Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Custis Lee or search for Custis Lee in all documents.

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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 53: battle of Drury's Bluff, May 16, 1864. (search)
the night the clerks and citizens, under General Custis Lee, had spread a thin line along part of thith pleasure under the immediate command of General Lee, aiding him to crush our enemies, and to acder any general who ranks him. The right of General Lee to command would be derived from his superig that he should be heavily reinforced from General Lee's army, so as to enable him to crush Butlerurg, and place the capital in jeopardy. If General Lee will fall back behind the Chickahominy, engregard to return, with a reinforcement from General Lee, to drive Butler from before Petersburg, anpresented is one of starvation. Without it General Lee must eventually fall back before Grant's heent, and is referred to you for attention. General Lee is best informed of his situation, and his General Lee. If that be done immediately, General Lee's correspondence warrants the belief that hquired that the memoranda should be sent to General Lee, who, as soon as its purport was communicat[3 more...]
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 44: the lack of food and the prices in the Confederacy. (search)
ith gun blacking. Shoes, $125 to $150. Ink was made of elderberries; flour cost $300 a barrel. February 10, 1863.-General Lee wrote to the Secretary of War, on January 22d, that his army was not fed well enough to fit them for the exertions of tter was referred to the Commissary-General, who, after the usual delay, returned it with a long argument to show that General Lee was in error, and that the practice was necessary, etc. To this the Secretary responded by a peremptory order, resarter, else many in this community will famish. About noon to-day, a despatch came from Lieutenant-Colonel Cole, General Lee's principal commissary, at Orange Court House, dated 12th inst., saying the army was out of meat, and had but one day' was $900 a barrel; bacon and lard fell to $8.25 a pound; corn, $12 a bushel; fodder, $12 a cwt. Breakfast, $10. In General Lee's tent meat was eaten twice a week. His bill of fare was a head of cabbage boiled in salt water, sweet potatoes, and