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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 196 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 62 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 48 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 48 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 26 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Round Top or search for Round Top in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.39 (search)
ware of that, General, but I have written orders in my pocket from General Meade, which I will show you if you wish to see them. General Howard said: No; I do not doubt your word, General Hancock, but you can give no orders here while I am here. Hancock replied: Very well, General Howard, I will second any order that you have to give, but General Meade has also directed me to select a field on which to fight this battle in rear of Pipe Creek. Then, casting one glance from Culp's Hill to Round Top, he continued: But I think this the strongest position by nature upon which to fight a battle that I ever saw, and if it meets your approbation I will select this as the battle-field. General Howard responded: I think it a very strong position, General Hancock; a very strong position! Very well, sir, I select this as the battle-field. General Hancock immediately turned away to rectify our lines. There was no person present besides myself when the conversation took place between Howar
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.42 (search)
Cemetery Ridge. 18. Little Round Top. 19. Round Top. 20. Devil's Den. 21. Wheat-field. 22. Tr and woods, lying athwart the direct line to Round Top, and forcing a bend to the east in the Taneypecially destructive to Hazlett's battery on Round Top, as the cannoneers had to expose themselves e his artillery there. I had been as far as Round Top that morning, and had noticed the unfavorablen our line — which in any case must rest on Round Top, and connect with the left of the Second Corissance but return to headquarters by way of Round Top, and examine that part of the proposed line.ses the run abuts rather on Devil's Den than Round Top; it was commanded by the much higher Peach Oiven into the valley between Devil's Den and Round Top, from which they could not escape. A shell Devil's Den), and noticing the importance of Round Top, he suggested to Longstreet that the Trost clung to the woods and rocks at the base of Round Top, carried Devil's Den and its woods, and capt[6 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.44 (search)
the 44th, 48th, and 4th Alabama from Law's brigade about the time they arrived at the foot of Round Top in their advance and connected them with Robertson's line, then well in front of Little Round bama to carry out the flanking movement alone, which they did, passing up the southern side of Round Top, and halting some ten minutes on the crest for rest. This halt proved fatal to the success ofal Sykes to occupy the position to the left, or southward, of Little Round Top, between it and Round Top, about the same time that Colonel O'Rorke with the 140th New York and Hazlett's battery, the a-editors. Resuming their march, these two regiments passed down the north-easterly side of Round Top and advanced across the wooded depression between the hills to charge up the rear of Little Rowith over three hundred prisoners and all the wounded. The 20th Maine returned with its prisoners to the original position, and staid there until ordered forward in the early evening to Round Top.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.47 (search)
The struggle for Round Top. by E. M. Law, Major-General, C. S. A. More has been written concextreme right wing, extending to the foot of Round Top, little or nothing has been written on the Cbeen the fortune of any troops to confront. Round Top rose like a huge sentinel guarding the Federes of the attack. How far up the slope of Round Top the Federal left extended we could not tell,es moving across the fields from the rear of Round Top in the direction of the Emmitsburg road. Thfrom my scouts, who had reached the crest of Round Top. He reported that there was no Federal forcee hills known as Devil's Den, to our left of Round Top, and separated from the latter by Plum Run v right, had swept over the northern slope of Round Top, cleared it of the enemy, and then, making ahe importance of holding so vital a point as Round Top and its adjacent spurs, commenced sending rend took refuge in the woods near the base of Round Top. When the last turn to the left was made, ab[11 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Kershaw's brigade at Gettysburg. (search)
undred yards from Rose's. Beyond the morass was a stony hill, covered with heavy timber and thick undergrowth, interspersed with bowlders and large fragments of rock, extending some distance toward the Federal main line, and in the direction of Round Top, and to our left and in rear of the orchard and the batteries posted there. Beyond the stone wall last mentioned, and to the right of the stony hill, was a dense forest extending far to the right. From the morass a small stream ran into this of time on the part of McLaws's division, from the day it left Culpeper to that of its arrival at Gettysburg. If any ensued after that, it was due to circumstances wholly unknown to the writer. Certainly, the loss of time, if any, would not have lost the fight, if there had been perfect cooperation of all the troops. But, except to vindicate the truth, it is vain to inquire into the causes of our failure. The last Confederate gun at Gettysburg-on Longstreet's right, opposite Round Top.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Lee's right wing at Gettysburg. (search)
