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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 718 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 564 12 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 458 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 458 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 376 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 306 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 280 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 279 23 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 237 5 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 216 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Fitz Lee or search for Fitz Lee in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
ster from her 8-inch guns, and finally drove her out of action in a disabled condition and in flames. According to the testimony of Captain Philips, of the Stonewall Jackson, the shock which she received in striking the Varuna shifted the boiler and broke the steam-pipe connections, thus disabling the vessel.--Editors. But the career of the Varuna was ended; she began to fill rapidly, and her gallant commander was obliged to run her into shoal water, where she soon went to the bottom. Captain Lee, of the Oneida, seeing that his companion needed assistance, went to his relief, and rescued the officers and men of the Varuna. The two Confederate rams were set on fire by their crews and abandoned. Great gallantry was displayed on both sides during the conflict of these smaller steamers, which really bore the brunt of the battle, and the Union commanders showed great skill in managing their vessels. Bailey's division may be said to have swept everything before it. The Pensacola, w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan organizing the grand Army. (search)
ree-quarters of the Federal capital. It was in the midst of this herculean task of organization that two French aides-de-camp were assigned to duty as military attaches on McClellan's staff. His brilliant operations in Western Virginia against Lee,--who had not yet revealed the full extent of his military genius, and whom McClellan was destined to find again in his front but a year later,--the successes of Laurel Hill and Rich Mountain, gave evidence of what might be expected of the inexpertaff the exacting confidence of the people and the Government was laying on him an almost superhuman task. In forging the puissant weapon which, later, snatched from his grasp, was destined, in the hands of the Great Hammerer, to bray the army of Lee, he acquired an imperishable title to the gratitude of his compatriots. He wrought, will it be said, for the glory of his successors? No! He labored for his country, even as a private soldier who dies for her, with no thought of fame. In order
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
me to do, was postponed almost twenty hours--the putting General Lee, who was near, in command of the army. General Johnst General Pickett as he was retiring, under the orders of General Lee, to resume our former position. Without dwelling upo. M., and returned to the Williamsburg road. I wrote to General Lee, who was stationed in Richmond, in general charge of mil orders I had given. In reply, dated 5 A. M., June 1st, General Lee says: Your movements are judicious, and determination toh the exclamation, Oh, that I had ten thousand men more, General Lee had just taken command of the army. He seemed very mucht then on the Williamsburg road, if it ever had been. General Lee gave me no orders that day. The fact that Longstreet's abelieve that this was in compliance with orders given by General Lee to General Longstreet--perhaps for the reason that on Ma symptom of which was manifested within eighteen hours after Lee relieved me of the command of the army. But, for that misfo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stuart's ride around McClellan. (search)
we went out to the Brooke turnpike, preparatory to the march. The column was the 9th Virginia, commanded by Colonel W. H. F. Lee, the 1st Virginia, led, by Colonel Fitz Lee, and the Jeff Davis Legion, under Colonel Martin. A section of the Stuart Horse Artillery, commanded by Captain Pelham, accompanied the expedition. The whoe Federals did not attempt to make a stand until they reached Old Church. Here their officers called a halt, and made an attempt to rally to defend their camp. Fitz Lee soon swept them out, and burned their camp. They made no other attempt to stand, and we heard no more of them as an organized body, but many prisoners were take storey through New Kent County to Tunstall's station, on the York River Railroad. I had been in charge of the Confederate advance-guard up to the time when Colonel Fitz Lee came to the front with the 1st Virginia, relieving the 9th of that duty. When well down in New Kent County, General Stuart; sent for me again to the front.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iii.--characteristics of General Wise. (search)
my tent, and will do so now if you will wait till I pull on my boots! Then he poured a broadside upon his retreating enemy. A few days after this Wise said: General Lee came down to see me; fortunately, my wife and several other ladies were spending the day at my headquarters. We had a good dinner and a charming time. You knoe broken — and remind you that we have both already passed the meridian of life, etc. Seeing he was in for a sermon, and one that I could not answer, I replied: General Lee, you certainly play Washington to perfection, and your whole life is a constant reproach to me. Now I am perfectly willing that Jackson and yourself shall do the praying for the whole army of Northern Virginia; but, in Heaven's name, let me do the cussin‘ for one small brigade. Lee laughed and said, Wise, you are incorrigible, and then rejoined the ladies. Apropos of this a friend told me that, stopping at a farmer's in Appomattox after the surrender, he found the old man deriving com
