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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
lad to purchase these books if their attention were called to them. Contributions to our Archives are always acceptable, and gratefully received. Since our last acknowledgment we have received the following: From Yates Snowden, Esq., Charleston, S. C.-Address of Hon. Thos. F. Bayard on Decentralization of power. Address before the South Carolina Historical Society, May 19th, 1876, by William J. Rivers, Esq., of Maryland. Map of Fort Moultrie. Copy of The American Eagle, published atear Coffeeville, Mississippi; The Action and Casualties of the Brigade of Col. Simonton at Fort Donelson. Reports of the Attack by the Enemy's Fleet on Fort McAllister, February 1st, 1863; Engagement at Fayette Courthouse, Cotton Hill, Gauley, Charleston, and Pursuit of the Enemy to the Ohio; of the Operations of Brig.-Gen. Rodes' Brigade at Seven Pines; and of the Capture of the Gunboat J. P. Smith in Stono River. Report of Maj.-Gen. Polk of the Battle of 7th November, 1861, near Columbus, Ky
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
y the hardest stone. Let us look at the condition of affairs at the close of May, 1863. The Federal forces held possession of Fortress Monroe, Yorktown and Norfolk in Virginia, with the control, by means of gunboats, of the Chesapeake, York river, and James river up to the mouth of the Appomattox — of the entire coast of North Carolina, except the mouth of Cape Fear river-of Port Royal and Beaufort island on the coast of South Carolina, with Charleston harbor blockaded and the city of Charleston besieged — of Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah river, in Georgia--of the mouth of the St. John's river, Key West and Pensacola, in Florida--of the lower Mississippi, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Memphis, with Vicksburg and Port Hudson besieged, the fall of which latter towns was all that was necessary to give complete possession of the Mississippi river--of West Tennessee, the northern portion of Middle Tennessee, all of Kentucky, northwestern Virginia, including the Valley of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
arris, giving his plans, resources, and general views of the approaching campaign. From Rev. P. B. Price, of Virginia-Memoir of Capt. Thos. E. King, by Rev. Dr. Jos. C. Stiles. [We are anxious to secure all similar publications made during the war.] From A. Barron Holmes, Charleston--South Carolina in the revolution. A Memorial of the Special Services held May, 1875, at St. Philip's Church, Charleston, in commemoration of the planting of the Church of England in the Province of S. C. arris, giving his plans, resources, and general views of the approaching campaign. From Rev. P. B. Price, of Virginia-Memoir of Capt. Thos. E. King, by Rev. Dr. Jos. C. Stiles. [We are anxious to secure all similar publications made during the war.] From A. Barron Holmes, Charleston--South Carolina in the revolution. A Memorial of the Special Services held May, 1875, at St. Philip's Church, Charleston, in commemoration of the planting of the Church of England in the Province of S. C.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of torpedo service in Charleston Harbor by W. T. Glassel, Commander Confederate States Navy. (search)
been ordered to command the naval forces at Charleston, torpedoes were fitted to the bows of ironcl My esteemed friend, Mr. Theodore Stoney, of Charleston, took measures for the construction of the l, monitors and ironsides, crossed the bar at Charleston and took their comfortable positions protectMorris' Island, and occasionally bombarding Fort Sumter. The North Carolina being finished, wase men from the North Carolina by railroad to Charleston immediately. An attack on that city was expe it run out a little longer. We passed Fort Sumter and beyond the line of picket-boats withoutnce of flood-tide, I might be able to reach Fort Sumter, but a north wind was against me, and afterwned, until I heard of their safe arrival in Charleston. I was retained as a prisoner in Fort Lad him of the glory of laying low the city of Charleston. It was said by officers of the navy that t late. I made efforts to do what I could at Charleston, till it became necessary to abandon that ci[2 more...]