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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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ghts; and if the Northern States will not make those amendments, by which these rights shall be secured to us, then we must secure them the best way we can. This question of slavery must be settled now or never. The country has been agitated seriously by it for the past twenty or thirty years. It las been a festering sore upon the body politic; and many remedies having failed, we must try amputation, to bring it to a healthy state. We must have amendments to the Constitution, and if we cannot get them we must set up for ourselves. The secession leaders at Charleston declare no more soldiers shall be sent to the forts in that harbor. A captain of a schooner landed some supplies there a few days since, and was terribly abused for it. He was told it would not be safe for any vessel to attempt it in future. The Governor of Naryland declined to receive the Commissioner from Mississippi to that State, setting forth his reasons in an elaborate Union letter.--(See Document No. 1.)
Dec. 20. The news from Charleston is very unfavorable this morning. Civil war is imminent-peace is impossible, are the utterances which meet the car on every side. There is here no longer any moro hope of peace than of compromise, say the people. The speeches from northwestern representatives have taken us by surprise. Such flaming tirades against disunion, coupled with direct threats of coercion, were not expected from that quarter. It is not deemed impossible that the rich and sarrily, and the people in the streets by hundreds expressed their joy at the secession. Many impromptu speeches were made, and the greatest excitement existed. In the midst of a crowd of over three thousand people, collected in Secession Hall at Charleston this evening, the ordinance of secession was duly signed and sealed by the members of the Convention. The occasion was one of the greatest solemnity at some of its periods, and of the wildest excitement at others.---N. Y. Times, Dec. 21.
e of compromise, telegraphed from Washington an address to the people of that State--(Doc. 5.) At Petersburg, Va., a secession pole, one hundred feet high, erected yesterday on the most prominent street, amid the cheers from a large crowd, and bearing the palmetto flag, was sawed down this morning, just before the dawn of day, by an unknown party, and the flag carried off. There was great excitement when it was known.--N. Y. Daily News, Dec. 24. A company of eighty men arrived at Charleston from Savannah, and yesterday tendered their services to the Governor of the State, under the name of the Minute Men, or Sons of the South.--Charleston Courier. The disbursing clerk in charge of the Indian Trust Fund, at Washington, was detected in embezzling a large amount of State bonds and coupons belonging to that fund. The sum is estimated at $830,000. The Secretary of State first discovered the defalcation, and telegraphed to Secretary Thompson (who was then in North Carolina as
Dec. 26. Fort Moultrie was evacuated to-night. Previous to the evacuation, the guns were spiked and the carriages destroyed by fire. The troops have all been conveyed to Fort Sumter. Major Anderson states that he evacuated the fort in order to allay time discussion about that post, and at the same time strengthen his own position.--(Doc. 7.) The evacuation of the fort commenced a little after sundown. The men were ordered to hold themselves in readiness, with knapsacks packed, at a moed by South Carolina to treat with the Federal Government, arrived in Washington to-day. This evening they have held a consultation with a few friends, among whom was Senator Wigfall, of Texas.--Boston Post. Dec. 27. In the Convention at Charleston, Mr. Rhett offered the following ordinance: First.--That the Conventions of the seceding slaveholding States of the United States unite with South Carolina., land hold a Convention at Montgomery, Ala., for the purpose of forming a Southern C
Dec. 28. Early this afternoon the palmetto flag was raised over the Custom House and Post Office at Charleston; and to-night Castle Pinckney and Fort Moultrie have been taken possession of by the South Carolina military. These forts are held under instructions from Governor Pickens, who authorizes their peaceable possession, for the protection of the government property. Castle Pinckney and Fort Moultrie were held by a very small force, which surrendered without collision.--Times, Dec. 29. An enthusiastic Union meeting was held at Memphis, Tenn., to-day. It was addressed by Hon. Neill S. Brown and others. Resolutions were passed opposing separate State secession; against coercion; and favoring a Convention of the Southern States to demand their rights, and if refused to take immediate action.--Philadelphia Press, Dec. 29. The citizens of Wilmington, Del., fired a salute of twenty-one guns in honor of Major Anderson and his heroic band. Governor Hicks' refusal
has, under counsels of a panic, deserted his post at Fort Moultrie, and, under false pretexts, has transferred his garrison and military stores and supplies to Fort Sumter. The Mercury, more temperately, says: Major Anderson alleges that the movement was made without orders and upon his own responsibility, and that he wasit is due to South Carolina and to good faith that the act of this officer should be repudiated by the Government, and that the troops be removed forthwith from Fort Sumter. --(Doc. 9.) John B. Floyd resigned his position as Secretary of War, owing to the refusal of the President to withdraw the Federal troops from the forts att the act of this officer should be repudiated by the Government, and that the troops be removed forthwith from Fort Sumter. --(Doc. 9.) John B. Floyd resigned his position as Secretary of War, owing to the refusal of the President to withdraw the Federal troops from the forts at Charleston.--(Doc. 10.)--Baltimore Sun, Jan. 1.
