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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 346 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 72 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 60 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 56 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 46 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 46 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Oregon (Oregon, United States) or search for Oregon (Oregon, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 8 document sections:

March 4. Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated at Washington, sixteenth President of the United States. He kissed the thirty-four States of the Union as represented by thirty-four young ladies. The inauguration procession proceeded to the east portico of the capitol, in front of which a platform had been erected. Every available space in the vicinity was packed with a curious crowd of spectators. Every thing being in readiness, Senator Baker, of Oregon, came forward and introduced Mr. Lincoln in these simple words: Fellow-citizens: I introduce to you Abraham Lincoln, the President-elect of the United States of America. Mr. Lincoln then advanced to a small table, which had been placed for his accommodation, and proceeded to deliver his inaugural address, every word of which was distinctly heard on the outskirts of the swaying crowd. The oath of office was then administered to Mr. Lincoln by Chief Justice Taney; the procession was again formed, Mr. Lincoln was escorted to the Wh
ng from the anarchy with which that State has lately been threatened, assuring them that it will be his sole aim that the people of Missouri can worship God together, each feeling that his fellow-worship. per is not an enemy; that each can meet his neighbor without any conversations on blood and slaughter. The inaugural closes with a strong appeal for the cultivation of confidence and good feeling.--(Doc. 151.) The steamer B. P. Cheney was seized by the rebels at Columbus, Kentucky, and carried to the Headquarters of Gen. Pillow.--Louisville Courier, August 10. In the Senate of the United States, the bill to suppress insurrection and sedition was taken up, and an exciting debate occurred, in which Mr. Breckinridge and Mr. Baker, of Oregon, took part.--(Doc. 152.) the St. Louis Democrat of this day gives an account of the preparation and departure of Gen. Fremont's expedition from St. Louis to Bird's Point, Cairo, and other positions on the Mississippi River.--(Doc. 153.)
September 16. An expedition from Hatteras Inlet, under the command of Lieutenants Maxwell and Eastman, of the steamer Pawnee, visited Ocracoke Inlet and destroyed Fort Oregon, a fine fortification at that place. The expedition was entirely successful.--(Doc. 51.) The gunboat Conestoga captured the steamers V. R. Stephenson and Gazelle, on the Cumberland River, Ky. The Stephenson had fifty tons of iron aboard. The Gazelle was without a cargo.--Louisville Journal, September 19. Ship Island, near the mouth of the Mississippi River, was evacuated by the rebels and immediately taken possession of by the National forces.--(Doc. 52.) Major French, the commanding officer at Key West, published the following important order; its promulgation caused a vast amount of commotion among the secessionists: Headquarters U. S. Troops, Key West, Florida, September 16, 1861. I. Within ten days from this late all male citizens of the Island of Key West who have taken the oa
avor of maintaining the integrity of the Union, was held at Lake Mohican. The Hon. John B. Haskin made a most eloquent and stirring speech to the assemblage, and declared his determination to sink all party differences and to support the Government in all honorable acts for a vigorous prosecution of the war and the preservation of the best Government ever vouchsafed to man. Eloquent speeches were also made by Messrs. Depew, Bailey, and Ferris. Edward D. Baker, United States Senator from Oregon, was appointed a Major-General of Volunteers in the National army. This morning John Bateman, a citizen of Portland, Maine, arrived at New York in custody of the deputy marshal. The prisoner stands charged with high treason, with using Mathias, seditious language against the United States of America and the President thereof, treasonable complicity with Southern rebels and their agents in Liverpool and other parts of Europe. It is stated that letters and papers were found in the bagga
e to St. Louis Bay. It is situated one hundred and sixty-five miles to the south-southeast of Jackson. It is fifty miles from New Orleans, thirteen miles from Mississippi City, and twenty-five military miles from Biloxi. It is thirty miles from the eastern portion of Ship Island, and eighty miles from the mouth of Pass-a-l'outre of the of the Mississippi River. Miss., by the National gunboats New London, Jackson, and Lewis. When off Pass Christian they were attacked by the rebel steamers Oregon, Pamlico, and Carondelet, but succeeded in driving them off, seriously damaging them.--(Doc. 117.) The schooner Resolution, having on board a party of rebels, attempting to escape into the confederate lines, was captured in Back River, Md., this day.--Baltimore American. This morning a spirited cannonade took place between some of the Union batteries near Point Pleasant, Mo., and a rebel one on the opposite shore. After an hour's firing, a shell fell inside a large warehouse near
of the United States Senate made a report to-day on the resolution instructing them to inquire into the allegations of disloyalty made against Senator Starke, of Oregon, whose case had occupied the Senate some time, but resulted in his admission as Senator. The special committee considered the same evidence that was before the Cength in reply. In this he assumed that he was loyal, and intimated that the committee had better inquire into the character and allegations of his assailants in Oregon. The committee arrived at the following conclusions: First. That for many months prior to the twenty-first of November, 1861, and up to that time, Mr. Starketo the Southern Confederacy under that Constitution, as the only means of peace, and warmly avowing his sympathy with that cause. Third. That the Senator from Oregon is disloyal to the Government of the United States. The first boat-load of cotton and tobacco from the Tennessee River since the commencement of the rebellio
ally appeared, but as she evinced a disinclination to come out into the roadstead, and the National vessels were equally disinclined to go up to her, the combat ceased. The scene was an exciting one for some time, and was witnessed by President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton.--(Doc. 26.) Messrs. Richardson, Knapp, and Robinson, of Illinois; Law and Voorhees, of Indiana; Allen, White, Noble, Pendleton, Morris, and Vallandigham, of Ohio; Johnson and Ancona, of Pennsylvania, and Shields of Oregon, issued an address to the Democracy of the United States, setting forth party organization as a positive good and essential to the preservation of public liberty.--Cincinnati Gazette, May 9. Four companies of the Seventh Illinois cavalry, under command of Major Aplington, when reconnoitring within a mile and a half of Corinth, Miss., discovered two rebel regiments of infantry in position on both sides of the road. Major Aplington gallantly charged upon them, but fell pierced by a ball
October 2. Yesterday President Lincoln, accompanied by Major-General McClernand, of the army of the West, and others, visited Harper's Ferry, Va. In the rebel House of Representatives, Mr. Foote reported a set of resolutions, the title of which was as follows: Joint resolutions recognizing the practical neutrality of the States of California and Oregon, and of the Territories of Washington and Nevada, suggesting the advantages which would result to the people thereof upon an immediate assertion on their part of their independence of the United States; and proposing, upon their so doing, the formation of a league, offensive and defensive, between said States and Territories and the confederate States of America. A fight took place near Olive Hill, Ky., between the home guards of Carter County and a thousand rebels under the guerrilla Morgan. Morgan commenced the attack, but, after several hours' skirmishing, he was repulsed, losing several of his men. He retreated towa