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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
d in what is called the Kentucky Campaign of 1862. Major-General E. Kirby Smith had reached Knoxville March 8th, 1862, and assumed command of the Confederate troops in east Tennessee. The returnsAugust 5th Bragg sent two of his brigades (Cleburne's and Preston Smith's) to General Smith at Knoxville. General C. L. Stevenson, with nearly nine thousand men, was ordered to watch the Federal Genfirmly till to-morrow. Yours, etc., Braxton Bragg. Bragg had now determined to retreat to Knoxville by the way of Cumberland Gap. It was evident that Buell's large army would enable him to sele and again in August by sending the brigades of Cleburne and Preston Smith from Chattanooga to Knoxville; Spring near Perryville, which helped to relieve Bragg's parched army. From a photograph t with the fairest prospect of cutting off General Buell. On the 12th Bragg wrote to Smith, at Knoxville, as follows: On Friday I shall probably commence crossing the river [Tennessee], by which I sh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Cumberland Gap. (search)
t I wanted. On the evening of the 17th of June, General Carter L. Stevenson of the Confederate forces sent Colonel J. E. Rains to cover the evacuation of Cumberland Gap, The Confederate forces covering the mountain and river passes north of Knoxville at this time were under General C. L. Stevenson, First Division, Department of East Tennessee.--editors. which had been commenced on the afternoon of that day; Rains withdrew in the night and marched toward Morristown. Unaware of that fact, atorps of Engineers, a soldier of distinguished merit and ability, was sent by Secretary Stanton to strengthen the fortifications at the Gap, and he soon rendered them impregnable against attack. My hope and ambition now was to advance against Knoxville and arouse the Union men of east Tennessee to arms. I urgently asked for two additional brigades of infantry, a battery, and two regiments of cavalry, and, thus reenforced, pledged myself to sweep east Tennessee of the Confederates. My guns w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
nty-six times. His vigilance was so well known by the infantry that they never feared a surprise. Hard marching, stony roads, and deep fords lay before us until we had crossed Cumberland Gap. But at last almost all that had been taken out of Kentucky was safely conveyed to Morristown, Tenn. About the 31st of October, 1862, General Bragg, having made a short visit to Richmond, there obtained the sanction of the Confederate Government for a movement into middle Tennessee. Returning to Knoxville, General Bragg made preparations with the utmost rapidity for the advance to Murfreesboro‘, where General Breckinridge was already posted, and General Forrest was operating with a strong, active cavalry force. Our headquarters were advanced to Tullahoma on the 14th of November, and on the 26th to Murfreesboro‘. Notwithstanding long marches and fighting, the condition of the troops was very good; and had they been well clad, the Confederate army would have presented a fine appearance. O
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Morgan's Ohio raid. (search)
Morgan's Ohio raid. In the summer of 1863, the Confederate army at Tullahoma having been weakened by detachments for the defense of Vicksburg, Bragg found himself exposed to the risk of an attack by Rosecrans from Murfreesboro' simultaneously with a movement by Burnside from the Ohio to drive Buckner out of Knoxville. Bragg therefore determined to fall back to Chattanooga. To cover the retreat he ordered Brigadier-General John H. Morgan with a picked force from his division of mounted infantry Brig.-Gen. B. W. Duke commanded the First Brigade, and Colonel Adam R. Johnson the Second.--editors. to ride into Kentucky, breaking up the railroad, attacking Rosecrans's detachments, and threatening Louisville. To gain more time, Morgan wanted to extend the raid by a wide sweep beyond the Ohio, but Bragg would not consent. Morgan set out from Burkesville, on the 2d of July, with 2460 men and 4 guns, ostensibly to execute Bragg's orders, but really bent on carrying out his own pla
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.89 (search)
ot. But he probably contemplated throwing a column across the Tennessee to the north of the town to cut off Buckner at Knoxville from a junction with Bragg, and inclose him between that column and the forces of Burnside which were pressing toward KKnoxville.--D. H. H. Buckner's division was promptly withdrawn south of the Hiawassee.--editors. On Fast Day, Map of the Chickamauga campaign. August 21st, while religious services were being held in town, the enemy appeared on the oppositver, the town was the objective point of the campaign, and to lose it was virtually to lose all east Tennessee south of Knoxville. If Bragg knew at the time of the prospective help coming to him from the Army of Northern Virginia, it was of still my corps, Breckinridge's division of my corps had come up from Mississippi and was substituted for Stewart's, sent to Knoxville to join Buckner. D. H. H. consisting of Breckinridge's and Cleburne's divisions, had led in the withdrawal, and was ha
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Notes on the Chickamauga campaign. (search)
