May, in compliance with orders, Morgan's and Mitchell's brigades and the batteries marched to Ringgold, Ga., and went into camp on the East Chickamauga Creek. On the morning of the 3d McCook's brigade marched from Lee and Gordon's Mills, and joined the division at Ringgold. On the morning of the 5th the division passed through the gap at Ringgold, and went into bivouac near the stone church, at the forks of the Dalton and Cleveland roads. The enemy's pickets were encountered by Morgan's skirmishers in small force. On the morning of the 7th the advance of the army was assigned to my division, and at daylight McCook's brigade, followed by the rest of my command, moved on the direct road to Tunnel Hill. Th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 128 (search)
ain that distance to the left and the rebels to retake it before my front line reached the works, is difficult to understand. The flag claimed to have been taken is a misstatement. This flag was taken by an officer from the parapet long after the works had been carried and when my command was actually turning the works with pick and spade by my order. This can be proven by Major McDonald and many others of the Sixtieth Illinois. In my report I said nothing about the formal surrender of Major Lee and officers and men of the Sixth Kentucky to Captain Dunphy, of the Tenth Michigan Infantry, and turned over by him to a provost-marshal of the Third Division, being desirous that all should participate in the credit of this most successful charge; neither did I think it necessary to report that all of Colonel Este's command, that had carried the enemy's works previous to my second line coming to their relief, were held as prisoners, as will appear from brigade and regimental reports, to
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