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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 374 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 130 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 113 13 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 74 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 65 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 61 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 7 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 52 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 42 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Richard Taylor or search for Richard Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 6 document sections:

1861-62. They were as follows: Samuel Cooper, to rank May 16, 1861. Albert Sidney Johnston, to rank May 30, 1861. Robert E. Lee, to rank June 14, 1861. J. E. Johnston, to rank July 4, 1861. G. T. Beauregard, to rank July 2r, 1861. Braxton Bragg, to rank April 12, 1862. To explain even more fully the position taken by Mr. Davis in assigning the abovenamed officers to their relative rank, the following extract is taken from Destruction and reconstruction by General Richard Taylor. He writes: Near the close of President Buchanan's administration, in 1860, died General Jessup, Quartermaster-General of the United States Army; and J. E. Johnston, then Lieutenant-Colonel of Cavalry, was appointed to the vacancy. Now the Quartermaster-General had the rank, pay, and emoluments of a Brigadier-General; but the rank was staff, and by law this officer could not exercise command over the troops unless by special assignment. When, in the spring of 1861, the of
n General Lee took command of the Army of Northern Virginia. Before the seven days battles around Richmond, reinforcements to the number of 24, 50 were brought to the army, so that at the beginning of the contest with McClellan, Lee had 80,762 effectives for battle. If we adopt as correct the Confederate loss as given by Swinton, say 19,000, then it would appear that when McClellan reached the James River with 8s,000 to 90,000 men, he was being pursued by Lee with but 62,000. Colonel Taylor: Four Years with Lee, When the news of our great victory over such long odds came to Raleigh, everyone was breathless with excitement. The telegraph office was separated by a narrow alley from my room in the hotel. As I walked my ill baby to and fro by the window, a voice came from the street, Tell us what you know, please. Just then a crowd filled the alley and another voice cried, Boys, I can take it off as it passes. Another one said to me, Do tell us it is a victory ; and as
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 49: Fort Pillow, Ocean Pond, and Meridian. (search)
r's 7,000 troops that had just arrived from Charleston Harbor. This battle expelled the enemy from Florida. On February 3d General Sherman, with 30,000 men, without opposition crossed the State of Mississippi to Meridian. The Federal cavalry started from Corinth and Holly Springs, and laid waste that fertile district on their way to join Sherman. Our great cavalry, leader, General Forrest, with 2,500 cavalry encountered, attacked, and defeated Grierson's and Smith's cavalry forces near West Point, and sent them back to Memphis. By this success General Forrest forced General Sherman to make a hurried retreat through one hundred and fifty miles of country that his soldiers had desolated and plundered. General Banks now attempted to penetrate Central Texas, and destroy the Confederate lines of supplies which Texas still furnished plentifully, the transportation of them being the only difficulty. He was completely routed. General R. Taylor: Destruction and reconstruction.
old Traveller, was finely groomed, and his equipments, bridle-bit, etc., were polished until they shone like silver; he was accompanied by Colonels Marshall and Taylor, of his staff. Colonel Miller Owen; In Camp and Battle. Generals Grant and Lee met at the farmhouse of Mr. McLean, a gentleman, who before and during the b old chieftain, and that we could only grasp the hand of Uncle Robert and pray God help you, General. Colonel William Miller Owen: In Camp and Battle. t Colonel Taylor: Four Years with Lee. There were 7,892 men of the army of Northern Virginia who had arms in their hands at the surrender. The total number, including thoment. It seems to be certain that neither the President, Secretary of War, Quarter-Master-General, nor Commissary-General ever received the requisition. Colonels Taylor and Marshall (of General Lee's staff) both remember that it was well understood that such a requisition had been made, but cannot state with precision either
Chapter 60: Honorable mention. Did my space permit, I would pay special and glad homage to the men who fought and nobly sustained defeat, or now bear their wounds in cheerful poverty, or who fell, examples of all the noble qualities that exalt a nation. But the scope of these memoirs does not permit more than a glimpse of a few of the gallant figures that crowd the memory of every Confederate who looks backward on the field of war. Louisiana gave us Richard Taylor, who fought under the eye of Stonewall Jackson in the Valley, and whose men charged and took Shields's batteries at Port Republic, and who in Louisiana hurled back in disorder the magnificent army of Banks. Bishop General Polk, our saintly gallant veteran, whose death left our country, and especially the Church, mourning; Harry T. Hayes, Yorke, Nicholls, Gibson, Gladden, and Moulton, who charged with his men up the hill at Winchester into the fort deemed impregnable, and put Milroy's army to flight; C. E. Fenn
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 63: the journey to Greensborough.—the surrender of Johnston. (search)
rcy of the conquerors, without making a movement to secure terms that might have — availed to protect the political rights of the people and preserve their property from pillage when it was in his power. Mr. Davis felt that General Johnston's failure to attempt what might have turned out to be his most valuable service to the people of the South, should have tempered the violence of his assaults upon some others who were exerting themselves in behalf of the South. On May 8th, General Richard Taylor agreed with General Canby for the surrender of the land and naval forces in Mississippi and Alabama, on terms similar to those made between Johnston and Sherman. On May 26th, the Chiefs of Staff of Generals Kirby Smith and General Canby arranged similar terms for the surrender of the troops in the trans-Mississippi Department. The total number thus paroled by General Canby in the Department of Alabama and Mississippi was 42,293, to which may be added less than 150 of tlie na