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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 174 6 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 142 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 129 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 87 3 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 73 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 59 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 51 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Daniel McCook or search for Daniel McCook in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Perryville, Ky., October 8th, 1862. (search)
ty-fifth Brigade, Lieut.-Col. Bernard Laiboldt: 44th Ill., Capt. Wallace W. Barrett; 73d Ill., Col. James F. Jaquess; 2d Mo., Capt. Walter Hoppe (k); 15th Mo., Maj. John Weber. Brigade loss: k, 22; w, 102; m, 1 = 125. Thirty-sixth Brigade, Col. Daniel McCook: 85th Ill., Col. Robert S. Moore; 86th Ill., Col. David D. Irons; 125th Ill., Col. Oscar F. Harmon; 52d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. D. D. T. Cowen. Brigade loss: k, 7; w, 63; m, 9 = 79. Thirty-seventh Brigade, Col. Nicholas Greusel: 36th Ill., Capt.t he estimated his corps at about 18,000 before the battle. About one-third of the whole were raw troops. Jackson's division was composed almost entirely of raw regiments.--editors. Perhaps not over one-half of these were actually engaged. General McCook, commanding the First Corps (which bore the brunt of the fight), says that Rousseau had present on the field 7000; Jackson, 5500; the brigade of Gooding [from Mitchell's division of Gilbert's corps] amounting to about 1500. The strength of C
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
19th of August I received information from General McCook, who was at Battle Creek with his own and th one division, but returned to McMinnville. McCook arrived there a little later and remained unti. Harris were at Battle Creek. The failure of McCook's movement up the Sequatchie was unfortunate. ur front. Orders were therefore dispatched to McCook, who was supposed to be about seven miles backenemy, and as soon as that was done Thomas and McCook were to report at headquarters for further ord instructions for attack could be given. When McCook reached his corps, it had materially changed iidan, who repelled it handsomely on his side. McCook fought bravely, and by Gilbert's order was rei Reenforcements were immediately ordered to McCook from Schoepf's division, which was in reserve,al Thomas, Second in Command: The First Corps (McCook's) on our left has been very heavily engaged. f battle were given on the evening of the 7th, McCook's exact position was not known. He was suppos[18 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 1.5 (search)
oached Perryville on the 7th of October, 1862, McCook's corps formed the left, Crittenden's the righn both sides. In the meantime the head of General McCook's corps, coming over the Mackville pike, awhen he arrived had retired from the field. McCook's corps, as previously related, had been orderGeneral McCook, and his march began at 5 A. M. McCook had with him then two divisions, Rousseau's ant waiting for the arrival of this brigade, General McCook, after giving his assistant adjutant-genermed. Not being apprehensive of an attack, General McCook then went back to his right. It was now nrill's brigade, and checked the attack. General McCook, perceiving that he was assailed by at leahim front and flank. About half an hour later McCook sent Captain H. N. Fisher, of his staff, to Ge Instead of sending Captain Fisher back to General McCook with my answer to his appeal for help, I afield, to the great relief of the right of General McCook's line. Just after Sheridan's artillery o[14 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 1.6 (search)
s position on the right. Fighting for water went on in our front, and it was understood that it extended all along the line, but no battle was expected that day. McCook was at Buell's headquarters in the morning, and received, I believe, some oral instructions regarding the contemplated attack. It was understood that care would Crittenden's corps, and the placing it in position on the right for the general engagement that was to be brought on as soon as the army was in line. We all saw McCook going serenely away like a general carrying his orders with him. In the afternoon we moved out for a position nearer Crittenden, as I inferred from the directiB. Fry, our chief of staff, called me up, and sent me with an order to General Gilbert, commanding the center corps, to send at once two brigades to reinforce General McCook, commanding the left corps. Thus I came to be a witness to some of the curious features of Perryville. I did not know what was going on at the left, and C
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
ft Cleburne's division of his corps and the reserve (McCown), and that, next morning, Hardee should take command in that quarter and begin the fight. At daylight on the 31st (Wednesday), Hardee, with Cleburne's and McCown's divisions, attacked McCook's corps of the Federal army. For a the Nashville pike out of Murfreesboro‘, looking North-West toward the rise of ground which was the site of fortress Rosecrans, constructed after the withdrawal of Bragg. From A photograph taken in 1884. View of Murfreesboro'from the vicinity of fortress Rosecrans. From a photograph taken in 1884. position, and resisted the attack with desperation. At this juncture Polk advanced with Withers's and Cheatham's divisions, and after hard fighting McCook's corps was driven back between three and four miles. Our attack had pivoted the Federals on their center, bending back their line, as one half-shuts a knife-blade. At 12 o'clock we had a large part of the field, with many prisoners, cannon, gun
