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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
the belief that Bragg's objective point was Nashville, and that he would take the short route overle and Decatur Railroad, marched directly to Nashville. The strength of Buell's forces during the Richmond, and without halting he marched to Nashville. On September 7th he intrusted General Thom, but Buell had the advantage of a bridge at Nashville and the assistance of the railroad to aid inrailroad at points between Bowling Green and Nashville, and otherwise sought to retard the northernent to Buell that no attack would be made on Nashville, and he ordered General Thomas to join him wes did not include the 12,397 troops left at Nashville, which would make the entire force subject t to the enemy, less than ten miles south of Nashville. The campaign was over. Buell was deprivend that Bragg should have followed Buell to Nashville do not consider that he would have found himid march, he could have reached and captured Nashville and returned and established himself at Bowl[1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Morgan's cavalry during the Bragg invasion. (search)
nst the Federal garrisons in the vicinity of Nashville, and the detachments employed immediately noon of the railroad track and bridges between Nashville and Bowling Green, for the purpose of retardwork before him in Tennessee and in front of Nashville, whither Buell, having turned aside from purthe transportation of troops and supplies to Nashville. While engaged in this work he received ordn the bank of the Cumberland River, opposite Nashville. It was planned that Forrest should make such a demonstration south of Nashville that the attention of the garrison would be attracted, while Morgan should dash into Edgefield and burn the cars, several hundred in number. Leaving Gallatinhe night of November the 4th, Morgan entered Edgefield at daybreak the next morning, and immediatel moment on the other side of the river. But Nashville was so strongly fortified on that side, and rching upon three or four roads leading into Nashville, and we were immediately in its path. Critt[1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
he railroad seriously, and produced alarm in Nashville, where the force was not large. The follo place, and destroyed several bridges toward Nashville. Our communication with Louisville, on whic appearance again on the Cumberland north of Nashville, General R. W. Johnson, a spirited cavalry oisions. Our railroad communication north of Nashville had been broken for twenty days, and no effoions of the necessity of opening the road to Nashville were answered with orders from Washington to was plainly necessary to concentrate nearer Nashville, where we could get to work on the railroad,t no considerable force remained to threaten Nashville, I called up Thomas's division, and now detencentration of my army from Murfreesboro' to Nashville, and would perhaps have caused the transfer in the Valley of the Cumberland endangering Nashville. In Kentucky and other bordering States, ther than the recovery of middle Tennessee and Nashville; and if, under the circumstances, a proposit[15 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
out of Kentucky in a few weeks, and recovered permanently the large and to us important territory. After General Bragg was compelled to leave Kentucky, the Federal army, which until then had been commanded by General Buell, was established at Nashville, under General Rosecrans. And General Bragg, by a very circuitous route through south-eastern Kentucky and north-eastern Tennessee, brought his troops to the neighborhood of Murfreesboro‘. Mr. Davis says [ Rise and fall, p. 384] that the stren while of no present value to that department, was disastrous to that of Tennessee, for it caused the battle of Murfreesboro‘. General Rosecrans was, of course, soon informed of the great reduction of his antagonist's strength, and marched from Nashville to attack him. The battle, that of Murfreesboro' or Stone's River, occurred on the 31st of December, 1862, and the 2d of January, 1863, and was one of the most obstinately contested and bloody of the war, in proportion to the numbers engaged.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
an immediate offensive movement against Buell. The importance of recovering Nashville induced the proposed change of operation. But, upon further consideration, h ordered by Bragg to operate on Rosecrans's lines of communication in rear of Nashville, and to prevent him from foraging north of the Cumberland. Learning that thes of Cheatham's division, with Wheeler's cavalry, made a demonstration before Nashville, he set out on the 6th from Baird's Mills, with four regiments and one battaldquarters to learn the situation and his plans. Rosecrans was advancing from Nashville with his whole army. Wheeler with his cavalry was so disposed at the moment ur right wing, with its right resting on the Lebanon Pike and its left on the Nashville road. Polk's corps, composed of Withers's and Cheatham's divisions, was to take post with its right touching Hardee on the Nashville road, and its left resting on the Salem Pike; McCown's division was to form the reserve and to occupy our ce
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The battle of Stone's River. (search)
