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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,040 1,040 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 90 90 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 56 56 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 55 55 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 40 40 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for July 1st or search for July 1st in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
W. Morgan operating against Cumberland Gap, and give actual possession of east Tennessee, which the mere occupation of Chattanooga would not. Halleck at first assented to my proposition, but a day or two afterward withdrew his consent, and enjoined that the movement should be made directly upon Chattanooga. We crossed the Tennessee by extemporized ferries--three divisions at Florence, arriving at Athens on the Nashville and Decatur Railroad on the 28th of June, and one division between the 1st and 6th of July, by a very inefficient ferry prepared by General Mitchel at Decatur. General Thomas with his division was still detained on the Corinth road under General Halleck's orders, and did not join at Huntsville until the last of July; so that the available effective force for an advance when I reached Huntsville on the 29th of June was between 24,000 and 25,000 men. The 16,000 already in middle Tennessee and north Alabama would still be required to guard Nashville and keep open th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Lee's invasion of Pennsylvania. (search)
g, and the Federals south and south-east of that memorable field. On the 30th of June we turned our faces toward our enemy and marched upon Gettysburg. The Third Corps, under Hill, moved out first and my command followed. We then found ourselves in a very unusual condition: we were almost in the immediate presence of the enemy with our cavalry gone. Stuart was undertaking another wild ride around the Federal army. We knew nothing of Meade's movements further then the report my scout had made. We did not know, except by surmise, when or where to expect to find Meade, nor whether he was lying in wait or advancing. The Confederates moved down the Gettysburg road on June 30th, encountered the Federals on July 1st, and a severe engagement followed. The Federals were driven entirely from the field and forced back through the streets of Gettysburg to Cemetery Hill, which had been previously selected as a Federal rallying-point and was occupied by a reserve force of the Eleventh Corps.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
communication with each other. Lee must then have relied on Robertson or nobody to watch Hooker. Instead of keeping on the right of the army and in close contact with the enemy, as Stuart had ordered, Robertson's command marched on the left by Martinsburg and did not reach the battle-field. The rear-guard of the Federal army moving into Pennsylvania crossed the Potomac on June 26th, east of the Blue Ridge; Robertson crossed at Williamsport, about twenty-five miles to the west of it, on July 1st, the day the fighting began at Gettysburg. When General Lee crossed the Potomac, he left General Robertson between him and the enemy. By July 3d Robertson had so manoeuvred that Lee was between him and the enemy. Stuart had ridden around General Hooker while Robertson was riding around General Lee. If, in accordance with Stuart's instructions, Robertson had promptly followed on the right of the army when the enemy left, Lee's forces would have been concentrated and ready for attack; a d
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
Nearing this place, Pettigrew Map 11: positions July 1st: 8 to 10 A. M. Map 12: positions July 1st: 10:10July 1st: 10:10 to 10:30 A. M. Map 13: positions July 1st: 3:30 P. M. Map 14: positions July 1st: about 4 P. M. discovereJuly 1st: 3:30 P. M. Map 14: positions July 1st: about 4 P. M. discovered the advance of a large Federal force and returned to Cashtown. Hill immediately notified Generals Lee and EJuly 1st: about 4 P. M. discovered the advance of a large Federal force and returned to Cashtown. Hill immediately notified Generals Lee and Ewell, informing the latter that he would advance next morning on Gettysburg. Buford, sending Merritt's brigadrolled the actions of both leaders. At 8 A. M., July 1st, Buford's scouts reported Heth's advance on the Caopening of the battle on the Chambersburg road, on July 1st, is thus described by Captain Newel Cheney, of theoached from the front until daylight next morning, July 1st, when Corporal Alphonse Hodges, of Company F, 9th first shots fired from our side on the morning of July 1st at Gettysburg, and occurred about 5:30 A. M., as nem on this map until after sunset or about dusk of July 1st. See p. 284.--editors. foot of Seminary Ridge, w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.39 (search)
Incidents of the first day at Gettysburg. from a paper read before the District of Columbia Commandery of the loyal Legion, march 2d, 1887.--editors. by E. P. Halstead, Brevet-Major and Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. V. Counting the scars in the colors. Soon after daylight on July 1st, General Reynolds, then at Marsh Run, gave orders to move with all possible dispatch to Gettysburg, where General Buford, with a small division of cavalry, was contending against Heth's division of infantry and vastly superior numbers. The First Corps moved promptly, covered a distance of nearly eight miles, and the First Division, commanded by General Wadsworth, reached the field about 10 o'clock in the forenoon. In returning for the Second and Third divisions I met John Burns in the field east of the Seminary, with an old musket on his shoulder and a powder-horn in his pocket, hurrying to the front, looking terribly earnest. When near me he inquired, Which way are the rebels? W
