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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,756 1,640 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 979 67 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 963 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 742 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 694 24 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 457 395 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 449 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 427 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 420 416 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 410 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Washington (United States) or search for Washington (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 46 results in 11 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The exchange question-another letter from Judge Ould. (search)
The exchange question-another letter from Judge Ould. [ We propose to continue, from time to time, to ventilate this question, and to pile up the evidence which acquits the Confederacy of all blame and convicts the authorities at Washington of the entire responsibility in this matter. The following letter of our Agent of Exchange is worth preserving:] Richmond, July 18, 1867. my dear Sir: I have read the remarkable discussion in the House. Mr. Eldridge is substantially right in what he said. I offered early in August to deliver all the sick and wounded prisoners we had without requiring equivalents for them. I would have made the offer earlier but for the fact that some considerable time before I had made an offer of exchange, man for man, to which I could get no response. I waited for a response until early in August, and failing to receive one, I then made the offer above named, at the same time urging haste on the part of the United States government, as the mortal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg. (search)
covering Fairfield would have given him the Valley to support himself himself on, and would have been so threatening to Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia and Harrisburg that public clamor would have forced Meade to try and dislodge him. We had ammuequent events. The fruit of the first battle of Manassas was lost partly on account of the opinion that the capture of Washington and the invasion of Maryland would unite the political parties of the North and obliterate the hope of a speedy terminaonsideration: Should we defeat General Hooker in a general engagement south of the Potomac any where in the vicinity of Washington, his shattered army would find refuge within the defences of that city, as two Federal armies have previously done, andto turn it by the south, which was its weak place, by extending his right so as to endanger Meade's communications with Washington. 5th. The heroic but foolish attack of Pickett on the third should never have been attempted. Longstreet seems to t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Second paper by Colonel Walter H. Taylor, of General Lee's staff. (search)
ced into Pennsylvania. General A. P. Hill, whose corps was the last to leave the line of the Rappahannock, followed with his three divisions in Ewell's rear. General Longstreet covered these movements with his corps; then moved by Ashby's and Snicker's Gaps into the Valley and likewise crossed the Potomac river, leaving to General Stuart the task of holding the gaps of the Blue Ridge mountains with his corps of cavalry. The Federal commander had meanwhile moved his army so as to cover Washington city; and, as soon as he was thoroughly informed, by Ewell's rapid advance, of the real intention of his adversary, he too crossed into Maryland. On the 27th of June General Lee was near Chambersburg with the First and Third corps, the Second being still in advance, but within supporting distance. With the exception of the cavalry, the army was well in hand. The absence of that indispensable arm of the service was most seriously felt by General Lee. He had directed General Stuart to use
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
e, he is wrong, as the subjoined statement of the strength of that army, taken from the official returns now on file in Washington, will show: Confederate.Federal. Seven days fight, 186280,000115,000 Fredericksburg, 186278,000110,000 Chancellorbly thinking he could carry out General Lee's orders, and at the same time make a brilliant dash toward and threatening Washington, worked by his right flank, separating himself from Longstreet, crossing the Potomac between the enemy and Washington cWashington city-making a swoop toward Washington, then turning west to join the Army of Northern Virginia, when he found the enemy had crossed the Potomac and were between him and that army. This necessitated his riding entirely around the Federal army, and brWashington, then turning west to join the Army of Northern Virginia, when he found the enemy had crossed the Potomac and were between him and that army. This necessitated his riding entirely around the Federal army, and brought him, whether from necessity or not, I cannot say, to Carlisle, Pa. From this point he struck south and joined the Army of Northern Virginia, being late in the evening of July second. It is thus evident that so far as deriving any assistance fro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
e held in the Hall of the House of Delegates, in this city, on Wednesday evening, October the 31st. General John T. Morgan, of Selma, U. S. Senator from Alabama, will deliver the annual address, and a pleasant occasion is anticipated. Members of the Society and all others interested in our work are cordially invited to attend. The reunion of the Virginia division of the A. N. V. Association takes place in Richmond on Thursday night, November 1st. Leigh Robinson, Esq., of Washington, a gallant high private in the old Richmond Howitzers, is the orator of the occasion, and has chosen as his theme, The Battle of the Wilderness. The banquet which is to follow the public address will be an occasion of rare enjoyment, when old comrades will share their rations with each other and fight their battles o'er again. The financial statement in our last issue was by no means intended to convey the idea that there is any purpose to suspend our publications. We only desired
