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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
lay before him. The vessels which had been assigned to his command soon began to arrive, and by the middle of March all had reported, together with six steamers belonging to the mortar-flotilla: the Harriet Lane, Owasco, Clifton, Westfield, Miami, Jackson; besides the mortar-schooners. The frigate Colorado, mounting fifty guns, had arrived, but Flag-Officer Farragut and Captain Bailey both came to the conclusion that she could not be lightened sufficiently to cross the bar. On the 18th of March all the mortar-schooners crossed the bar at Pass à l'outre, towed by the steamers Harriet Lane, Owasco, Westfield, and Clifton. They were ordered by Farragut to proceed to South-west Pass. As yet the only ships that had crossed the bar were the Hartford and Brooklyn. The Navy Department had made a mistake in sending vessels of too great draught of water, such as the Colorado, Pensacola, and Mississippi. The two latter succeeded in crossing with great difficulty, but the whole fleet
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
ere to the York River expedition, under General W. B. Franklin, which McClellan dispatched from Yorktown on the 5th with instructions to seize and hold a landing near West Point, situated at the confluence of the York and Pamunkey rivers, and the terminus of the Richmond and York River Railroad. This movement on West Point, if successful, would secure the so-called Urbana route of communications, the advantages of which are explained in McClellan's letter to the War Department of March 19th,, 18 62. Franklin moved up the York River on the 6th, his troops in transports and under convoy of a, number of gun-boats, and made a landing the same day. General Franklin, in a letter on this subject, dated November 25th, 1881, says: My instructions were to await orders after landing, and not to advance. . . . We were attacked on the 7th, the object of the enemy being to drive us into the river. We had not made any attempt to advance, as such an attempt would have been in conflict with my