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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 191 results in 154 document sections:

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April 18. Governor Harris, of Tennessee, replies to President Lincoln's call for two regiments of troops, by saying that Tennessee will not furnish a single man for coercion, but fifty thousand, if necessary, for the defence of our rights or those of our Southern brothers. --Louisville Democrat, April 21. Governor JacksTennessee will not furnish a single man for coercion, but fifty thousand, if necessary, for the defence of our rights or those of our Southern brothers. --Louisville Democrat, April 21. Governor Jackson, of Missouri, answers Secretary Cameron by telling him that his requisition is illegal, unconstitutional, revolutionary, inhuman, diabolical, and cannot be complied with. Missouri won't furnish a single man for such an unholy crusade.--Charleston Mercury, April 19. John Bell, Niell S. Brown, Bailie Payton, and eight other citizens of Tennessee, issued an address calling upon the people of that State to maintain a position of independence in the present struggle, taking sides with the union and peace of the country against all assailants, whether from the North or the South.--(Doc. 61 1/2.) The Common Council of Boston appropriated $100,000 to p
rt House in New York.--Tribune, April 22. Union meetings were held at Schenectady, Hudson, Utica, Waverley, and Dunkirk, N. Y; Stockbridge. Mass.; Bridgeport, Conn.; Springfield and Chicago, Ill. During the proceedings at Chicago, at the suggestion of Judge Mannierre, the whole audience raised their right hands and took the oath of allegiance to the Union, repeating the oath after the Judge.--Detroit Free Press. A Southern merchant writes to a correspondent in New York: ---, Tenn., April 20, 1861. Gentlemen: Our note to you for $187 12100, due to-day, has not been paid. We deeply regret the necessity that impels us to say, that during the existence of this war we are determined to pay no notes due our northern friends.--Evening Post. The St. Nicholas, a steamer plying between Washington and Baltimore, was seized at the former place this morning for prudential purposes.--National Intelligencer. Hiram Sibley, President of the Western Union, and T. R. Wa
the complete surrender of the North, and the concession of everything that might be demanded at their hands.--(Doc. 81.) Andrew Johnson, U. S. Senator from Tennessee, passed through Lynchburg, Va., on his way from Washington to Tennessee. A large crowd assembled and groaned at him. They offered every indignity, and efforts wTennessee. A large crowd assembled and groaned at him. They offered every indignity, and efforts were made to take him off the cars. Mr. Johnson was protected by the conductor and others. He denied sending a message asserting that Tennessee should furnish her quota of men.--Commercial Advertiser, April 26. The citizens of Baltimore were fearfully excited on account of a rumored descent upon them by Federal troops from CoTennessee should furnish her quota of men.--Commercial Advertiser, April 26. The citizens of Baltimore were fearfully excited on account of a rumored descent upon them by Federal troops from Cockeysville, seventeen miles distant from the city; but at night the excitement subsided on receiving intelligence that the troops had been turned back to Harrisburg, Pa., by order of Gen. Scott.--N. Y. Tribune, April 26. In nearly all the churches in New York — and probably in a majority of churches through-out the country — t
n appointed by the Richmond Convention as delegates to the Montgomery Congress from Virginia.--Montgomery (Ala.) Post, May 1. By order of Governor Harris of Tennessee, seventy-five thousand dollars' worth of Tennessee bonds and five thousand dollars in cash, belonging to the United States, which were in possession of the ColleTennessee bonds and five thousand dollars in cash, belonging to the United States, which were in possession of the Collector at Nashville, were seized by the State authorities. The seizure was conditional, the property to be held in trust until the Government restores the property of the State and its citizens, involved in the seizure of the steamer Hillman by troops of the Federal Government. The steamer Hillman was seized at Cairo, by the Illipany, from Nashville, Tennessee, offered their services to the Confederate States.--Charleston Mercury, April 30. At New Orleans, La., the steamships Texas, Tennessee, and the G. W. Hewes, the property of Charles Morgan, Esq., were taken possession of by order of Gov. Moore. Captain Warren of the steam-tug Tuscarora, who was a
States troops from Carlisle barracks, arrived at Washington at 10 o'clock, on the evening of Thursday, April 18th, and bivouacked at the capitol.--N. Y. Times, April 19. Isham G. Harris, Governor, sent a message to the General Assembly of Tennessee, announcing the formation of a military league between that State and the Confederate States; submitting the plan of the league, the joint resolution ratifying it, and a declaration of independence and ordinance dissolving the Federal relations the evening of Thursday, April 18th, and bivouacked at the capitol.--N. Y. Times, April 19. Isham G. Harris, Governor, sent a message to the General Assembly of Tennessee, announcing the formation of a military league between that State and the Confederate States; submitting the plan of the league, the joint resolution ratifying it, and a declaration of independence and ordinance dissolving the Federal relations between the State of Tennessee and the United States of America. --(Doc. 144.)
