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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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n created by the removal of ordnance to the Southern forts. General William Robinson presided. Resolutions were adopted, declaring loyalty to the Union, deprecating any interference with the shipment of arms under government orders, however inopportune or impolitic the order might appear; deploring the existing state of things in connection with the administration of important departments of the public service, so as to have shaken confidence in the people of the free States; that, while Pennsylvania is on guard at the Federal capital, it is her special duty to look to the fidelity of her sons, and in that view call on the President as a citizen of this Commonwealth, to see that the public receive no detriment at his hands. It behooves the President to purge his cabinet of every man known to give aid and comfort to, or in any way countenancing the revolt of any State against the authority of the constitution and the laws of the Union.--Evening Post, Dec. 28. Captain N. L. Cost
April 9. Governor Curtin, of Pennsylvania, sent a special message to the Legislature to-day, urging the necessity of purchasing arms and reorganizing the military system of that State.--Times, April 10. Jefferson Davis made a requisition on the Governor of Alabama for 3,000 soldiers.--Tribune, April 10. The Charleston Mercury of to-day announces war as declared. Our authorities, it says, yesterday evening received notice from Lincoln's Government, through a special messenger from Washington, that an effort will be made to supply Fort Sumter with provisions and that if this were permitted, no attempt would be made to reinforce it with men! This message comes simultaneously with a fleet, which we understand is now off our bar, waiting for daylight and tide to make the effort threatened. We have patiently submitted to the insolent military domination of a handful of men in our bay for over three months after the declaration of our independence of the United Sta
company has not been within the walls of the capitol before since the war of 1812. The oath of fidelity was administered to several companies of volunteers to-day.--World, April 12. Unusual activity now prevails in military circles in Pennsylvania. New companies are forming, and the old organizations are drilling frequently. The prospect of active service in the event of the breaking out of actual hostilities in the South, is exciting much discussion among the volunteer companies, andunderstood that several have already tendered their services to the Secretary of War, in case the Government should need their aid. It is also understood that in the event of an attack on the Government, the latter will make an early call upon Pennsylvania for men. Our volunteers labor under great disadvantages in respect to arms, and in a case of emergency many more men would be forthcoming than there are arms to place in their hands.--Philadelphia Press. This morning the Commissioners of
troops will be first a fire alarm, and secondly after an interval of one minute, six taps of the bell, to be repeated four times with intervals.--New Orleans Picayune, April 23. It is now learned by the return of the expedition to relieve Sumter, that a plan was perfected to throw in 300 men and supplies by boats at daylight on the 13th. This was frustrated, however, by the Baltic running upon Rattlesnake shoal on the night of the 12th.--World, April 19. Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania, were added to the Military Department of Washington.--(Doc. 68.)--Times, April 25. A positive announcement that General Scott had resigned his position in the army of the United States and tendered his sword to his native State--Virginia, was made at Montgomery. At Mobile, one hundred guns were fired in honor of his resignation.--Charleston Mercury, April 22. Immense Union meetings were held last night at Auburn, Hudson, Ogdensburgh, Albion, Binghamton, and other towns and vil
the same purpose. The Brandywine bridges and all on the road between Susquehanna and Philadelphia are guarded, and workmen have been sent to repair the bridges destroyed on the Northern Central road.--Phila. Enquirer. Governor Curtin of Pennsylvania issued a proclamation calling a meeting of the State Legislature for the 30th of April, to take into consideration and adopt such measures as the present emergencies may demand. --(Doc. 75.)--Philadelphia Press. A letter was received at Polk, Va., with stores, timber, munitions of war, etc., was burned by the U. S. officers in charge, to prevent its falling into the hands of the Secessionists, who occupied Norfolk and Portsmouth in force under Gen. Taliefero. The U. S. liners Pennsylvania, 74 guns; Delaware, 74; Columbus, * from the N. Y. Tribune. 74; steam frigate Merrimac, 44; frigate Raritan, 45; frigate Columbia, 44; sloop Germantown, 22; sloop Plymouth, 22; brig Dolphin, 8; a powder-boat, and the frigate United Stat
