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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 456 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 154 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 72 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 54 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 38 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Delaware (Delaware, United States) or search for Delaware (Delaware, United States) in all documents.

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lantation-visit to West Point. The friendship between the Davis family and my own began about this time. My grandfather, Major Richard Howell, was born in Delaware. For some of these particulars I am indebted to my friend and cousin, General Meredith Read, of the United States Army, who is too much esteemed and too widely is great-grandfather was a Howell of Caerleon, Monmouth County. One of the sons moved to Caerphilly, Glamorganshire, Wales, where he was seated until he moved to Delaware about 1690, and became a large planter there. One of his daughters married Colonel John Read, the signer. Richard, the father of William B. Howell, was a practforces among the first and raised a company. He eventually became major of a regiment. Major Richard Howell, of the New Jersey Continental line, was born in Delaware, in 1753. He first signalled his patriotism in November, 1774, by assisting in destroying the tea landed by the Greyhound, at Greenwich, N. J. In 1775, Rich
sentimental view of duty, or allegiance. He conscientiously examined the Constitution of the Union as the conservator, guarantee, and limitation of his rights, and honorably abided by its authority. Throughout this memorable session antislavery petitions were adopted by the leaders of the movement in the North to force the discussions of the slavery question into Congress. Early in February, a motion was made by Senator Hale, of New Hampshire, to receive a petition from inhabitants of Delaware and Pennsylvania, praying for the immediate and peaceful dissolution of the Union. Up to this date it had been the uniform practice to lay on the table without debate all resolutions relating to the slavery agitation. But on this occasion a spirited debate followed Senator Hale's motion. Mr. Davis took part. He said: I rise merely to make a few remarks on the right of petition . . . It is offensive to recommend legislation for the dissolution of the Union; offensive to the Senate a
rls to the North. The people of the two sections are not the same people, but are the complement of each other, and their extreme opinions would have thus been modified by the education of each in the other's sphere. In Baltimore. June 18th, the convention met again with General Cushing again in the chair. Everyone who could find standing room went from the adjacent cities. It put one in mind of the old Scotch song, O little wot ye wha's coming. New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Ohio, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, South Carolina, North Carolina-indeed, the anxious, thoughtful men from all the States poured in with propositions of pacification. They talked in groups of twos and threes in subdued tones, and listened to the proceedings of the convention as to their doom. In the galleries there were extraordinary scenes and by-plays. A Western lady was criticising most severely the South and all things Southern, when an old man, who was supposed to be a