Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Henry Wilson or search for Henry Wilson in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 3 document sections:

Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 47: the Maryland line and the Kilpatrick and Dahlgren raid. (search)
etty he looked in his black velvet suit and Vandyke collar, and I could not reconcile the two Ulrics. The Maryland Line, commanded by Colonel Bradley T. Johnson, rendered noble service in the conduct of his force against the Dahlgren raid. Shortly after this, Colonel Johnson promised me that the Maryland Line should capture a flag for me. In the following fall, September, 1864, there was a sharp cavalry affair between Early's cavalry, under Lomax, and Sheridan's, under Custer and Wilson, at Bunker Hill, in Buckley County, now West Virginia. Charge and counter-charge succeeded each other back and forth the turnpike, and in one of them Captain George M. Emack, commanding Company B, First Maryland regiment, cut down the man carrying the guidon of the opposing regiment, while he wrested from his hand the guidon and brought it off. Emack had the luck that some men have, of being hit almost every time he went under fire. He was the most reckless, daring soldier of that gall
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 43: visit to New Orleans and admission to Fortress Monroe. (search)
d serve me in any way, and Mr. Davis never forgot the courtesy, nor did I. Senator Wilson called with kind words of sympathy also, as did my dear friends, Montgomeryy tribunal would be of little benefit. I consulted with such friends, and Mr. Henry Wilson, Governor John A. Andrew, Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, and Mr. Gerrit Smith. Thes not favorable to Mr. Davis on this matter. At the instance of Mr. Greeley, Mr. Wilson, and, as I was given to understand, of Mr. Stevens, I went to Canada the fir might be tried by the civil authority to answer the indictment for treason. Mr. Wilson, Chairman of the Committee of Military Affairs, offered in the Senate, on Marlution were observed at the time, and necessarily caused people to infer that Mr. Wilson, at least, was not under the delusion that the Government really had a case or of those two special charges against Mr. Davis; and a short time after this Mr. Wilson went to Fortress Monroe to see Mr. Davis. The visit was simply friendly, and
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 80: General Joseph E. Johnston and the Confederate treasure. (search)
A short time before the evacuation of Richmond the bankers of that city placed in Mr. Davis's hands $360,000 in specie for the defence of the city. There was never any service rendered for this money, but when Richmond was evacuated it was transported South with the specie belonging to the Confederacy. A committee of Richmond bankers were sent to receive it. At Washington, Ga., they succeeded in getting between $110,ooo and $120,000, but while transporting it home it was captured by General Wilson's cavalry and turned into the United States Treasury. It is now there in litigation. The Richmond bankers are suing for its recovery, and it has never been decided to whom it belongs. Say $120,000 of it is there and $39,000 in the military chest left at Greensborough for the army, and $20,000 accounted for by Major Moses. This would make $179,000 out of the $2,500,000 which General Beauregard and other good authority estimate was on hand. This charge of General Johnston against t