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iv.--origin of the Lee tomatoes. (search)
Iv.--origin of the Lee tomatoes.by W. Roy Mason, Major, C. S. A. one day in June, 1862, General Lee rode over to General Charles W. Field's headquarters at Meadow Bridge and asked for me. I would say here that on leaving home to enter the Army I carried a family letter of introduction to General Lee; and on account of that, anGeneral Lee; and on account of that, and also my relationship to Colonel Charles Marshall, an aide on his staff, my visits at army headquarters were exceptionally pleasant. When General Lee approached me on this occasion, he said: Captain, can General Field spare you a little while? I replied, Certainly, General; what can I do for you? I have some property, he answerGeneral Lee approached me on this occasion, he said: Captain, can General Field spare you a little while? I replied, Certainly, General; what can I do for you? I have some property, he answered, in the hands of the enemy, and General McClellan has informed me that he would deliver it to me at any time I asked for it. Then, putting aside his jesting manner, he told me that his wife and Miss Mary Lee, his daughter, had been caught within the Federal lines at the White House, the residence of General W. H. F. Lee, his so
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
d body of men was to be found among the Confederates, or any who more strongly believed in their own invincibility. The known presence of President Davis and General Lee, to oversee, direct, encourage, and urge, was another influential power in favor of the Confederates in this movement.--F. J. P. Their general officers, from thd the highest confidence in each other, in the army, and in their own men, and were fully competent to oppose their able adversaries. I have said we did not fear Lee alone at Beaver Dam Creek. Nor, though anxious, did we fear the combined attack of Lee and Jackson at Gaines's Mill. Defeat to us was necessarily great damage to Lee and Jackson at Gaines's Mill. Defeat to us was necessarily great damage to them. Our flanks were secure and could not be turned; though fewer in numbers, the advantages of our position, combined with the firm discipline of our own brave men, overcame the odds. Our adversaries were forced to meet us face to face. All day they struggled desperately for success, and near night, after fearful destruction,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Recollections of a participant in the charge. (search)
her. The gun I had passed, now limbered up, was being hauled off at a gallop. I could direct my horse a little to right or left, and so directed her toward the gun. As she did not attempt to leap the gun, I gained control of her, and at once turned about and started back upon my charge. After riding a short distance I paused. The firing of artillery and infantry behind and of infantry in front was terrific. None but the dead and wounded were around me. It hardly seemed that I could drive Lee's battle-scarred veterans alone, and so I rode slowly off the field. The regiment had only about 250 men in action. Our commissioned officer was the only one not wounded, except some who were captured. Only about 100 returned from that bloody field for duty the next day. Some were captured, but a large number fell in that terrible charge, and sleep with the many heroes who on that day gave their lives for the Union. So far as those of the 5th Regular Cavalry present in this charge were co
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. (search)
Confederate army, I received an order from General Lee to report immediately at his quarters on th a forced passage. During the absence of General Lee, Longstreet said to Jackson: As you have th the battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam, and General Lee had gone to the Rappahannock (we were makin's flank and rear would keep him from attacking Lee. In case of any casualty to himself, the removaichmond; to theNine-mile bridge, near which General Lee was in person, I suppose the distance was as. He must have reached his rendezvous with General Lee and his three major-generals about noon on whom I met told me that this gentleman was General Lee. The conference soon ended, and the march umed — deflecting strongly to the east. General Lee's object in pressing down the Chickahominy till 2:30 P. M. to hear from Longstreet, General Lee in his official report says: The arrival ofis memory also.--D. H. H. During the absence of Lee he kept up such a clatter that each of McClella[16 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.47 (search)
ld again return to the assault. Besides the terrific fire in front, a battery of heavy guns on the south side of the Chickahominy was in full play upon their right flank. There was no opportunity for manoeuvring or flank attacks, as was the case with D. H. Hill on our extreme left. The enemy was directly in front, and he could only be reached in that direction. If he could not be driven out before night it would be equivalent to a Confederate disaster, and would involve the failure of General Lee's whole plan for the relief of Richmond . . . . It was a critical moment for the Confederates, as victory, which involved the relief or the loss of their capital, hung wavering in the balance. Night seemed about to close the account against them, as the sun was now setting upon their gallant, but so far fruitless efforts. While matters were in this condition Whiting's division, after crossing with much difficulty the wooded and marshy ground below Gaines's Mill, arrived in rear of tha
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