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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 45 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Torpedo service in the Harbor and water defences of Charleston. (search)
ished soldier who made the heroic defence of Charleston, has been delayed much longer than we had inf the use of those engines of destruction at Charleston during our late civil war. To give a correctve by General Beauregard. On my return to Charleston in September, 1862, to assume command of thew 8-inch columbiads, which had been left in Forts Sumter and Moultrie by Major Anderson, and about ars (which form the peninsula of the city of Charleston), the steamer engaged in that duty being swug his floating battery, Mr. C. H. Steven, of Charleston, (who afterward died a brigadier-general at ce of about thirty-five degrees to the fire of Sumter; the surface was to be well greased and the guy, to demand the evacuation or surrender of Fort Sumter, a vessel from England arriving in the oute863, when Admiral Dupont made his attack on Fort Sumter with seven monitors, the New Ironsides, sev and Sullivan's Islands, and, soon after, of Charleston itself, for I had not yet had time to comple[31 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
neral agent in the West, General George D. Johnston, continues to be most successful in his canvass, and to meet a cordial reception wherever he goes in Tennessee. In Nashville, Clarksville, and Jackson he has secured more than 350 subscribers. He is just beginning the canvass of Memphis. We again commend him as a gallant soldier and an accomplished gentleman every way worthy of confidence and esteem, but he needs no introduction to his comrades of the Western army. Our Trip to Charleston, S. C., and participation in the 22d of February celebration, was a most delightful one, and we made notes of some matters of special historic interest, but want of space compels us to postpone them. We were also fortunate in securing as our agent for South Carolina Colonel Zimmerman Davis, a gallant soldier and excellent gentleman, who is making a most successful canvass for the Society. Our financial prospects, (our friends will be glad to learn) continue to grow brighter, and if our
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
Editorial paragraphs. the Confederate home at Charleston, S. C., is an institution which we have had opportunity of visiting several times recently, and which should command the warm sympathies, fervent prayers, and liberal contributions of philanthropists everywhere. Not long after the close of the war an energetic, devoted South Carolina woman determined to establish a home for the widows and daughters of Confederate soldiers, who gave their lives or were disabled in the cause of S Independence. A contribution of $1, made by a poor widow, an inmate of a Home in Baltimore, was the small beginning of this noble charity; benevolent gentlemen and noble women took hold of the enterprise; a building, once the leading hotel of Charleston, and every way suitable for the purpose, was rented (the projector of the scheme mortgaging her private property as pledge for payment of the rent), and has since been purchased; and the enterprise has succeeded beyond the most sanguine expecta
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notice. (search)
Book notice. Fitzhugh St. Clair, the S. C. Rebel boy, by Mrs. Sallie F. Chapin, of Charleston. Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Hafflefinger. We are indebted to the accomplished authoress for a copy of this book, which we have read with deep interest. It is a well-laid plot and an admirably-told story of a noble South Carolina family whose head was killed in battle, and whose members had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of South Carolina were plunged by the pack of thieves who plundered the State at the close of the war. It shows how high character and Christian principle can resist temptation and win at last the reward of virtue, and holds up a model for the young men of the South which we could wish them all to read and imitate.