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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 171 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 84 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 60 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 54 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) or search for Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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1,500 barrels of powder, 300,000 rounds of musket-cartridges, and other munitions of war. There was no defence.--Evening Post, Jan. 7. An appeal to the people of Florida, by the Charleston Mercury, to seize the forts and other defences at Pensacola and Key West, threatens the capture of the California treasure ships by letters of marque and privateers.--(Doc. 13.) Fast-day throughout the United States, by proclamation of the President. It is generally observed.--(Doc. 14.) Fort Morgan, at the entrance of Mobile Bay, was taken this morning by Alabama troops, and is now garrisoned by two hundred men.--The Press, Jan. 5. This evening a workingmen's meeting was held at Cincinnati, Ohio. Speeches were made, and resolutions adopted, declaring that the Union must be preserved in its integrity by the enforcement of the laws in every part of the Union, by whatever means may be necessary; that the remedy for all grievances can be had under the constitution, and that the on
n the State House, cannon were fired, guns fired, etc., and in the evening the whole town was illuminated.--(Doc. 19.)--Evening Post, Jan. 12. Judge Jones, of the United States District Court, this afternoon announced from the windows of the court-room in the custom-house building, at Mobile, that the United States Court for the Southern District of Alabama was adjourned forever. Mr. George M. Brewer, of the same place, gave one hundred cords of wood for the use of the garrison at Fort Morgan, and proffered the services of twenty negro men as laborers on the works.--Mobile Advertiser, Jan. 12. at Richmond, Va., a banquet was given to John B. Floyd, late Secretary of the Navy. That gentleman made a speech, wherein he related a conversation with the President, which he claimed showed a breach of faith on the part of the latter, leading to the former's resignation. He also counselled resistance to Federal coercion. Speeches were made by Lieutenant-Governor Montague, Attorne
culiar interest attaches to the document from the fact that one of Judge Thompson's sons, W. P. Thompson, a young lawyer, resident at Fairmont, is aide-de-camp to Gen. Thomas S. Iaymond, commander of the confederate forces in Western Virginia, and the leader of the first company which marched on Grafton. Another of his sons is also a secessionist, and a private in the same company.--(Doc. 201.) The blockade of Mobile (Ala.) harbor was commenced. The Natchez Courier of to-day says:--Fort Morgan welcomed the blockading fleet by displaying the U. S. flag, with the Union down, from the same staff, and below the confederate flag. Col. A. Duryea was placed in command of the camp near Fortress Monroe, by Major-General Butler.--(Doc. 202.) The Twentieth N. Y. Volunteer Regiment left New York city for the seat of war.--(Doc. 203.) The First Regiment of Virginia Volunteers, Col. Kelly, stationed at Wheeling, Va., left that place at 7 A. M., and moved towards Grafton. Afte
oat Florida, C. S. N., concluded to celebrate Christmas eve by a small set — to with the insolent Lincoln cruiser New London, which was lying off the mouth of the harbor of Mobile, Ala, The Florida ran down to the westward of Sand Island, and challenged the New London to come on, which she did, and for an hour or two a lively cannonade at long two furnished an excitingly interesting exhibition for the entertainment of the great audience which viewed it — the four thousand men who garrison Forts Morgan and Gaines, as well as the crews of the blockading vessels, being the spectators. The Florida could not come to close quarters with the enemy by reason of the shoal water of a bar intervening, and could she have got out it is likely she would have had more than she could attend to with the several blockaders that were lying off in deep water. The engagement was lengthy, and may shots were fired on both sides, and ended by the Now London backing out, as usual. The Florida was not touche
January 20. The Confederate schooner Wilder, from Havana, was captured in Mobile (Ala.) Bay, three miles below Fort Morgan. The schooner, seeing the Union cruiser approach, made for the beach, but had no time to save any thing before the cruiser came within range. The Unionists lowered their launches, boarded the schooner, lowered the colors, and commenced discharging the cargo into their launches within three hundred yards of the beach. Capt. Ward, of the Wilder, says he had set English colors before he left. As regards the fight, he says that the enemy came up in their launches. Some of Capt. William Cottrill's scouts met them and fired a few volleys, but did little or no damage. A despatch was sent to the Captain, who came down at about eight o'clock in the evening with reenforcements, and went into the engagement in good earnest, killing about twenty-five or thirty, that is, all that were in one launch, and some others in another launch. The Unionists fired several
June 29. The British steamer Ann was cut out from under the guns of Fort Morgan, at the mouth of Mobile Bay, by the United States steamer Kanawha. She ran in during the night, passed the blockading fleet, and as it was very dark, she could not be seen by the vessels. Lights had been kept burning on the fort all night, so that she had no trouble in finding the channel. This morning she was discovered by the Susquehanna, within a half-mile of the fort, unloading her cargo into a rebel steamer alongside. The Susquehanna, accompanied by the Kanawha, then got under weigh, and steamed within gunshot and opened fire, which was returned by the fort, and kept up for an hour on both sides. In the mean time the crew deserted the steamer. She was soon discovered to be adrift, and dropped down with the current about a mile, when the Kanawha was ordered to go in and bring her out, which she did under a heavy fire from the fort. The battles of Peach Orchard and Savage's Station,
army, under General Grant, moved on from Champion Hill to the Big Black River, Miss., where a battle was fought with the rebels, under Pemberton, and they were again defeated and driven into their intrenchments around Vicksburgh with great loss of men and munitions of war.--(Doc. 193.) Jackson, Miss., was evacuated by the National forces, belonging to the army of General Grant. The schooner Isabel, attempting to run the blockade at Mobile, was run ashore close under the walls of Fort Morgan, and Master's Mate Dyer, of the R. R. Cuyler, was sent with boats, either to bring her off or burn her. They were just in time to capture sixteen men, being her crew and some passengers. Finding it impossible to get the schooner off, he set fire to her and then pulled for his own ship. By this time the alarm had been given and the rebels in the fort were on the alert. Mr. Dyer, finding that the schooner did not break out in a blaze, as he expected, turned back toward the fort, and effe
January 9. To-day the noted guerrilla McCown and three of his men were captured by the Forrester New York cavalry regiment, reconnoitring in the direction of Sperryville, Va.--A fight took place in Mobile Bay, between the rebels in Fort Morgan and the National gunboats stationed on the blockade. On the discovery, this morning, of a steamer ashore under the guns of the Fort, all the gunboats of the fleet got under way; and, while some repaired to the flag-ship for instructions, the Octorara steamed in and opened fire on the rebel craft, which speedily drew a reply from the Fort. The rest of the fleet soon steamed in and took up their positions, when the fire became quite spirited. The rebel steamer was struck several times, and abandoned; but she lay so near the Fort, it was impossible to get her out. Finding the efforts to set her on fire were fruitless, the fleet withdrew, after firing two hours.--A squad of rebel cavalry entered Cleveland, Tenn., and conscripted every man