hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 278 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 202 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 140 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 115 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 102 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 79 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 70 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 1 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 53 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Lafayette McLaws or search for Lafayette McLaws in all documents.

Your search returned 91 results in 26 document sections:

1 2 3
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
as follows: On Taylor's Hill next the river and forming my left, R. H. Anderson's division; on Marye's Hill, Ransom's and McLaws's divisions; on Telegraph Hill, Pickett's division; to the right and about Deep Run Creek, Hood's division, the latter stemy, to reach him, would have to put himself in a pocket and be subjected to attack from Jackson on one side, Pickett and McLaws on the other, and Hood's own men in front. The position of Franklin's men on the 12th, with the configuration of the gro-five hundred men, being all of General T. R. R. Cobb's brigade, and a portion of the brigade of General Kershaw, both of McLaws's division. It must now be understood that the Federals, to reach what appeared to be my weakest point, would have to pasome few scattering ones, but they were either killed or they fled from certain death. In his official report General Lafayette McLaws says: The body of one man, believed to be an officer, was found within about thirty yards of the stone-wall, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The confederate left at Fredericksburg. (search)
The confederate left at Fredericksburg. by Lafayette McLAWS, Major-General, C. S. A. On the 25th of November, 1862, my division marched into Fredericksburg, and shortly after, by direction of General Longstreet, I occupied the city with one of my brigades and picketed the river with strong detachments from the dam at Falmouth to a quarter of a mile below Deep Run creek, the enemy's pickets being just across the river, within a stone's-throw of mine. Detachments were immediately set at work digging rifle-pits close to the edge of the bank, so close that our men, when in them, could command the river and the shores on each side. The cellars of the houses near the river were made available for the use of riflemen, and zigzags were constructed to enable the men to get in and out of the rifle-pits under cover. All this was done at night, and so secretly and quietly that I do not believe the enemy had any conception of the minute and careful preparations that had been made to defeat
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Ransom's division at Fredericksburg. (search)
icksburg, December 13th, 1862, writes as follows: . . . Longstreet's corps constituted our left, with Anderson's division resting upon the river, and those of McLaws, Pickett, and Hood extending to the right in the order named. Ransom's division supported the batteries on Marye's and Willis's hills, at the foot of which Cobb's brigade of McLaws's division and the 24th North Carolina of Ransom's brigade were stationed, protected by a stone-wall. The immediate care of this point was committed to General Ransom. The italics in this paper are all mine. The positions are stated by General Lee exactly as the troops were posted. Lee's report continuesgain, I would also mention, as particularly distinguished in the engagement of the 13th, Brigadier-Generals Ransom, Kershaw, and Cooke (severely wounded). General McLaws was not upon the part of the field in the vicinity of Marye's and Willis's hills during the battle, but his aide, Captain King, was killed on the front slope
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Kershaw's brigade at Fredericksburg. (search)
egiments to reenforce Cobb, and did so. Before they had reached him, tidings arrived of the fall of General Cobb, and I was immediately ordered to take the rest of my brigade to the position held by his forces, and assume command of the troops of McLaws's division there. I preceded my troops, and as soon as possible arrived at the Stevens House at the foot of Marye's Hill. As my brigade arrived they were placed--two regiments, the 3d and the 7th South Carolina, at Marye's House on the hill, anpoint, as General Ransom supposes, I had five regiments and a battalion (my entire brigade), each of which suffered more or less severely. During these operations I received no orders or directions from any officer but my division commander, General McLaws. I requested not to be relieved that night, and remained in that position until the evacuation of Fredericksburg by the Union forces. These facts were officially reported at the time, and were then too well known to be the subject of mistak
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Fredericksburg, Va. (search)
duty equipped, or available for line of battle, was 104,903 infantry, 5884 cavalry, and 5896 artillery == 116,683. The Confederate army. Army of Northern Virginia.--General Robert E. Lee. First Army Corps, Lieut.-Gen. James Longstreet. McLaws's division, Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws. Staff loss: k, 1; w, 1 == 2. Kershaw's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw: 2d S. C., Col. John D. Kennedy; 3d S. C., Col. James D. Nance (w), Lieut.-Col. William D. Rutherford (w), Maj. Robert C. MafMaj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws. Staff loss: k, 1; w, 1 == 2. Kershaw's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw: 2d S. C., Col. John D. Kennedy; 3d S. C., Col. James D. Nance (w), Lieut.-Col. William D. Rutherford (w), Maj. Robert C. Maffett (w), Capt. William W. Hance (w), Capt. John C. Summer (k), Capt. John K. G. Nance; 7th S. C., Lieut.-Col. Elbert Bland; 8th S. C., Capt. E. T. Stackhouse; 15th S. C., Col. W. D. De Saussure; 3d S. C. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. W. G. Rice. Brigade loss: k, 38; w, 341 == 379. Barksdale's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Barksdale: 13th Miss., Col. J. W. Carter; 17th Miss., Lieut.-Col. John C. Fiser; 18th Miss., Lieut.-Col. William H. Luse; 21st Miss., Col. Benjamin G. Humphreys. Brigade loss: k, 29;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The successes and failures of Chancellorsville. (search)