he alleged cause of his leaving Mr. Buchanan is, that the latter refuses to recall or order back to Fort Moultrie the gallant Anderson. Floyd asserts that he, some time ago, promised the South Carolina seceders to leave things in the harbor of Charleston undisturbed --in statu quo ante bellum--and that the President gave the same promise. This agreement having been broken by Major Anderson, he insisted upon his returning to Fort Moultrie; and, because the President was unwilling to give that oellum--and that the President gave the same promise. This agreement having been broken by Major Anderson, he insisted upon his returning to Fort Moultrie; and, because the President was unwilling to give that order, he sent in his resignation.--Philadelphia Press, Dec. 31. The South Carolina troops took possession of the arsenal at Charleston. The arsenal contains many thousand arms and military stores. Military preparations are actively and zealously progressing.--Evening Post, Dec. 31.
, That's the talk --Now we will have war --Benjamin's a brick --D — n the abolitionists --Abe Lincoln will never come here. --Times, Jan. 1. General Wool takes strong ground in favor of the Union, of sustaining Anderson in his position at Fort Sumter, and earnestly urges that a firm ground be adopted to put down rebellion. He declares that if Fort Sumter be surrendered to the secessionists, in twenty days two hundred thousand men will be in readiness to take vengeance on all who would bionists --Abe Lincoln will never come here. --Times, Jan. 1. General Wool takes strong ground in favor of the Union, of sustaining Anderson in his position at Fort Sumter, and earnestly urges that a firm ground be adopted to put down rebellion. He declares that if Fort Sumter be surrendered to the secessionists, in twenty days two hundred thousand men will be in readiness to take vengeance on all who would betray the Union into the hands of its enemies.--(Doc. 11.)--Troy Times, Dec. 3
med and organized men ready to strike the blow instantly upon the concerted signal being given.--Times, Jan. 2. At Charleston, the attitude of the Administration is regarded as warlike. A censorship is exercised over the telegraph, and the city is nightly patrolled by the military. It is proposed to starve out the troops at Fort Sumter, and then attack them on rafts with the aid of batteries already erected. There is a battery of earthwork, logs, and sand, on the end of Sullivan's Isltor Colcock notifies ship-masters that all vessels from and for ports outside of South Carolina must enter and clear at Charleston. The Columbia Artillery, numbering 50 men, arrived at 1 o'clock to-day, and proceeded to the harbor. They will use cannon belonging to Charleston.--Boston Transcript, Jan. 2. The South Carolina Convention passed an ordinance to define and punish treason. It declares that in addition to that already declared treason by the General Assembly, treason against
Jan. 2. The steam frigate Brooklyn and another vessel at Norfolk are ordered to be in readiness for immediate departure to Charleston. The secession leaders discovered the intention to start these vessels, and notified their sympathizers at Norfolk to have minute-men ready to seize them if they attempted to go to sea. The Administration is on the watch to prevent it.--Commercial Advertiser. A letter received in Washington from Alabama, states the secession sentiment to be utterly uncod served on the entire line of operations from Vera Cruz to the city of Mexico, directly under the eye of General Scott, who expresses the highest confidence in his genius for command.--Tribune. Intelligence is received in Washington that Fort Sumter is besieged; that all Major Anderson's communications are cut off; that Fort Moultrie has been completely repaired and the guns remounted; and that every thing is in readiness to open a fire on Major Anderson. New batteries are being erected a
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