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The peace Commission.-letter from Ex-President Davis. (search)
e; that a few days after his inauguration he appointed commissioners to go to Washington with full authority to negotiate for a peaceful and equitable settlement betw It was expected that they would be passed through the lines and received in Washington. Mr. Hunter's instructions requested him, totidem verbis--To proceed to WWashington city for informal conference with Mr. Lincoln. A true-hearted Confederate, it might have been thought reasonably, instead of seeking to put his Presidehe Secretary of State for Messrs. Stevens, Hunter and Campbell. [Copy.]Washington, January 13, 1865. F. P. Blair; Esq.: Sir: You having shown me Mr. Davis', of which the foregoing is a copy, you are hereby requested to proceed to Washington city for conference with him upon the subject to which it relates. With greLincoln, of which the foregoing is a copy, you are requested to proceed to Washington city for informal conference with him upon the issues involved in the existing
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
circle, he moved on the cord of it; and that, therefore, our movements had to be rapid while his were slow. When our army had crossed the Potomac he was enabled to recruit his strength, not only from the convalescents from the hospitals at Washington, Baltimore, and further North, time enough having elapsed to enable the wounded from the fields of Chancellorsville and Fredericksburg to begin to return to duty, but also from the troops in the defences of Washington south of the Potomac, now Washington south of the Potomac, now rendered useless there, as well as from new recruits answering to the many earnest appeals to the loyal North to rally to the Standard of the Union and the defence of the invaded loyal State, as well as of the National Capital. It was not probable, therefore, that his army should decrease from causes similar to those that were diminishing ours. His chief of staff, who subsequently occupied the same relation to Meade, in his testimony (Con. Rep., 428), says that on the 10th of June, when Hooke
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Supplement to General Early's Review.-reply to General Longstreet. (search)
te to this statement as follows: This and subsequent revelations of the purposes and sentiments of Lee I derive from General Longstreet, who, in a full and free conversation with the writer after the close of the war, threw much light on the motives and conduct of Lee during this campaign. On pages 340-1, he says: Longstreet, holding the right of the Confederate line, had one flank securely posted on the Emmetsburg road, so that he was really between the Army of the Potomac and Washington, and by marching towards Frederick could undoubtedly have manceuvered Meade out of the Gettysburg position. This operation Gen. Longstreet, who foreboded the worst from an attack on the army in position, and was anxious to hold General Lee to his promise, begged in vain to be allowed to execute. To this there is a foot note as follows: The officer named is my authority for this statement. On page 358 there is this foot note: The absence of Pickett's division on the day be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The peace Commission-Hon. R. M. T. Hunter's reply to President Davis' letter. (search)
e; that a few days after his inauguration he appointed commissioners to go to Washington with full authority to negotiate for a peaceful and equitable settlement betwirm my statements. Mr. Davis asserts that we were instructed to confer at Washington. Whether he means that we had no right to confer anywhere else I know not. Ich help his character for historical accuracy. House of Representatives, Washington, D. C., 3d November, 1877. Hon. Robert M. T. Hunter, Richmond, Va.: my dear She lines of the Federal armies and told it would serve us as a passport to Washington City. The letters of appointment for the Commissioners, and I believe the t did not understand our passport, if I may so call it, and had to apply to Washington City. While awaiting instructions, and within two or three days after our depaolonel Eckert, an officer of the United States, arrived at City Point from Washington City. He had a copy of the letter from President Lincoln to Mr. Blair. With G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A slander Refuted. (search)
Also, all Confederate officers and men who have been delivered at City Point at any time previous to July 25th, 1863, have been duly exchanged, and are hereby so declared. Ro. Ould, Aqent of Exchangce. Richmond, September 12, 1863. By order: S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General. And if Mr. Blaine will not receive rebel authority, then the following is submitted: On page 74 of General Boynton's book (Sherman's Historical raid) the following telegram from Gen. Halleck, at Washington, to Burnside, in East Tennessee, is given: September 18,--. A part at least of Longstreet's corps is going to Atlanta. It is believed that Bragg, Johnston, and Hardee, with the exchanged prisoners from Vicksburg and Port Hudson, are concentrating against Rosecrans. You must give him all the aid you can. [Italics ours.] Either Mr. Blaine is mistaken, therefore, in giving General Grant as his authority for saying that these high-toned gentlemen and gallant soldiers violated their parol
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