d. The next day, the 30th of April, I moved on toward Chancellorsville, and at 1 o'clock in the day I captured a courier or orderly from General Lee, who had a dispatch from Lee, dated at Fredericksburg, noon of that day, and addressed to Major-General McLaws, stating that he had just been informed that the enemy had concentrated in force near Chancellorsville, inquiring why he had not been kept advised, and saying that he wished to see McLaws as soon as possible at headquarters. At 2 o'clock McLaws as soon as possible at headquarters. At 2 o'clock P. M., one hour later, I reported to General Hooker at Chancellorsville, and submitted to him the diary and General Lee's dispatch, both of which he retained, and I suggested that we had evidently surprised General Lee by our rapid movements across the river, and, as Lee had prepared for a battle at Chancellorsville, we had better anticipate him by moving on toward Fredericksburg. A march of three or four miles would take us out of the woods into a more open country, where we could form our lin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Eleventh Corps at Chancellorsville. (search)
um. Our lines covered between five and six miles of frontage, and Hooker was near the middle point. The main body of our cavalry, under Stoneman, had gone off on a raid upon Lee's communications, and the remainder of the Army of the Potomac was under the sturdy Sedgwick, beyond Fredericksburg. Our opponents, under General Robert E. Lee, the evening before, were about two miles distant toward Fredericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLaws, Anderson, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, besides some cavalry under Stuart. He The old Chancellor house, burned during the battle. From a photograph. held, for his line of battle, a comparatively short front between the Rappahannock and the Catherine Furnace, not exceeding two miles and a half in extent. His right wing, not far from the river, was behind Mott's Run, which flows due east, and his left was deployed along the Catherine Furnace road. Could Hooker, on the first day of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Stonewall Jackson's last battle. (search)
s about 60,000 men. General Longstreet, with part of his corps, was absent below Petersburg. General Lee had two divisions of Longstreet's corps, Anderson's, and McLaws's, and Jackson's corps, consisting of four divisions, A. P. Hill's, D. H. Hill's, commanded by Rodes, Trimble's, commanded by Colston, and Early's; Lee and Jackson in council on the night of May 1. and about 170 pieces of field-artillery. The divisions of Anderson and McLaws had been sent from Fredericksburg to meet Hooker's advance from Chancellorsville; Anderson on Wednesday, and McLaws (except Barksdale's brigade, left with Early) on Thursday. At the Tabernacle Church, about four McLaws (except Barksdale's brigade, left with Early) on Thursday. At the Tabernacle Church, about four miles east of Chancellorsville, the opposing forces met and brisk skirmishing began. On Friday, Jackson, reaching Anderson's position, took command of the Confederate advance, and urged on his skirmish line under Brigadier-General Ramseur with great vigor. How the muskets rattled along a front of a mile or two, across the unfen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Lee's knowledge of Hooker's movements. (search)
y's operations there, the day and night previous, that his present purpose is to draw our troops in that direction while he attempts a passage elsewhere. I would not, then, send down more troops than are actually necessary. I will notify Gen'ls McLaws and Anderson to be on the alert, for I think that if a real attempt is made to cross the river it will be above Fredericksburg. Very respectfully, R. E. Lee, General The letter was indorsed by Jackson, Respectfully referred to General Cols were almost the exact words of General Lee, to which he added, Move at once, which I did. I was not a little puzzled at the time (not knowing the situation at Fredericksburg), and I wondered why we were not to continue our advance and hurl Hooker into the river. Lee left the field at Chancellorsville immediately after giving me the above orders, and hastened to Early's support with McLaws's division, Mahone's brigade, and other troops, and compelled Sedgwick to retreat across the Rappahannock.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate army. (search)
The Confederate army. army of Northern Virginia.--General Robert E. Lee. First Army Corps. Lieut.-Gen. James Longstreet, with Hood's and Pickett's divisions and Dearing's and Henry's artillery battalions, absent in South-eastern Virginia. McLaws's division, Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws. Wofford's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. Wofford: 16th Ga.,----; The dash indicates that the name of the commanding officer has not been found in the Official Records.--editors. 18th Ga.,----; 24th Ga.,---Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws. Wofford's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. Wofford: 16th Ga.,----; The dash indicates that the name of the commanding officer has not been found in the Official Records.--editors. 18th Ga.,----; 24th Ga.,----; Cobb's (Ga.) Legion,----; Phillips's (Ga.) Legion,----. Brigade loss: k, 74; w, 479; m, 9 = 562. Semmes's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Paul J. Semmes: 10th Ga., Lieut.-Col. W. C. Holt; 50th Ga., Lieut.-Col. F. Kearse; 51st Ga., Col. W. M. Slaughter (k), Lieut.-Col. Edward Ball (w); 53d Ga., Col. James P. Simms. Brigade loss: k, 85; w, 492; m, 26 =603. Kershaw's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw: 2d S. C., Col. John D. Kennedy; 3d S. C., Maj. R. C. Maffett; 7th S. C., Col. Elbert Bland; 8th S. C.,
1 2 3