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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,126 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 528 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 402 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 296 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 246 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 230 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 214 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 180 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) or search for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Dec. 18. The bill for arming the State of North Carolina passed the Senate, after considerable debate, by a vote of forty-one to three. The Commissioners from Alabama and Mississippi have arrived at Raleigh.--Herald, Dec. 19. Senator Crittenden, of Kentucky, offered a resolution in the Senate for certain amendments to the Constitution, which would practically reestablish the Missouri Compromise, prevent the interference of Congress with slavery in the States, and provide for the faithful performance of the Fugitive Slave Law.--N. Y. Times, Dec. 19.
Dec. 19. A meeting of members of the Georgia Legislature, favoring cooperation, was held at Milledgeville. A convention of Southern States desiring cooperation was urged, and an address to the people of South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida, was issued.--Tribune, Dec. 20. A bill has been introduced into the Legislature of North Carolina, providing that No ordinance of said Convention, dissolving the connection of the State of North Carolina with the Federal Government, or connecting it with any other, shall have any force or validity until it shall have been submitted to, and ratified by, a majority of the qualified voters of the State for members of the General Assembly, to whom it shall be submitted for their approval or rejection. --Evening Post, Dec. 20. The Commissioner from Mississippi to Maryland addressed the citizens of Baltimore this evening. In the course of his remarks upon the intentions of the seceding States, he said: Secession i
d at Charleston from Savannah, and yesterday tendered their services to the Governor of the State, under the name of the Minute Men, or Sons of the South.--Charleston Courier. The disbursing clerk in charge of the Indian Trust Fund, at Washington, was detected in embezzling a large amount of State bonds and coupons belonging to that fund. The sum is estimated at $830,000. The Secretary of State first discovered the defalcation, and telegraphed to Secretary Thompson (who was then in North Carolina as Commissioner from Mississippi to recommend secession) to return to Washington immediately. The Secretary arrived on Saturday evening, and had an interview with the President. In company with the Secretary of State, the Attorney-General, and District Attorney Ould, he then proceeded to make an investigation. Bailey, the defaulter, was absent from his office, and the key of the safe was missing; but entrance, was obtained by force, and a large sum in bonds was found to have disappear
Anderson's communications are cut off; that Fort Moultrie has been completely repaired and the guns remounted; and that every thing is in readiness to open a fire on Major Anderson. New batteries are being erected around him by the secessionists.--N. Y. Times. In New York city an assembly of the people in the City Hall Park fire 100 guns in honor of Major Anderson. Five thousand citizens of Baltimore have signed a letter addressed to Governor Hicks, of Maryland, approving his course in refusing to convene the Legislature of that State. The list is headed by John P. Kennedy, Mr. Fillmore's Secretary of the Navy, and comprises the names of nine-tenths of the business men of the city. Calls for public meetings to sustain the Governor are now being issued all over the State.--Baltimore American. Governor Ellis, of North Carolina, dispatched troops to seize upon Fort Macon, at Beaufort, the forts at Wilmington, and the United States arsenal at Fayetteville.--Times, Jan. 3.
avis, of Mississippi, withdrew from the Senate at Washington today. The ordinance of secession having passed the Convention of his State, he felt obliged to obey the summons, and retire from all official connection with the Federal Government.--(Doc. 23.) At the Brooklyn, N. Y., navy yard, the entire force was put under arms, and held in readiness to act immediately, through some apprehension of an attack by an organized force of persons in sympathy with secession. The guns of the North Carolina were shotted, and a portion of the Brooklyn city military was mustered to cooperate.--Herald, Jan. 22. The Georgia State Convention resolved, unanimously: As a response to the resolutions of the Legislature of the State of New York, that this Convention highly approves of the energetic and patriotic conduct of the Governor of Georgia in taking possession of Fort Pulaski by the Georgia troops; that this Convention request him to hold possession of said fort until the relations of
Feb. 4. The Montgomery convention organized with Howell Cobb, president, and Johnson F. Hooper, secretary.--(Doc. 32.) The North Carolina House of Representatives passed unanimously a declaration that if reconciliation fails, North Carolina will go with the other slave States.--Times, Feb. 6. Feb. 4. The Montgomery convention organized with Howell Cobb, president, and Johnson F. Hooper, secretary.--(Doc. 32.) The North Carolina House of Representatives passed unanimously a declaration that if reconciliation fails, North Carolina will go with the other slave States.--Times, Feb. 6.
