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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 67 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 18 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 10 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Paraje (New Mexico, United States) or search for Paraje (New Mexico, United States) in all documents.

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to five thousand stand of arms.--(Doc. 68.) A party of New Mexican Union volunteers, under Captain Mink, was surprised at Alimosa, thirty-five miles below Fort Craig, by one hundred and ten Texan rebels, and their horses stampeded. Captain Mink proposed to surrender his company; but his men dissented, secured their horses, surrender his company; but his men dissented, secured their horses, and retreated to Fort Craig. Subsequently about one hundred United States troops, from Fort Craig, pursued the rebels, overtook them, killed their captain and ten men, wounded about thirty, and killed thirty horses. The balance of the Texans escaped to Mesilla. surrender his company; but his men dissented, secured their horses, and retreated to Fort Craig. Subsequently about one hundred United States troops, from Fort Craig, pursued the rebels, overtook them, killed their captain and ten men, wounded about thirty, and killed thirty horses. The balance of the Texans escaped to Mesilla.
December 27. Intelligence was received at Washington that Col. Canby, in command of the military department of New Mexico, had retaken Forts Craig and Stanton, on the Masilla border, driving the Texans away, and was on the way to Fort Fillmore to dispossess the rebels at that post, which was traitorously surrendered by Colonel Lynde to an inferior force of Texans. Thence he intended marching into Arizona to drive off the rebels.--The Legislature of New Mexico met on the 2d of December. Governor Connelly, in his message, recommended active measures with reference to the Indians who had been tampered with by Albert Pike, suggesting that they be located on the reservations, and encouraged in agricultural pursuits. The Indians, for the greater part, were peaceable and friendly to the United States Government.--Philadelphia Press, Dec. 28. The burning of buildings near New Market Bridge, Va., by order of Brigadier-General Mansfield, called forth the following order from Gener
nd the old men from their useful labors. Rumors of the partial evacuation of Manassas, Va., by the rebels, were prevalent in Washington to-day, but they were not generally credited. A battle took place, to-day, about seven miles from Fort Craig, near Valverde, Valverde is a small village, situated on the left bank of the Rio del Norte, or Rio Grande, near the border of New Mexico and Arizona. Fort Craig is ten miles north of this point, on the same river. Col. Kit Carson, who is sFort Craig is ten miles north of this point, on the same river. Col. Kit Carson, who is said to have done good service with his regiment, deployed as skirmishers, has had his headquarters at Albuquerque for some time, and appears to have arrived at the scene of conflict at a mast opportune time. on the Rio Grande, New Mexico, between the rebel forces under Col. Steele, and the National forces commanded by Col. Canby. The battle lasted from nine o'clock in the morning till sundown, and resulted in the defeat of the National troops, who were obliged to retreat to the Fort. McRae's b
or Donaldson, Chief of the Quarter-master's Department, in New Mexico, arrived at Washington to-day. He brings much important information in regard to the rebel raid into that territory. He says the rebels hold every position of value, except Fort Craig and Fort Union. The latter, which is the most important Fort in the far West, containing millions of dollars' worth of government stores, is now safe beyond peradventure. It is garrisoned by one thousand five hundred soldiers, has water withids anything on record. They traversed forty miles a day during the last four days, when they heard the Fort was in danger of falling. Their timely arrival secured its absolute safety. Major Donaldson relates many incidents of the battle near Fort Craig, and says that Major Lockridge, of Nicaragua fillibuster fame, fell dead at the head. of the Texas rangers in their last charge upon Captain McRea's battery.--N. Y. Commercial, April 3. Early yesterday morning, a regiment of picked men, b
re greatly demoralized, broken up in bands, and devastating the country, and threatening to kill their General, Sibley, who, they say, deceived them by informing them that it was only necessary to march into the country, which was anxious to receive them, and all they had to do was to drive out the Federal officers, and that they would live and possess the country in ease and luxury. The Colorado volunteers, (Pike's Peakers,) and some one thousand regulars, are at and in the vicinity of Fort Craig, under command of Col. Paul. Gen. Canby has reestablished his headquarters at Santa Fe, where he and the staff are at present.--Missouri Democrat. An expedition consisting of six squadrons of the First Wisconsin cavalry, from Cape Girardeau, Mo., went to Bloomfield yesterday, and early this morning fell upon the rebel Col. Phelan's camp, scattering them in every direction, with one killed and eleven captured. A large number of horses and a quantity of camp equipage were also taken. A
try and cavalry, in General Banks's department, was driven from Front Royal, with considerable loss, by a large body of rebels.--(Doc. 43.) Captain Tilford, stationed with forty men on the east side of the Rio Grande, seven miles below Fort Craig, N. M., received a summons to surrender from a band of two hundred Texans. He refused; but after fighting for three hours, was obliged to retreat to Fort Craig with the loss of three wounded.--Denver Herald. Portions of the army of the PotomFort Craig with the loss of three wounded.--Denver Herald. Portions of the army of the Potomac crossed the Chickahominy River in two places, at the Railroad Bridge and at Bottom's Bridge. The battle of Lewisburgh, Va., was fought this day. The rebel Colonel Heath attacked Col. Crook with three thousand infantry and cavalry, and six cannon. After a spirited fight of an hour, the rebels were put to flight in utter confusion, and their flight soon became a rout. Col. Crook captured four rifled cannon--one so near his position that it was loaded with canister — and caissons, and eig