of us was in plain view of the Federal signal station on Round Top. To avoid that point the direction of the troops was chan impact. They retired, many of them, in the direction of Round Top behind bowlders and fences, which gave them shelter, and ge, while the Federals occupied the range stretching from Round Top to Cemetery Hill and around Culp's Hill. The position ofns. In the meantime the Federals had placed batteries on Round Top, in position to make a raking fire against troops attackie way the Federal batteries would have a raking fire from Round Top, while the sharp-shooters, artillery, and infantry would eived a fearful fire from the batteries in front and from Round Top. The troops marched steadily, taking the fire with great ghter was terrible, the enfilade fire of the batteries on Round Top being very destructive. At times one shell would knock dg made at sunrise; then troops had been concentrated, and Round Top, the commanding position unoccupied in the morning, had r
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A reply to General Longstreet. (search)
2 P. M. Had Longstreet attacked not later than 9 or 10 A. M., as Lee certainly expected, Sickles's and Hancock's corps would have been defeated before part of the Fifth and the Sixth corps arrived. Little Round Top (which, as it was, the Fifth Corps barely managed to seize in time) would have fallen into Confederate possession; and even if nothing more had been done this would have given the field to the Confederates, since the Federal line all the way to Cemetery Hill was untenable with Round Top in hostile hands. Fifth. That Longstreet's attack when made was poorly seconded by the other corps may be true, and thus another chance of winning a complete victory on July 2d was lost, but this does not change the fact that the first and great opportunity of that day for the Confederates was lost by Longstreet's delay. Sixth. Victory on the third day was for the Confederates a far more difficult problem than on the second, but it was still within their reach. But one need not be s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The great charge and artillery fighting at Gettysburg. (search)
the artillery, to keep it out of sight of the signal-station upon Round Top. This suggests the remark that I have never understood why thents out of their sight., That wretched little signal-station upon Round Top that day caused one of our divisions to lose over two hours, and nearly that long. During that time a Federal corps arrived near Round Top and became an important factor in the action which followed.--E. infantry had been marched on a road that brought them in sight of Round Top, and instead of taking to the fields and hollows, they had been h what seemed a strong position extending along the ridge north of Round Top. Hood's troops under Law gained the slope of Little Round Top, buguns were to open on Cemetery Hill and the ridge extending toward Round Top, which was covered with batteries. I was to observe the fire andposition seemed to have broken out with guns everywhere, and from Round Top to Cemetery Hill was blazing like a volcano. The air seemed full
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.53 (search)
s, leaden bullets proving as fatal to them as to the soldiers whose bodies were thickly strewn beneath them. Longstreet's arrangements had been made to attack Round Top, and his orders issued with a view to turning it, when General Lee decided that the assault should be made on Cemetery Ridge by Pickett's and Pettigrew's divisio's was replaced by Cowan's. Meantime the enemy advanced, and McGilvery opened a destructive oblique fire, reenforced by that of Rittenhouse's six rifle-guns from Round Top, which were served with remarkable accuracy, enfilading Pickett's lines. The Confederate approach was magnificent, and excited our admiration; but the story of dition to advance a sufficient force for a counterassault. The largest bodies of organized troops available were on the left, and General Meade now proceeded to Round Top and pushed out skirmishers to feel the enemy in its front. An advance to the Plum Run line, of the troops behind it, would have brought them directly in front o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Repelling Lee's last blow at Gettysburg. (search)
e, lay along the remnants of a stone wall in our rear, and during the heavy cannonading which preceded the many others sought the seeming shelter of the grove. Just before the grand charge, at the request of General Alexander Hays, who commanded the Third Division, Second Corps, I gathered up all these men who lay in the grove, and General Hays formed them in line to the right of the Bryan House, which is the first house to the left of the monument on the line of battle as you go toward Round Top. At the time of the battle the grove extended to this house. I took position, with the remnant of my squad of sharp-shooters, on the right of this line. While the enemy were advancing to the Emmitsburg road, General Hays drilled the line in the manual of arms, allowed them to fire left oblique while the enemy were closing with our line to the left of the Bryan House, and then swung them down by a left wheel to the lane which then ran from the Bryan House to the Emmitsburg road, across
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