May 27. Emerson Etheridge, of Tennessee, addressed the citizens of Louisville, Ky., on the great questions which are dividing the South at the present time. He commenced his address with an allusion to the distracted condition of the country, congratulating himself and his audience that he stood upon Kentucky soil, a State that was yet loyal to the Union. He clearly proclaimed himself for his country, first, last, and forever. Having but recently come from a State in which anarchy reigned supreme, he could the better appreciate the blessings of political liberty which were yet vouchsafed to Kentuckians, and which he felt Kentuckians had the patriotism, the gallantry, and the power to perpetuate. He drew a picture of Kentucky in her proud position as a sister in the Union of the States, of her wealth, of her usefulness as an asylum for the oppressed of both sections of our unhappy and divided country, and of her grandeur in after days when she has safely outridden the storm
ve. Great efforts have also been made for the health, comfort, and supplies of Northern troops. Energy and promptitude have characterized their movements both in Maryland and St. Louis, and their success along the border has so far been complete. They have in the West obtained and secured the great repository of arms for that section, equipped our enemies of St. Louis, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, leaving the resistance men of Missouri poorly proivded, Kentucky unarmed and overawed, and Tennessee also, with a meagre provision for fighting, dependent on the Cotton States for weapons of defence. Maryland has been cowed and overpowered, Washington rendered as secure as may be, while Virginia is invaded and Richmond threatened with capture. In all this the military proceedings of the North, since the fall of Sumter, have been eminently wise. For the purpose of overpowering, disheartening, and gaining the first advantages, which, both at home and abroad, are of immense importance, th
e disunion army. Otherwise he escapes immediate service.--Washington Star, June 6. The Ninth Regiment N. Y. V., Colonel Hawkins, left Net York for Fortress Monroe.--(Doc. 235.) The Richmond Whig (Va.) of to-day announces that after to-day no passports will be issued to persons leaving the State, and no one will be admitted to the State except for reasons of peculiar force; also, that the Tennessee volunteers in Virginia are authorized to vote on the ordinance of the secession of Tennessee, although stationed in Virginia.--A Bank Convention, held at Atlanta, Ga., recommended that all the Southern banks, railroads, and tax collectors, receive the Treasury notes of the Confederacy as currency, and both States, cities, and corporations having coupons payable at New York, to appoint the place of payment South.--N. Y. Herald, June 10. About eight o'clock this morning the steamer Harriet Lane, under the command of Capt. Faunce, United States Navy, proceeded up the James River
d Augusta in Georgia; at St. Augustine in Florida; at Mobile in Alabama; at Bay St. Louis, Pass Christian, Sulphur Springs, Vicksburg, and Natchez in Mississippi; at Fort Smith, Helena, and Little Rock in Arkansas; at Marksville, and Memphis in Tennessee; at Galveston, New Braunfels, San Antonio, Brownsville, and Liberty in Texas; and at St. Michael's Grand Coteau, Vermillionville, Thibodeaux, Donaldsonville, Natchitoches, Avoyelles, Alexandria, Shreveport, Iberville, Algiers, and New Orleans ied by J. J. Crittenden, Jas. Guthrie and others, members of the Border State Convention, lately in session at Frankfort, Ky., were published. Only the States of Kentucky and Missouri were represented; one gentleman was irregularly present from Tennessee. To the people of the United States the Convention says that, in its opinion, the obligation exists to maintain the Constitution of the United States and to preserve the Union unimpaired ; and suggests that something ought to be done to quiet
June 19. The probabilities are, that the next few days will witness the most momentous developments in the history of the continent. The aspect of affairs in Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri betokens the proximity of a crisis — of collisions upon the result of which depends much of the future. The preparations on the border, on both sides, indicate movements which may determine, and will be certain largely to influence, the result of the controversy between the hoight hundred. The uniform is of gray cloth, and they are well armed and equipped. Many of the regiment served in Mexico, and Col. Rogers was a captain in that war, and distinguished as an efficient officer.--(Doc. 20.) Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee, arrived at Cincinnati, en route to Washington. He was escorted across the Ohio, by the Newport and Covington Military, and a large concourse of citizens. At 3 o'clock he was formally waited upon by the Chamber of Commerce, and made a speech
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