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arcely likely to be interested in minute details of the organization of the army, but perhaps it will be convenient to have a roster by corps and divisions, at least. First corps--Major-General Reynolds. after General Reynolds's death, General Newton was assigned by General Meade to the command of this corps. First division,Gen. Wadsworth. Second division,Gen. Doubleday. Third division,Gen. Robinson. Second corps--Major-General Hancock. First division,Gen. Caldwell. Second divisiselled to fall back and re-form, behind the line originally desired to be held. In the mean time, perceiving the great exertions of the enemy, the Sixth corps, Major-General Sedgwick, and part of the First corps, to which I had assigned Major-General Newton, particularly Lockwood's Maryland brigade, together with detachments from the Second corps, were all brought up at different periods, and succeeded, together with a gallant resistance of the Fifth corps, in checking and finally repulsing t
Vermont, deployed as skirmishers, and still further on the right was General Custer's brigade, the First, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Michigan regiments. Two companies — D, Lieutenant Cummings, and A, Lieutenant Edwards of the First Vermont, were deployed as skirmishers in the town. They advanced through a wheat-field, drove the enemy from a fence on their front, when they were recalled to form in the rearguard. They lost fourteen men. Companies L, E, and F, under Captain Schofield and Lieutenant Newton, were deployed to the right of the town, company I, Lieutenant Caldwell, acting as a reserve force. L and E made one charge in skirmish line, and carried a house from behind which the enemy had annoyed our line seriously. These four companies lost fifteen men. The remainder of the Vermont regiment was held in reserve. It appears that the head of one of the enemy's columns, composed of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, had just entered Hagerstown as General Kilpatrick reached there.
nnock on the evening of the second of May, until it recrossed on the night of the fourth and fifth of May. The division crossed the river early in the evening of the second, and about twelve that night I received notice to march in rear of General Newton's division to Fredericksburgh. About three A. M., the rear of General Newton's division marched, and the head of my column reached Hazel Run some time after daylight, uninterrupted except by the troops in front. About eleven o'clock A. M. oGeneral Newton's division marched, and the head of my column reached Hazel Run some time after daylight, uninterrupted except by the troops in front. About eleven o'clock A. M. on the third, I received notice from the commanding officer of the Sixth corps that he was about to attack the enemy's position between Hazel Run and Fredericksburgh, and wished me to assist. I immediately formed three storming columns, the first column commanded by General Neill, composed of the Seventh Maine, Lieutenant-Colonel Conner, the Seventy-seventh New-York, Lieutenant-Colonel French, the Thirty-third New-York, Colonel Taylor, and a portion of the Twenty-first New-Jersey, Lieutenant-Col
ports of ships destined for the use of belligerents; and your memorialists would further suggest to your Lordship the importance of endeavoring to secure the assent of the Government of the United States of America, and of other foreign countries, to the adoption of similar regulations in those countries also. All which your memorialists respectfully submit. Signed, Thomas Chilton, Jones, Palmer & Co., Farnworth & Jardine, Thos. & Jas. Harrison, L. H. Macintyre, Potter brothers, Chas. Geo. Cowre & Co., M. J. Sealby, R. Gervin & Co., J. Aikin, Finlay, Campbell & Co., Cropper, Ferguson & Co., J. Campbell, S. R. Graves, Rankin, Gilmore & Co., Rathbone Bros. & Co., James Brown & Co., Liverpool, June 9, 1863. James Poole & Co., W. T. Jacob, Henry Moore & Co., Imrie & Tomlinson, Sampson & Holt, James Barnes, Richard Nicholson & son, W. B. Boadle, J. Prowse & Co., Currie, Newton & Co., Nelson, Alexander & Co., Kendall brothers, C. T. Bowrin & Co., G. H. Fletcher & Co., Alfred Holt.
re to cut off Meade's retreat, whilst Ewell's corps followed on the right flank of the retreating enemy, and would be ready to fall upon his rear when he should be brought to a stand. In furtherance of this plan, Hill left Madison country on or about the eighth instant, and moved toward Sperryville. On the same day Ewell crossed the Rapidan at Raccoon Ford. At this place occurred the first cavalry fight, in which we drove the enemy back, but not without sustaining considerable loss. Here Newton and other gallant officers fell. Meade having apparently seen through the designs of General Lee, began his retreat simultaneously with our advance, and, having the benefit of the railroad, and moving on a direct line, it is no matter of surprise that he managed to frustrate them. On Sunday, Hampton's cavalry, under the immediate command of Stuart, moving in advance of Ewell's corps, reached Culpeper Court-House, and, moving along the railroad, encountered the enemy at Brandy Station.
hey had a series of works, leaving only Stuart to demonstrate upon our right, north of the river. This, then, was the position of the forces on Saturday night at dark, with every prospect of a bloody fight on the coming day. Buford was at Germania, the First and Sixth corps extending from Raccoon Ford to Cedar Run; Kilpatrick, supported by the Second and Third corps, to the west of Culpeper, from three to four miles distant. Ewell had moved back from his position in the morning, and faced Newton and Sedgwick, while Stuart fronted French, Warren, and Kilpatrick in the vicinity of Bethel Church. On Sunday morning at two o'clock our infantry force, both at the Rapidan and west of town, commenced moving toward the Rappahannock, their trains having all been sent back the night before, leaving the entire cavalry of Pleasanton to cover the retreat. Gregg had come up by forced marches during Saturday; so our cavalry force was by no means insignificant. Our infantry all reached their pr