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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
ive his men rest and get up stores until the 17th of July, when he resumed his operations, crossed the Chattahoochee, destroyed a large portion of the railroad to Augusta, and drove the enemy back to Atlanta. At this place General Hood succeeded General Johnston in command of the rebel army, and, assuming the offensive-defensive pd send a force to get Columbus, Ga., either by the way of the Alabama or Apalachicola, and that I keep Hood employed and put my army in final order for a march on Augusta, Columbia, and Charleston, to be ready as soon as Wilmington is sealed as to commerce and the city of Savannah is in our possession. This was in reply to a leented to that Sherman should start for the sea-coast. Having concentrated his troops at Atlanta by the 14th of November, he commenced his march, threatening both Augusta and Macon. His coming out point could not be definitely fixed. Having to gather his subsistence as he marched through the country, it was not impossible that a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
rch by Cross Keys; and General McPherson to direct his course from Roswell straight against the Augusta road at some point east of Decatur near Stone Mountain. General Garrard's cavalry acted with Geo state that the day before I had detached General Garrard's cavalry to go to Covington, on the Augusta road, forty-two miles east of Atlanta, and from that point to send detachments to break the t but two men, one of whom was killed by accident. Having, therefore, sufficiently crippled the Augusta road, and rendered it useless to the enemy, I then addressed myself to the task of reaching theine, and to shift by the right below Proctor's Creek, and General Schofield to extend up to the Augusta road. About the same time General Rousseau had arrived from his expedition to Opelika, bringinhe enemy across the Chattahoochee River. The crossing of the Chattahoochee and breaking of the Augusta road was most handsomely executed by us, and will be studied as an example in the art of war. A
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 19 (search)
my command my front and our left flank. Nothing of importance occurred until the 18th, when, by your order, a strong demonstration was made by me at an early hour in the morning. The enemy answered with artillery, doing, however, no damage. The Twentyfirst Illinois Infantry, of the First Brigade (Colonel Kirby), lost 5 men captured on the skirmish line. Nothing new was developed in relation to the enemy. On the morning of the 19th I was ordered by him to make a reconnaissance down the Augusta road toward the enemy's line, and sending out the First Brigade (Colonel Kirby) at 3 a. m., drove the enemy back, with sharp skirmishing, to their main line of works. After coming within close rifle range of the enemy's intrenchments Colonel Kirby retired, and returned to his position. A noble and worthy officer, Captain Rains, of the Ninetieth Ohio, was killed. No others injured. On the 20th, at 3 o'clock, I sent the Third Brigade (General Grose) on a reconnaissance to the left of rai
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
were sent up in the enemy's lines, apparently opposite General Newton's division, and about twenty minutes afterward others were sent up, and then a bright fire was kindled in the southern part of the town. It is supposed that the enemy is making some movement. 3 a. m., started from headquarters for the left. General Kimball made the movements, in accordance with the orders given to him.at 8 p. m. last night. At daybreak Kirby's brigade was moved to the point indicated on the railroad (Augusta and Atlanta road) and he (Kirby) sent strong reconnoitering parties toward Atlanta, and south toward the battle-field of the 22d of July, where the Seventeenth Corps fought. 5 a. m., the lookout in front of Kimball's division discovered a body of the enemy's troops, a division in strength, moving double-quick from Atlanta toward the position held by Kirby. These troops went into their works, opposite Kirby's brigade, as posted on the railroad. At daybreak Colonel Taylor sent a regiment t