e powers at Washington for any such use or purpose as they have in view. Your object is to subjugate the southern States, and a requisition made upon me for such an object — an object, in my judgment, not within the purview of the Constitution or the Act of 1795--will not be complied with. You have chosen to inaugurate civil war, and having done so, we will meet it in a spirit as determined as the Administration has exhibited towards the South. --World, April 20. Governor Ellis, of North Carolina, telegraphed the President that he could not respond to the call for troops, as he had doubts of his authority and right to do so. A war bill, with an appropriation of $3,000,000, was passed in the New York Legislature, and signed by the Governor. The Government of the Southern Confederacy called for 32,000 men; 2,000 from Florida, and 5,000 from each of the other States.--Times, April 17. A large meeting of German workingmen was held at Newark, N. J., this evening. An attemp
officers of the army and navy of the Confederate States, and captains sailing under letters of marque, will greatly oblige the proprietors of that paper by furnishing sketches and incidents of the expected conflict between our gallant soldiers and their enemies. When supplied exclusively, a liberal compensation will be allowed. The United States Arsenal at Fayetteville, North Carolina, surrendered to the State authorities. It contains a large number of arms.--Governor Ellis, of North Carolina, called for 30,000 volunteers additional to the regular militia, and all the organized corps are under orders to be in readiness at a moment's notice.--Boston Transcript, April 29. Information was received by Gov. Curtin that Lieut. Jennifer, late of the United States Army, stationed at Carlisle Barracks, Pa., had fled from that place. Gov. Curtin, by aid of the telegraph facilities in his possession, succeeded in having him arrested at Hanover, in York County, Pa. It is said that
eches were made by F. A. Conkling, Chauncey Schaeffer, John Cochrane and others.--N. Y. Tribune, April 27. A Union meeting at Bedford, Westchester county, N. Y., this afternoon, on the occasion of raising the flag, was addressed by Senator Hall, John Jay, Rev. M. Bogg, of the Episcopal Church, Rev. Mr. Ferris, Dr. Woodcock, Dr. Shores, Mr. Hart, Captain of the Bedford company, Mr. Brown, of the Croton Falls Company, and others.--N. Y. Times, April 27. John W. Ellis, governor of North Carolina, issued a proclamation calling an extra session of the General Assembly of the State, and deprecating the proclamation of President Lincoln asking for troops.--(Doc. 103.) The bridges over Gunpowder River on the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad were burned by the rebels of Baltimore. The bridge over Bush River, on the same route, was destroyed last evening about sundown.--N. Y. Herald, April 28. The Baltimore Sun of to-day, has a leader which seems to indicate t
te in the present conflict — it was their duty to support the Government of the United States in this strife between human liberty and freedom against slavery and feudal oppression. M. Fremont offered resolutions tendering the support of French citizens to the United States, but he hoped that the government, if the contest was carried to the extreme, would guarantee the total abolition of slavery.--N. Y. Daily News, April 29. President Lincoln decided that the ports of Virginia and North Carolina should be included in the blockade of the Southern harbors and issued a proclamation to that effect.--(Doc. 110.) Edward Everett delivered an eloquent Union speech, at a flag raising in Chester Square, Boston, Mass.--(Doc. 111.) The Harbor Police of New York seized six sloops in the harbor, laden with powder, which, it was supposed, was intended for the use of Secessionists. On the same day, Capt. Squires, of the Fifteenth Ward Police, seized several pairs of military pantaloo
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