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.89 (search)
his night march, General Thomas was told by Colonel Daniel McCook, commanding a brigade of the Reserve Corps, before, and which could easily be captured, as he (McCook) had burned the bridge behind the rebels. Thomas o the freshly arrived division of R. W. Johnson from McCook. Liddell extricated himself skillfully, losing heaivision (Thomas's corps), R. W. Johnson's division (McCook's), Palmer's division (Crittenden's), and Reynolds'as completed by Sheridan's and Davis's divisions of McCook's corps: Wood's and Van Cleve's divisions of Crittethe other way, striking the corps of Crittenden and McCook in flank, driving them with their commanders and ththose already mentioned. At 10:10 A. M. he ordered McCook to be ready at 10:30; Sheridan's division to support Thomas. General McCook says that he executed the order and marched the men at double-quick. This weakeni reverse the strong position of the enemy. Five of McCook's brigades were speedily driven off the field. He
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.91 (search)
They had reached the much-coveted Chattanooga road. McCook was at once notified that Thomas was heavily pressee, with two brigades, was also sent to aid Thomas. McCook was now left with one of Sheridan's brigades and twition; thus a wide gap was left in the Union line. McCook had already called up Wilder to strengthen his fronve. On they came like an angry flood. They struck McCook's three remaining brigades, the remnants of the Federal right. Under the daring personal exertions of McCook and Davis, they made a gallant but vain resistance.hen Longstreet struck the right, Rosecrans was near McCook and Crittenden. Seeing our line swept back, he hur, that the next stand must be made at Chattanooga. McCook and Crittenden, caught in the same tide of retreat,y remained in their original position — Johnson, of McCook's corps; Palmer, of Crittenden's, and Baird and Reyastened down toward Crawfish Springs, instructed by McCook to order the cavalry to the left to fill the gaps m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Reenforcing Thomas at Chickamauga. (search)
ing his whole army on Thomas? I am going to his assistance. We quickly climbed down the rick, and, going to Steedman, Granger ordered him to move his command over there, pointing toward the place from which came the sounds of battle. Colonel Daniel McCook was directed to hold fast at McAfee Church, where his brigade covered the Ringgold road. Before half-past 11 o'clock Steedman's command was in motion. Granger, with his staff and escort, rode in advance. Steedman, after accompanying thd round Thomas's left, and was then partly in his rear. Granger halted to feel them. Soon becoming convinced that it was only a large party of observation, he again started his column and pushed rapidly forward. I was then sent to bring up Colonel McCook's brigade, and put it in position to watch the movements of the enemy, to keep open the Lafayette road, and to cover the open fields between that point and the position held by Thomas. This brigade remained there the rest of the day. Our ski
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Notes on the Chickamauga campaign. (search)
ntion to the other two. Thomas was directed to the 26 and McCook to the42 mile pass, while Crittenden made demonstrations nnts which had placed Thomas near to and west of Lafayette, McCook sixteen miles farther south, and was now placing Crittenden farther north than McCook was south of the Confederate army, made it convenient for Bragg to overwhelm in succession our sden was now ordered to the mills, Thomas to Lafayette, and McCook to Summerville, twenty-five miles south of Lafayette; for corps, took no decisive advantage of our helplessness. McCook found that the enemy's cavalry, when driven, always retrear miles away. Thomas commanded six divisions at the left, McCook two at the right, and Crittenden the two in reserve. Thom up on Reynolds and support him as soon as possible, while McCook was to move Davis by the left flank into the position vaca proved that Thomas was still holding the enemy in check. McCook and Crittenden soon joined Rosecrans at Chattanooga; but T
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Chickamauga, Ga. September 19th-20th; 1863. (search)
Lilly; 19th Ind. (Second Brigade), Capt. Samuel J. Harris (w), Lieut. Robert G. Lackey; 21st Ind. (Third Brigade), Capt. William W. Andrew. Artillery loss included in brigades to which attached. Twentieth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Alexander McD. McCook. Provost-Guard: H, 81st Ind., Capt. William J. Richards. Escort: I, 2d Ky. Cav., Lieut. George W. L. Batman. First division, Brig.-Gen. Jefferson C. Davis. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William P. Carlin: 21st Ill., Col. John W. S. Alexanduhart (w), Capt. Armstrong J. Thomas; 113th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Darius B. Warner; 121st Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Henry B. Banning; M, 1st Ill. Art'y, Lieut. Thos. Burton. Brigade loss: k, 58; w, 308; m, 95==461. Second division. Second Brigade, Col. Daniel McCook: 85th Ill., Col. Caleb J. Dilworth; 86th Ill., Lieut.-Col. D. W. Magee; 125th Ill., Col. Oscar F. Harmon; 52d Ohio, Maj. J. T. Holmes; 69th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. J. H. Brigham; I, 2d Ill. Art'y, Capt. C. M. Barnett. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 14;
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