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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 5 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 3 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Harding or search for Harding in all documents.

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itered the country within a mile and a half of the enemy's entrenchments at Columbus, by which fears of an attack were excited in the rebel camps. Several mounted rebel pickets were taken prisoners during various reconnoissances on the way; rebel couriers from Columbus were captured, and a number of roads, not mentioned on the maps, were discovered. The enemy's position at Columbus was fully ascertained, and the existence of many loyal citizens proved.--(Doc. 17.) A Report by Adjutant-General Harding to Governor Gamble, shows that thirty-three thousand eight hundred and eighty-two Missouri troops have entered the Federal service for three years, or during the war; of which twenty-five thousand are infantry, three thousand artillery, and six thousand cavalry. The number of militia organized under the Governor's call for six months men is upward of six thousand. Lieutenant Ammen, commanding United States gunboat Seneca, reported to Commodore Dupont that the negroes in the ne
h he said, that, after the most strenuous exertions on the part of its officers, the State finds it impossible to clothe and shoe our soldiers without again appealing to that overflowing fountain of generosity — the private contributions of our people, and asking that all possible contributions be made. A great lot of blankets, also, might yet be spared from private use, and thousands could be made from the carpets on our parlor floors. --(Doc. 8.) The bark Lamplighter, of Boston, Captain Harding, from New York to Gibraltar, was this day captured in latitude 41° 30′, longitude 59° 17, by the rebel privateer Alabama, and burned. The Right Reverend John H. Hopkins, Episcopal Bishop of Vermont, addressed a letter to the House of Bishops, assembled in General Convention at New York, protesting against the political aspect of the Pastoral Letter adopted by that body.--See Supplement. The Bridgeport (Second Connecticut) battery, one hundred and sixty-five men, under the comm<
killed, and twenty wounded.--(Doc. 117.) A successful reconnoissance was this day made to Liberty, Auburn, and Lebanon. Tenn., by a body of National troops under the command of General J. J. Reynolds. They obtained important information concerning the position and operations of the rebel forces; ascertained that the inhabitants of many portions of Tennessee hitherto unvisited by National troops, were loyal to the Union ; obtained large material results in the capture of supplies, and in destroying rebel means of support; broke up a rebel camp, dispersing the rebels in all directions; had several skirmishes with guerrillas, routing them on each occasion with great slaughter. Fort Donelson, Tennessee, garrisoned by only six hundred of the Eighty-third Illinois, under the command of Colonel Harding, was attacked by a large rebel force under Generals Wheeler and Forrest, and after a desperate contest of five hours duration, the rebels were repulsed and retreated.--(Doc. 118.)