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rifice so gladly made by individuals in the Confederacy. In this year the Church and the world sustained a great loss in the death of Bishop Meade. He had been General Lee's preceptor, and when the General went to see him, he called him in the old simple way: Robert, come near that I may bless you. He left a message for the Confederate people. Tell your people to be more determined than ever. This is the most unjust and iniquitous war that was ever waged. He was buried from St. Paul's Church, and followed by a multitude of sincere mourners. In these days of self-sacrifice and dumb suffering many things were endured which should exalt the name of Confederates. The burning of all the cotton in the country was a stupendous sacrifice, and there is probably no man who remembers it now well enough to state the facts. Generally it was burned by the owner, but in a few cases the Government agent was charged with the duty. The following is the form of certificate given fo
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 58: the President's account of the evacuation of Richmond. (search)
Chapter 58: the President's account of the evacuation of Richmond. I give Mr. Davis's story of the evacuation of Richmond in his own words. On Sunday, April 2d, while I was in St. Paul's Church, General Lee's telegram announcing his speedy withdrawal from Petersburg and the consequent necessity for evacuating Richmond, was handed me. I quietly left the church. The occurrence probably attracted attention, but the people had been beleaguered, had known me too often to receive notice of threatened attacks, and the congregation of St. Paul's was too refined, to make a scene at anticipated danger. I went to my office and assembled the heads of departments and bureaus, as far as they could be found on a day when all the offices were closed, and gave the needful instruction for our removal that night, simultaneously with General Lee's from Petersburg. The event was foreseen, and some preparations had been made for it, though, as it came sooner than was expected, there was yet