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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
w position. Colonel Duffield had also just arrived. He appeared to have behaved well in the attack, and was severely wounded: General orders, no. 32headquarters, army of the Ohio, in camp, Huntsville, Ala., July 21st, 1862. On the 13th instant the force at Murfreesborough, under command of Brigadier-General T. T. Crittenden, late colonel of the 6th Indiana Regiment, and consisting of 6 companies of the 9th Michigan, 9 companies of the 3d Minnesota, 2 sections of Hewett's (Kentucky) ing. General Bragg states in his report that he was ready and desirous for battle at this point and previously after Perryville, and I have no doubt that was true, if he could have had his own terms. His order for withdrawal was announced on the 13th. The pursuit was taken up that night, under the supervision of Thomas, with Crittenden's corps, followed by the other corps. The details afford no interesting or important fact, except that the retreating army was pressed into difficulties whi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The confederate left at Fredericksburg. (search)
he opposite side were waiting their turn to cross. On his return he had gone into a two-story wooden dwelling on the banks of the river, and had taken a leisurely view of the whole surroundings, confirming his observations taken from the mouth of Deep Run. This was a daring reconnoissance, as, at the time, none of our troops were within a mile of him. Up to this time the enemy had not shown us any very large body of troops, either in Fredericksburg, on the opposite side, or below. On the 13th, during the early morning, a thick fog enveloped the town in my front and the valley of the river, but between 9 and 10 o'clock it lifted, and we could see on our right, below Deep Run, long lines of the enemy stretching down the river, and near it, but not in motion. Reconnoitering parties on horseback were examining the grounds in front of our army, coming within range without being fired on. After they retired a strong body of infantry advanced from a point on the river somewhat below my
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Ransom's division at Fredericksburg. (search)
by a second regiment, which halted behind a brick-walled graveyard upon Willis's Hill. [See below.] About sundown Brigadier-General Kemper was brought up, and relieved the 24th North Carolina with two of his regiments and held the others in closer supporting distance. On the 20th of December, 1862, he sent me a list of his casualties, with this note: headquarters, Kemper's Brigade, December 20th, 1862. General: I inclose herewith the statement of the losses of my brigade on the 13th and 14th inst. while acting as part of your command. While a report of my losses has been called for by my permanent division commander, and rendered to him, it has occurred to me that a similar one rendered to y ourself would be proper and acceptable. Permit me to add, General, that our brief service with you was deeply gratifying to myself and to my entire command. I have the honor to be, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. L. Kemper, Brigadier-General. Brig.-Gen. Rans
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 2.15 (search)
next morning was foggy. But it would have been very difficult to make the movement. I was much worried in regard to building the necessary bridges over Hazel Run and the dangers attending a flank movement at night in the presence of the enemy. But the order to march never came. The orders that were given by Burnside showed that he had no fixed plan of battle. After getting in the face of the enemy, his intentions seemed to be continually changing. Early the next morning, Saturday, the 13th, I received orders to make an assault in front. My instructions came from General Sumner, who did not cross the river during the fight, owing to a special understanding with which I had nothing to do, and which related to his supposed rashness. At fair Oaks, Antietam, and on other battle-fields he had shown that he was a hard fighter. He was a grand soldier, full of honor and gallantry, and a man of great determination. Fredericksburg from the east bank of the Rappahannock — I. As
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 3.25 (search)
said: I want to impress upon you two gentlemen in your next fight,--and turning to me he completed the sentence,--put in all of your men--in the long run a good military maxim. The weather growing favorable for military operations, on April 12th were commenced those suggestive preliminaries to all great battles, clearing out the hospitals, inspecting arms, looking after ammunition, shoeing animals, issuing provisions, and making every preparation necessary to an advance. The next day, the 13th, Stoneman was put in motion at the head of ten thousand finely equipped and well organized cavalry to ascend the Rappahannock and, swinging around, to attack the Confederate cavalry wherever it might be found, and Fight! Fight! Fight! At the end of two days march Stoneman found Outline map of the Chancellorsville campaign. The right wing of Hooker's army crossing the Rappahannock at Kelly's Ford. From a War-time sketch. the river so swollen by heavy rains that he was constrained to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