6th of December, 1862, General W. S. Rosecrans, who on the 20th of October had succeeded General Buell in the command of the Army of the Cumberland, set out from Nashville with that army with the purpose of attacking the Confederate forces under General Braxton Bragg, then concentrated in the neighborhood of Murfreesboro‘, on Stonees. A train there, and another at Nolens-ville, shared the fate of that at La Vergne, and three hundred paroled prisoners were left to carry the tidings back to Nashville. At 2 o'clock on the morning of the 31st Wheeler came up bright and smiling upon the left flank of the Confederate army in front of Murfreesboro‘, having made tly expected to find the Union troops gone from his front on the morning of the 2d. His cavalry had reported the turnpike full of troops and wagons moving toward Nashville, but the force east of Stone's River soon attracted his attention. Reconnoissance by staff-officers revealed Beatty's line, enfilading Polk in his new position.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Union left at Stone's River. (search)
the men said: General, I will get you a first-rate beefsteak. Next morning I found that the steak had been cut from a horse that had been killed. I didn't know this at the time I ate it. On the night of the 31st a wagon-train arrived from Nashville escorted by a thousand men, and these men, I learned, were sent back. I won't say whom they were under, but I know I felt and thought it was unwise that a thousand men who hadn't been in the fight at all should be sent away. All the wagons ino‘, and we drove them out. They went off a few miles and camped again. And we, although we were the victors, virtually went into hospital for six months before we could march after them again. Whether we would take Murfreesboro' or go back to Nashville was doubtful until the last moment. As in most of our battles, very meager fruits resulted to either side from such partial victories as were for the most part won. Yet it was a triumph. It showed that in the long run the big purse and the bi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Manoeuvring Bragg out of Tennessee. (search)
as controlling Confederate railroad communication between the East and West, had rendered it the objective point of all the campaigns of the armies of the Ohio and the Cumberland. As the contending armies stood facing each other on the 20th of June, 1863, General Bragg estimated the effective strength of his army at 30,449 infantry, 13,962 cavalry, and 2254 artillery. Polk and Hardee commanded his two corps of infantry, and Wheeler and Forrest the cavalry. Deducting the garrisons of Nashville and points Map of the Tullahoma campaign. north, and the Reserve Corps, 12,575, to be used in emergency, Rosecrans had at the same date present for duty, equipped, 40,746 infantry, 6806 cavalry, and 3065 artillery, for an offensive campaign. Having received full and accurate descriptions of the fortifications at Tullahoma, where a part of Polk's corps was intrenched behind formidable breastworks, protected by an abatis of fallen trees six hundred yards in width, and at Shelbyville, wh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.89 (search)
e morning after the battle he found the ever-vigilant General Liddell feeling his way to find the enemy. Inasmuch as every one in his army was supposed to know on the night of the battle that we had won a complete victory, it seemed to me quite ludicrous that an officer should be commended for his vigilance the next morning in looking for the enemy in his immediate presence. I know that I was then laying a plan by which we might overhaul the enemy at Chattanooga or between that point and Nashville. It did not occur to me on the night of the 20th to send Bragg word of our complete success. I thought that the loud huzzas that spread over the field lust at dark were a sufficient assurance and notice to any one within five miles of us. . . . Rosecrans speaks particularly of his apprehension that I would move down the Dry Valley road. D. H. H. Some of the severest fighting had yet to be done after 3 P. M. It probably never happened before for a great battle to be fought to its blo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Notes on the Chickamauga campaign. (search)
lliant and faultless. He had not achieved the highest success — the destruction of his adversary, but he had forced from the enemy strategic advantages from which immense results were afterward gained by his successors. But the moment he entered Chattanooga he should have concentrated his army there long enough to accumulate supplies, ascertain the position and intentions of his adversary, and whether or not Burnside would reenforce him. He was now 337 miles from the Ohio River, 150 from Nashville, and his prudence, not his impetuosity, should have increased. Halleck, himself deceived, misled Rosecrans, who judged that his present work was to pursue an alarmed adversary, and, accordingly, on the 10th of September, ordered Crittenden's corps to seek the enemy in the direction of Ringgold,--thus still farther separating his army. General Wood's division, to which I belonged, happened to be the rear of Crittenden's column, and in the evening a simple negro informed Wood of the posi
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