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Hancock and Howard in the first day's fight. (search)
to that time, and during his convalescence from the wound received near the end of the battle. There are passages in the report which show a determination on the part of Meade to fight at Pipe Creek. General Hancock says: On the morning of July 1st the command marched to Taneytown, going into bivouac about 11 A. M. I then proceeded in person to General Meade's headquarters, and, on reporting to him, was informed as to his intention with reference to giving battle to the enemy, the orders fr, comparing notes and information until a late hour. I then returned to Emmitsburg. A circular from your headquarters, of June 30th, required corps commanders to hold their commands in readiness to move at a moment's notice. . . . At 8 A. M. [July 1st] orders were received from him [Reynolds] directing the corps to march to Gettysburg. . . . As soon as the corps was set in motion, I pushed on with my staff by the direct road, and when within two miles of Gettysburg received word from General
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.42 (search)
ructed to hold their commands in readiness to march against him. The next day, July 1st, Meade wrote to Reynolds that telegraphic intelligence from Couch, and the movs of the problem were in favor of the Pipe Creek line. But Meade's orders for July 1st, drawing his corps toward the threatened flank, carried Reynolds to Gettysburghe Army of the Potomac w as of sterner stuff than that implies. The battle of July 1st changed the situation. Overpowered by numbers, the First and Eleventh corps hade in this decision. In pursuance of his instructions, I had that morning (July 1st) reconnoitered the country behind Pipe Creek for a battle-ground. On my returd it, therefore, and continued it to the end of the battle. At the close of July 1st Johnson's and Anderson's divisions of the Confederate army were up. Ewell's corps. He says: We arrived at Hanover, Pennsylvania, on the afternoon of July 1st. . . . An aide-de-camp came riding along, saying, Boys, keep up good courage,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.47 (search)
arms between the Federal and Confederate troops. during the civil war. The engagement of the 1st of July, brought on by accident, on the part of the Confederates at least, in which two corps of the ir Scotland's spear, And broken was her shield. When the fight began at Gettysburg on the 1st of July, three brigades of Hood's division were at Greenwood on the Chambersburg road and on the westAnd the situation was as follows: The advance of the two armies encountered each other on the 1st of July. An engagement ensued in which the Confederates were victorious. The Federal troops retired The failure of General Ewell to seize Cemetery Hill and adjacent positions, on the evening of July 1st, has been frequently assigned as one of the causes of our loss of the battle. It is very doubtde the attempt, for General Pleasonton has asserted very positively that, on the night of the 1st of July, we [the Federals] had more troops in position than Lee. And General Lee qualified his instr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Kershaw's brigade at Gettysburg. (search)
Kershaw's brigade at Gettysburg. by J. B. Kershaw, Major-General, C. S. A. My brigade, composed of South Carolinians, The 2d, 3d, 7th, 8th and 15th South Carolina regiments, and the 3d South Carolina Battalion.--editors. constituted, with Semmes's, Wofford's, and Barksdale's brigades, the division of Major-General Lafayette McLaws, and that, with the divisions of Pickett and Hood, formed the First Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia, known as Longstreet's. About sunset on the 1st of July we reached the top of the range of hills overlooking Gettysburg, from which could be seen and heard the smoke and din of battle, then raging in the distance. We encamped about midnight two miles from Gettysburg, on the left of the Chambersburg pike. On the 2d we were up and ready to move at 4 A. M., in obedience to orders, but, owing, as we understood at the time, to the occupancy of the road by trains of the Second Corps, Ewell's, did not march until about sunrise. With only a slight
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Lee's right wing at Gettysburg. (search)
t had been left in Virginia; with them he felt that he would have broken the line. While I was trying to persuade General Lee to turn the Federal left on the 1st of July, Halleck telegraphed Meade as follows: Washington, D. C., July 1st, 1863. The movements of the enemy yesterday indicate his intention to either turn yotes from a memorial address the old story of the Rev. W. N. Pendleton: The ground south-west of the town was carefully examined by me after the engagement on July 1st. Being found much less difficult than the steep ascent fronting the troops already up, its practicable character was reported to our commanding general. He infcox Official Records, Vol. XXVII., Part II., pp. 346, 616. we see that the right of General Lee's army was not deployed as far as the Fairfield road on the 1st of July, that General Pendleton did not pass beyond this road, and only noted the location of the ridge on the right from his position on the Fairfield road especially
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