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Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 13, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 13, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Upton's Hill (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Upton's Hill (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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the ferry at Georgetown with his Staff, and rode to Bailey's Cross Roads. They then followed the course of the railroad to Upton House and Hill. They saw only half a dozen horsemen on Munson's Hill. General Wadsworth moved to the right and front with a body of skirmishers, and Captain Colburn, of General McClellan's Staff, skirmished to the left, without encountering any of the enemy. General Richardson then moved forward with a body of troops toward the hill, the rebel horsemen retiring as they approached. They entered the work without difficulty, and found that the rebels had taken every thing of value with them. Eight regiments were moved forward to the outposts. A portion of Richardson's Brigade and a portion of McDowell's Division occupy Munson's Hill. The fort on Munson's Hill is a closed work, and a great deal of labor has been expended upon it. The site was not well selected, as it is fully commanded by Upton's Hill, which is now held by the national forces.--(Doc. 61.)
urg Sun hopes it will be taken, its owners paid a fair market valuation for it, and receive a strong hint to leave the country. --(Doc. 167.) Salutes were fired at various places in the loyal States, in commemoration of the victory at Port Royal, South Carolina. This morning a foraging party, consisting of fifty-seven of the Thirtieth N. V. Volunteers, attached to Gen. Keyes' Brigade in the army of the Potomac, went out to Doolin and Brush's Farm, three miles and a half west of Upton's Hill, Va., to draw away the forage which they had collected and left a day or two before. They took with them five four-horse wagons, and after loading up, Doolin, one of the owners of the farm, invited the men in to dinner. The soldiers foolishly accepted, and more foolishly stacked their arms outside the house, and went in, leaving eight men acting as pickets in the neighborhood. The moment the men sat down to dinner Doolin despatched a servant to the house of Brush, a mile distant, with
ried to the rebel camp.--Wheeling Intelligencer. The Union gunboat Darlington, which left Jacksonville, Fla., on the sixth, on an expedition up St. John's River, returned this day, bringing the rebel steamer Governor Milton, which it had captured two hundred miles up the river. A slight skirmish took place near Aldie, Va., between a small party of Union troops and a numerically superior force of rebels, resulting in the retreat of the Nationals without loss. The rebels had one man killed, Leiut. Mars.--An expedition consisting of about one thousand five hundred cavalry, supported by a battery of artillery, under the command of Colonel Davies, left camp at Upton's Hill, Va., on the sixth instant, for the purpose of capturing or destroying five or six locomotives on the Orange and Alexandria Railway at Rappahannock Station. It was discovered that the locomotives had been removed to the other side of the Rappahannock River, and the expedition returned to-day to Centreville.