to a third reading the bill to raise a war loan of $1,000,000. Resolutions of thanks to Governor Olden for his activity in raising troops, to President Lincoln for his energetic defence of the Union, and pledging New Jersey to stand by the Union with all her power, were introduced into the Senate by a democrat, and passed by a unanimous vote.--N. Y. Tribune, May 8. The contributions of the people of the North for the war, during the last three weeks amount to the sum of $23,277,000. Pennsylvania leads the column with a free gift of $3, 500,000. New York and Ohio have each given $3,000,000; Connecticut and Illinois each $2,000,000; Maine, $1,300,000; Vermont and New Jersey, each $1,000,000; Wisconsin and Rhode Island, $500,000; Iowa, $100,000. The contributions of the principal cities are: New York, $2,173,000; Philadelphia, $330,000; Boston, $186,000; Brooklyn, $75,000; Buffalo, $110,000; Cincinnati, $280,000; Detroit, $50,000; Hartford, $64,000.--(Doc. 141.) The Twentieth
e the control of the forces of the Confederate States in Virginia, and assign them to such duties as you may indicate, until further orders; for which this will be your authority. I. P. Walker, Secretary of War. --National Intelligencer, May 15. The Charleston News of this day contains the prayer of the Rev. James Bardwell, at the opening of the Tennessee Legislature on the 25th of April.--(Doc. 149.) In addition to the new Military Departments of Washington, Annapolis, and Pennsylvania, the States of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois will constitute a fourth, subdivided into several others, to be called the Department of the Ohio. Major-General McClellan, Ohio Volunteers, is assigned to its command; headquarters, Cincinnati. The President, by general orders, directs that all officers of the army, except those who have entered service since 1st April, take and subscribe anew the oath of allegiance to the United States, as set forth in the 10th article of war.--N. Y. Evening
ael Quinn of Virginia, late Chief Engineer in the Navy, superintended the repairs of the Mississippi. He recently resigned, returned to Virginia, and his name was stricken from the Navy roll.--N. Y. Tribune, May 24. The First and Second Regiments of the Ohio volunteers, numbering together eighteen hundred men, and under the command respectively of Colonels McCook and Wilson, reached Washington. It has been several weeks since they left home, having been in the mean time encamped in Pennsylvania--first at Lancaster, and afterwards near Philadelphia. They left the latter city early yesterday morning, on the railroad, coming by way of Baltimore.--(Doc. 190 1/2.) An immense dry-dock was anchored at night in the Pensacola channel east of Fort Pickens by the rebels, who had intended, however, to anchor it elsewhere. Gen. Brown, in command at the fort, forbade its further removal. Its anchorage between Forts Pickens and McRae was for some time contemplated.--New Orleans Delta,
s are selected with a view to privacy and remoteness from the inquisitive eyes of the watchman. Careful espionage may bring to light the object of these nocturnal consultations. The Twentieth, Twenty-first, and Twenty-fourth Regiments of Pennsylvania militia left Philadelphia for Chambersburg.--N. Y. Commercial, May 30. Colonel Mann's Regiment of Pennsylvania militia, arrived at Easton, Pa., and went into camp.--(Doc. 214.) The American citizens in Paris favorable to the Union Pennsylvania militia, arrived at Easton, Pa., and went into camp.--(Doc. 214.) The American citizens in Paris favorable to the Union breakfasted together in the Hotel du Louvre. About one hundred and fifty attended, of whom one-third were ladies, including the wife of General Scott. Mr. Cowdin presided. Resolutions were adopted, pledging the meeting to maintain the Union under any circumstances. Mr. Dayton, the U. S. Minister, said that, since his arrival in France, he could detect no unfriendly feeling on the part of France to the United States, and certainly no French citizen would be found among the privateersmen. He e
officers' tents, ten baggage wagons, each drawn by six horses, four hospital ambulances, twenty camp stoves, and two brass 12-pound howitzers.--N. Y. World, July 6. A Union meeting was held at the city of Louisiana, Missouri, at which Mr. Charles D. Drake delivered an elaborate speech in defence of the Union and the Constitution.--(Doc. 63.) Pursuant to the call of the President of the United States, Congress assembled at Washington this day in special session. Galusha A. Grow, of Penn., was elected speaker of the House, and took the oath of office, which was administered by Mr. Washburne of Illinois. The President's message was received and read together with reports of the heads of the various departments. The message is brief, and the facts it states are well known; the important points of the document are those which embody the recommendations of the President in relation to the measures to be adopted for the prosecution of the war. Compromise by Congress he regards a
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