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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 100 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 90 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 86 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 80 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 44 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 32 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Grand Gulf (Mississippi, United States) or search for Grand Gulf (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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eld thirty-eight dead, including several officers, and sixty-six wounded. A hundred prisoners were captured, among them Lieutenant-Colonel Finney, Major Edgar, and others. Three hundred stand of arms were taken. In the evening, to secure their retreat, they burned Greenbrier bridge, beyond which they could not be pursued. Crook's victory was won only by hard fighting against greatly superior forces. The Nationals lost fourteen killed, sixty wounded, and five pickets captured. Some of the wounded were shot in the streets of Lewisburgh, as they were returning to the hospital, by the citizens of the town.--(Doc. 44.) The town of Grand Gulf, Miss., was shelled by the Union gunboats Richmond and Hartford. Considerable damage was done to the town, but no person was injured. The reason assigned for the shelling was, that two United States transports loaded with soldiers were fired into by a masked battery of four guns in the vicinity of the town.--Jackson Mississippian, June 4.
mmand of the Excelsior brigade, N. Y. S. volunteers.--The Confiscation Bill passed the United States House of Representatives. The British steamer Patras was captured, twenty-two miles off Charleston bar, by the United States gunboat Bienville, Commander Mullaney, while attempting to run the blockade. Her cargo consisted of gunpowder, rifles, coffee, and a large quantity of quinine. She had no papers showing her nationality or port of destination. A skirmish took place near Grand Gulf, Miss., between a small party of Union troops, commanded by Lieut. De Kay, which landed from the gunboat Kennebec and a body of rebel cavalry, resulting in the retreat of the Unionists, and the loss of their leader, Lieut. De Kay, who was killed at the first fire. Lieutenant Frank C. Davis, of the Third Pennsylvania cavalry, returned to Fair Oak Station, after successfully delivering a message from Gen. McClellan to Captain Rodgers, in command of the Union gunboats on the James River.--(
February 24. The United States steamer Indianola, under the command of Lieutenant George Brown, was this day captured in the Mississippi River, near Grand Gulf, after an engagement lasting one hour and a half, by the rebel iron-clad steamers Queen of the West and William H. Webb, and the armed steamers Doctor Batey and Grand Duke.--(Doc. 124.) The steamer Hetty Gilmore, was captured and destroyed by the rebels under the command of W. C. P. Breckenridge, at Woodbury, Tenn.--The Savannah News of this date said: There seems to be now a great rage for investing in confederate bonds. Every body is buying bonds — that is, every body who has treasury notes wherewith to buy. How great the contrast! Here our people are seeking confederate government paper. In Lincolndom every body is avoiding government paper, and paying enormous prices for every article which will enable them to get rid of Yankee promises to pay! This is one of the best signs of the times. At Richmond, Va.
April 1. Admiral Farragut with the National gunboats Hartford, Switzerland, and Albatross, engaged the rebel batteries at Grand Gulf. Miss., and succeeded in passing below them without material damage.--Secretary Gabandau's Report. The National Bank of Erie, Pa., was organized by M. Sanford and associates, to commence business on the first of May.--Captain Mosby, of the rebel cavalry, made a raid near Broad Run, Va. His force was encountered by a portion of the First Vermont cavalry, when a sharp fight ensued. The rebels took up a position behind a fence which the Union cavalry could not get over, and from which they were unable to dislodge the rebels. During the fight Captain Flint, of the First Vermont cavalry, and a lieutenant of the same regiment, were severely wounded.
e rebels escaped, the National cavalry keeping up a running fight for three miles, and capturing thirty of the rebels, besides killing and wounding twelve of their number. Corporal Jacob R. Shaveles, of company E, Third Ohio, was the only one wounded on the National side. He acted very gallantly, charging a squad of rebels single-handed, and sabreing half a dozen before being shot. --Cincinnati Gazette. At daylight this morning, Admiral Farragut, with the National squadron, left Grand Gulf, Miss., and proceeded to the mouth of Red River, destroying on the way a large number of rebel skiffs and flatboats. He arrived at the Red River at sundown.--Secretary Gabandau's Report. Major W. C. Ransom, of the Sixth Kansas cavalry, destroyed the band of rebel guerrillas under Colonel Hicks, in Jackson County, Mo., killing seventeen and hanging two who were engaged in the robbery of the steamer Sam Gaty. He also recovered a portion of the contrabands captured from that steamer, besi
Salem, Mosby, with one hundred and fifty men, was driven from the place. From Salem the column moved on to White Plains, which place was reached about dark. Here a rebel lieutenant in Stuart's command was round, who was wounded. From White Plains the force made a night-march back to Middleburgh. Halting a few hours, they moved on to Aldie, which place they reached about four o'clock. After resting a few hours at Aldie, the line of march was taken, and the troops reached camp about five o'clock this morning. This reconnoissance demonstrated that there was no regular force of the rebels in the valley between the Bull Run mountains and the Blue Ridge. Grand Gulf, Miss., was this day attacked by a fleet of seven U. S. gunboats under the command of Admiral Porter. After a bombardment of five hours duration, the rebel batteries were silenced, but not without considerably damaging the hulls of the fleet, and killing twenty and wounding a large number of their crews.--(Doc. 179.)
tion, when hostilities, in a great measure, ceased for the day.--(Doc. 183.) The Catholic Bishop of Iowa, in a sermon at Dubuque, pointedly denounced the Knights of the Golden Circle, stating that he would give the members of the church who had joined the organization, two weeks to leave it, and then, if they still continued in it, they might consider themselves excommunicated.--The British schooner Emma Amelia was captured at St. Andrew's Bay, Fla., by the National bark Roebuck.--Grand Gulf, Miss., was abandoned at daylight this morning, the rebels blowing up the magazines and spiking their guns. Soon after the evacuation the place was entered by the National forces, under Admiral D. D. Porter.--(Doc. 184.) A short fight occurred near Warrenton Junction, Va., between a party of General Stahel's cavalry, under Colonel De Forest, and Mosby's rebel guerrillas, resulting in the rout of the latter with great loss.--(Doc. 185.) The ship Sea Lark, in latitude 24° south, long
w as a grateful acknowledgment for the almost inestimable service you have done the country. I wish to say a word further. When you first reached the vicinity of Vicksburgh, I thought you should do what you finally did, march the troops across the neck, run the batteries with the transports, and thus go below; and I never had any faith, except a general hope that you knew better than I, that the Yazoo Pass expedition, and the like, could succeed. When you got below and took Port Gibson, Grand Gulf, and vicinity, I thought you should go down the river and join General Banks; and when you turned northward, east of the Big Black, I thought it was a mistake. I now wish to make the personal acknowledgment that you was right and I was wrong. The funeral of Brigadier-General Samuel K. Zook, who was killed at the battle of Gettysburgh, took place at New York City.--General George G. Meade issued a proclamation in reference to depredations committed by citizens, or rebel soldiers in di