Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for October 9th or search for October 9th in all documents.

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a solitary halt of half an hour at Lewisburgh. During the night we had been reenforced by the Third brigade, Colonel Low commanding. From the hill overlooking the town of Pulaski, the rear of the rebel column was seen passing out the far side, on the Lamb's Ferry road. The sun had set: a long and fatiguing march had been made during the day, and rest for man and horse was necessary, and the command went into camp on Richland Creek. Colonel Low's command had the advance next day, October ninth, and the Second brigade the rear; consequently, I can write very little of the day's march. A brigade of the enemy had been strongly posted behind a double barricade near Sugar Creek, about twenty miles from Pulaski, and some distance from the Tennessee River. Colonel Low's command gallantly carried the barricades, taking a large number of prisoners, and killing and wounding several, with the loss of two men wounded. I believe from there the road to the ferry was clear. Arriving at Ro
tomac, October 24, 1863. Captain L. G. Estes, A. A. G. Third Division: In compliance with instructions received from the General commanding the division, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my command, from October ninth to October twenty-third, 1863: On the night of October ninth, my picket line, which extended along the north bank of Robertson River, in the vicinity of James City, was attacked, and a portion of the line forced back upon the reserves; at October ninth, my picket line, which extended along the north bank of Robertson River, in the vicinity of James City, was attacked, and a portion of the line forced back upon the reserves; at the same time my scouts informed me that the enemy was moving in heavy column toward my right; this report was confirmed by deserters. In anticipation of an attack by the enemy at daybreak, I ordered my entire command to be saddled at three A. M. on the tenth. At daylight the enemy began by cautiously feeling my line; but seeing his inability to surprise us, he contented himself with obtaining possession of Cedar Mountain, which point he afterward used as a signal station. At one P. M. I rec
Doc. 216.-the pursuit of Shelby. Gen. John McNeil's report. headquarters Frontier District, Fort Smith, November 1, 1863. General: I have the honor to report the following facts as the result of the expedition, to the command of which I was verbally ordered at St. Louis on the ninth of October: I arrived at Lebanon on the twelfth, and finding that Lieutenant-Colonel Quin Morton had marched to Linn Creek with a detachment of the Twenty-third Missouri infantry volunteers, and another of the Second Wisconsin cavalry, and that he expected to be joined by a detachment of the Sixth and Eighth cavalry, Missouri State militia, I ordered Major Eno, in command, to fall back on Lebanon, and proceeded to Buffalo, where I found Colonel John Edwards, Eighteenth Iowa volunteers, in command, with a few cavalry and some enrolled militia. I at once addressed myself to the work of concentrating force enough for pursuit when the enemy should cross the Osage on his retreat south. With