f retreat. Time had now become of pressing importance to him, because heavy reenforcements were advancing to his aid: two divisions from Mississippi, one from Knoxville, and a renowned corps under Longstreet from the army of General Lee. He was in a few days to feel the mistake of allowing us so easily to come to the last barri between immediate retreat and ultimate surrender. He retreated; and on the 9th of September Crittenden entered Chattanooga. These operations drew Buckner from Knoxville to the aid of Bragg, and Burnside marched into Knoxville. It is surprising that the events of the last sixty days did not suggest to General Halleck concentraKnoxville. It is surprising that the events of the last sixty days did not suggest to General Halleck concentrations that must have ended the war in 1863. By the 4th of July Meade had seriously defeated and permanently weakened Lee at Gettysburg, and Grant, by giving us Vicksburg and 30,000 prisoners, had ended all important operations near the Mississippi River. In the main, this left Grant's army of 75,000 men free to be sent in whateve
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 9.97 (search)
e I telegraphed to Burnside, who was then at Knoxville, General Burnside assumed command of the e detachment of Longstreet for the attack on Knoxville was not, in his opinion, a great mistake on efore Longstreet could possibly have reached Knoxville, I ordered Gen. Thomas peremptorily to attacning the territory he held south and west of Knoxville, so as to draw the enemy farther from his baupying a position farther up the valley than Knoxville,--about Maynardsville,--and was still in tel to the mouth of the Holston, and up that to Knoxville, accompanied by the boat. In addition to thetreat, the relief of Burnside's position at Knoxville was a matter for immediate consideration. S corps of the Army of the Cumberland, toward Knoxville; but his approach caused Longstreet to abandore these troops reached their destination. Knoxville was now relieved; the anxiety of the Presideced over the double victory: the raising of the siege of Knoxville and the victory at Chattanooga. [8 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Opposing forces in the Chattanooga campaign. November 23d-27th, 1863. (search)
. J. E. Austin; 4th La. Battalion, Maj. S. L. Bishop. Brigade loss: k, 28; w, 96; m, 233==357. Artillery Battalion, Eufaula Battery (Oliver's), Lieut. William J. McKenzie; La. Battery, Capt. Charles E. Fenner; Miss. Battery, Capt. T. J. Stanford. Battalion loss: k, 1; w, 6; m, 5==12. Escort company, loss: w, 1; m, 1==2. Reserve artillery. Robertson's Battalion, Capt. Felix H. Robertson: Ala. Battery (Lumsden's), Lieut. H. H. Cribbs; Ga. Battery (Havis's), Lieut. J. R. Duncan; Ga. Battery, Capt. R. W. Anderson; Mo. Battery, Capt. Oberton W. Barret. Battalion loss: k, 1; w, 4; m, 6==11. Williams's Battalion, Maj. S. C. Williams: Ala. Battery, Capt. R. Kolb; Jeffress's Battery, Capt. W. C. Jeffress; Miss. Battery (Darden's), Lieut. H. W. Bullen. Battalion loss: w, 2. cavalry: Parts of the 3d, 8th, and 10th Confederate, and 1st, 2d, 4th, and 5th Tenn. Total Confederate loss: killed, 361; wounded, 2180; captured or missing, 4146==6687. Confederate assault on Fort Sanders.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Knoxville. (search)
The defense of Knoxville. by Orlando M. Poe, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. A. It was determiry dash. During the enemy's occupation of Knoxville, a very small beginning had been made towardks were submitted,--one, afterward known as Fort Sanders, on the site of the imperfect work first mehe enemy to enable us to get our trains into Knoxville, and to forward the defensive works at that he topographical features of the vicinity of Knoxville give that place decided strength as a milita Map of the approaches and Defences of Knoxville, Tenn., showing the positions occupied by the Unssed the ridge about a mile north-west from Fort Sanders. For the remainder of the 17th these comt Loudon, on the site afterward occupied by Fort Sanders. A second growth of pines, averaging aboutHoxie, in charge of the railroad property at Knoxville, informed me that he had a lot of old telegrrangements. The North-Western bastion of Fort Sanders, viewed from the South-Western bastion. Fr[53 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Longstreet at Knoxville. (search)
on's) were sent from Chattanooga and reached Knoxville by the 28th, but were not actively engaged.-he third day, the 17th, Burnside was safe in Knoxville, and we encamped at Hazen's, a short distancfinished by the Federals and by them called Fort Sanders. It was upon a hill that fell off to the nengineer to Bragg, who had been stationed at Knoxville and was familiar with its fortifications. Uecided to go back to the plan of assaulting Fort Sanders, and I was ordered to get the guns back upodeep, and ordinarily a ditch Fort Stanley, Knoxville. From a photograph. of that depth would noehind the line of the Vertical section of Fort Sanders. enemy's rifle-pits, which our sharp-shoott was finally decided to remain and threaten Knoxville as long as possible, and draw Sherman off fry off for horse-shoes that on the advance to Knoxville we stripped the shoes from all the dead horseleven months of daily fighting, at Appomattox. Knoxville in 1870. from a water-color Sketoh. [9 more...]
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