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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 298 44 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 252 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 126 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 90 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 69 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Warren or search for Warren in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
timore turnpike, but it was easily checked by the fire of our artillery. In forming the line I received material assistance from Major-General Howard, Brigadier-General Warren, Brigadier-General Buford, and officers of General Howard's command. As soon as the line of battle mentioned above was shown by the enemy, Wadsworth's crops, not getting up, until then. General Longstreet, by an early attack, would have undoubtedly seized Round Top, for even as late as the attack was made, General Warren, Meade's chief of artillery (Warren's testimony before the Committee on the Conduct of the War, page 377),. says he went by General Meade's directions to RounWarren's testimony before the Committee on the Conduct of the War, page 377),. says he went by General Meade's directions to Round Top, and from that point I could see the enemy's line of battle. I sent word to General Meade that he would at once have to occupy that place very strongly. He sent as quickly as possible a division of General Sykes' corps, (Fifth,) but before they arrived the enemy's line of battle, I should think a mile and a half long, bega
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
son of the South who is not willing to repudiate the most sacred obligations. Mrs. M. A. Snowden, President, or Miss J. A. Adger, Corresponding Secretary, would take pleasure in communicating with any one desiring further information concerning the Home. 255 Errata are troublesome, but some errors crept into our last issue which must be corrected. In General Fitz. Lee's article, page 185, (twelve lines from the bottom), occupied should read unoccupied. On page 188, instead of General Warren, Meade's Chief of artillery; it should read Chief of Engineers. Page 192, concluded should read couched; and on same page, instead of attacked Meade's key-point, it should be unlocked. the Archive Bureau at Washington has excited, from time to time, considerable interest. For years closely guarded from all save a favored few, its occasional outgivings have only served to sharpen the appetite of those interested in such matters, and to make them all the more anxious to have access
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reply to General Longstreet's Second paper. (search)
ut which I was in doubt. When I arrived on the ground, which I did a few minutes before four o'clock in the afternoon, I found General Sickles had taken a position very much in advance of what it had been my intention that he should take. General Warren, after saying he had reconnoitred in front of their right and advised against an attack there, adds: Soon afterwards I rode out with General Meade to examine the left of our line, where General Sickles was. His troops could hardly be s He then says that he went to Round Top, by Meade's direction, and from there sent word to Meade that that point would have to be occupied very strongly. Meade then ordered a division of Sykes' corps, which was coming up, to the position, and Warren says: The troops under General Sykes arrived barely in time to save Round Top hill, and they had a very desperate fight to hold it. The assumption, under these circumstances, that, had the attack been made earlier or later, we should ha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Decision of the Supreme Court of Tennessee that the Confederacy was de jure as well as de facto-opinion of Judge Turney. (search)
h it the right to purchase or manufacture, and in the manufacture the right to the means requisite for its achievement. Case cited: Smith v. Brazleton, 1 Heis., 46. 4. State.-Right.-A State having a right may employ the means necessary for its perfection and enjoyment, and to this end may engage its citizens, or they may voluntarily contribute to it. 5. Case at Bar.-In the present case the contract was freely and voluntarily entered into, and was, therefore, legal and binding. From Warren. Appeal in error from the judgment of the Circuit Court, October term, 1869. William P. Hickerson, J. W. E. B. Jones, Rowan & Wommack, for appellant; John H. Savage, for appellee. Turney, J., delivered the opinion of the Court. The circuit judge charged the jury: If the officers of the Bank had notice that the money was to be used by the defendant's intestate in. aid of the Southern Confederacy, as for the manufacture of one of the ingredients of gunpowder, and with a view and for