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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 718 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 564 12 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 458 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 458 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 376 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 306 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 280 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 279 23 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 237 5 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 216 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Fitz Lee or search for Fitz Lee in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A bit of partisan service. (search)
t door to get it. I caught hold of his shirt and whispered my name in his ear, and told him to lead me to the general's room. Resistance was useless, and he did so. A light was struck, and before us lay the sleeping general. He quickly raised up in bed and asked what this meant. I said, General, get up — dress quick — you are a prisoner. What! exclaimed the indignant general. My name is Mosby; Stuart's cavalry are in possession of this place, and General Jackson holds Centreville. Is Fitz Lee here? Yes. Then take me to him; we were classmates. Very well; but dress quick. Two of my men assisted him to put on his clothes. My motive in deceiving him in regard to the amount of my force was to deprive him of all hope of rescue. I was in a most critical situation, for in addition to several thousand troops in the surrounding camps, a considerable number were quartered in the houses in the village. If there had been the le ast concert among them they could easily have driven us
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 3.24 (search)
Stoneman's raid in the Chancellorsville campaign. see map, p. 155 of this volume, and also p. 164 of volume II.--editors. The original instructions to General George Stoneman for the cooperation of the cavalry in the Chancellorsville campaign directed him to cross the Rappahannock on the 13th of April, at some point west of the Orange and Alexandria railroad, and throw his whole force, excepting one brigade, between Lee's position on the Rappahannock and his base at Richmond. The object was the isolation of the enemy from his supplies, checking his retreat, and inflicting on him every possible injury which will tend to his discomfiture and defeat. This movement was delayed by heavy rains, and on the 28th of April the instructions were modified. The new plan was to cross the Rappahannock at the fords immediately north-west of Fredericksburg on the evening of the 28th, or the morning of the 29th, and move in two columns, operating on the lines of the Orange and Alexandria and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Stonewall Jackson's last battle. (search)
and the Federal force found here and at Talley's, a mile farther west, was the Eleventh Corps, under General Howard. General Fitz Lee, with cavalry scouts, had advanced until he had view of the position of Howard's corps, and found them unsuspicious of attack. Reaching the Orange Plank road, General Jackson himself rode with Fitz Lee to reconnoiter the position of Howard, and then sent the Stonewall brigade of Virginia troops, under Brigadier-General Paxton, to hold the point where the German Had they not seen and cheered, as long and as loud as they were permitted, the gay-hearted Stuart and the long-bearded Fitz Lee on his fiery charger? Was not Crutchfield's array of brass and iron dogs of war at hand, with Poague and Palmer, and alrates in Jackson's place. A dispatch was sent to the commanding general to announce formally his disability,--tidings General Lee had received during the night with profound grief. There came back the following note: General: I have just recei
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A reply to General Longstreet. (search)
IV., p. 214; and Long's Memoirs of Lee. ) Fourth. General Longstreet would have us infer that he was not ordered by General Lee to attack early on the second day; but that his memory is at fault on this point has been abundantly shown by Generals Fitz Lee, Pendleton, Early, Wilcox, and many others. No testimony on this point is more direct and conclusive than that of General A. L. Long, then military secretary to General Lee. He says in his recently published Memoirs of R. E. Lee (page 277General Lee. He says in his recently published Memoirs of R. E. Lee (page 277), that on the evening of the 1st, when General Lee had decided not to renew the attack on Cemetery Hill that day, he said (in Long's presence) to Longstreet and Hill: Gentlemen, we will attack the enemy in the morning as early as practicable. Long continues: In the conversation that succeeded he [Lee] directed them to make the necessary preparations and be ready for prompt action the next day. Long shows plainly that General Lee's design was to attack the troops in front before the whole Fed
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
bridge Art'y), Lieut. Samuel Wallace; Va. Battery, Capt. M. Johnson. Battalion loss: k, 7; w, 25 = 32. Pegram's Battalion, Maj. W. J. Pegram, Capt. E. B. Brunson: S. C. Battery (Pee Dee Art'y), Lieut. William E. Zimmerman; Va. Battery (Crenshaw),----; Va. Battery (Fredericksburg Art'y), Capt. E. A. Marye; Va. Battery, (Letcher Art'y), Capt. T. A. Brander; Va. Battery (Purcell Art'y), Capt. Joseph McGraw. Battalion loss: k, 10; w, 37; m, 1= 48. cavalry, Maj.-Gen. James E. B. Stuart. Fitz Lee's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee: 1st Md. Battalion (serving with Ewell's corps), Maj. Harry Gilmor, Maj. Ridgely Brown; 1st Va., Col. James H. Drake; 2d Va., Col. T. T. Munford; 3d Va., Col. Thomas H. Owen; 4th Va., Col. Williams C. Wickham; 5th Va., Col. T. L. Rosser. Brigade loss: k, 5; w, 16; m, 29 = 50. Hampton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Wade Hampton (w), Col. Lawrence S. Baker: 1st N. C., Col. Lawrence S. Baker; 1st S. C.,----; 2d S. C.,----; Cobb's (Ga.) Legion,----; Jeff Davis Legion,