enkins and Rodes to capture McReynolds, who, discovering their approach, withdrew to Winchester. They then pushed on to Martinsburg, and on the 14th drove out the garrison. Smith's infantry crossed the Potomac at Shepherdstown, and made its way to Maryland Heights; his artillery retreated by the Williamsport road, was pursued, and lost five guns. Meanwhile Ewell, with Early's and Edward Johnson's divisions, marched direct on Winchester. Arriving in the neighborhood on the evening of the 13th, he ordered Early on the 14th to leave a brigade in observation on the south of the town, move his main force under cover of the hills to the north-western Map 6: positions June 17th. Map 7: positions June 24th. Map 8: positions June 28th. side, and seize the out-works which commanded the main fort. He also ordered Johnson to deploy his division on the east of the town, so as to divert attention from Early. This was so successfully done that the latter placed, unperceived, twenty gun
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.53 (search)
29: July 14th. Meade, fully alive to the importance of striking Lee before he could cross the Potomac, disregarded this, advanced on the 11th, and on the 12th pushed forward reconnoissances to feel the enemy. After a partial examination made by himself and his chiefs of staff and of engineers, which showed that its flanks could not be turned, and that the line, so far as seen by them, presented no vulnerable points, he determined to make a demonstration in force on the next morning, the 13th, supported by the whole army, and to attack if a prospect of success offered. On assembling his corps commanders, however, he found their opinion so adverse that he postponed it for further examination, after which he issued the order for the next day, the 14th. On advancing that morning, it was found that the enemy had abandoned his line and crossed the river, partly by fording, partly by a new bridge. A careful survey of the enemy's intrenched line after it was abandoned justified the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.58 (search)
The Meade-Sickles controversy. see also the preceding article.--editors. I. A letter from General Meade. headquarters, military division of the Atlantic, Philadelphia, March 16th, 1870. [Private.] [Colonel] G. G. Benedict, Burlington, Vt. dear Sir: I am in receipt of your letter of the 13th inst., as also the copies of the Free press, with editorials and comments on the address of Colonel [W. W.] Grout before the Officers' Society and Legislature of the State. The substance of these editorials in the Burlington Free press will be found in the appendix to the second edition of Colonel Benedict's work, Vermont at Gettysburg.--editors. I have carefully read your articles and feel personally under great obligations to you for the clear and conclusive manner in which you have vindicated the truth of history. I find nothing to correct in your statements except a fact you mention, which is a misapprehension. I did not invite General Humphreys to be my chief-of-sta
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
ving first, and the Fifteenth second. In the evening of May 9th I received, by telegraph, orders to proceed at once to Mississippi and take chief command of the forces there, and to arrange to take with me, for temporary service, or to have follow without delay, three thousand good troops. I replied instantly: Your dispatch of this morning received. I shall go immediately, although unfit for service, and took the first train, which was on the morning of the 10th. At Lake Station, on the 13th, I found a telegram from General Pemberton, dated the; 12th, informing me that the enemy was apparently moving in heavy force on Edwards's depot, which, as he said, will be the battle-field if I can carry forward sufficient force, leaving troops enough to secure the safety of this place [Vicksburg]. This was the first intelligence of the Federal army received from General Pemberton since the first of the month. I arrived in Jackson at nightfall, exhausted by an uninterrupted journey of fo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
to him describing my position and declining to send any troops. I looked upon side movements, as long as the enemy held Port Hudson and Vicksburg, as a waste of time and material. General Joseph E. Johnston arrived at Jackson in the night of the 13th, from Tennessee, and immediately assumed command of all the Confederate troops in Mississippi. I knew he was expecting reenforcements from the south and east. On the 6th I had written to General Halleck, Information from the other side leaves meld admit. Reconnoissances were constantly made from each corps to enable them to acquaint themselves with the most practicable routes from one to another in case a union became necessary. McPherson reached Clinton with the advance early on the 13th, and immediately set to work destroying the railroad. Sherman's advance reached Raymond before the last of McPherson's command had got out of the town. McClernand withdrew from the front of the enemy, at Edwards's Station, with much skill and wi
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