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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,040 1,040 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 90 90 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 56 56 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 55 55 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 40 40 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for July 1st or search for July 1st in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
f War to inform you that, as you have failed to arrest the advance of the enemy to the vicinity of Atlanta, and express no confidence that you can defeat or repel him, you are hereby relieved from the command of the Army and Department of Tennessee, which you will immediately turn over to General Hood. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General. Orders transferring the command of the army I have two reports of the strength of the army besides that of April 30th, already given: 1. Of July 1st, 39,746 infantry, 3855 artillery, and 10,484 cavalry,--total, 54,085. 2. Of July 10th, 36,901 infantry, 3755 artillery, and 10,270 cavalry,--total, 50,926.--J. E. J. to General Hood were written and published immediately, and next morning I replied to the telegram of the Secretary of War: Your dispatch of yesterday received and obeyed — command of the Army and Department of Tennessee has been transferred to General Hood. As to the alleged cause of my removal, I assert that Sherman's a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
this line. In a foot-note [p. 274] General Johnston says: I have two reports of the strength of the army besides that of April 30th, already given: 1. Of July 1st, 39,746 infantry, 3855 artillery, and 10,484 cavalry,--total, 54,085. 2. Of July 10th, 36,901 infantry, 3755 artillery, and 10,270 cavalry,--total, 50,926. The return of July 1st shows present for duty, all arms, officers and men, 64,578, instead of 54,085. (As in case of the return of April 30th, General Johnston gives only the effective total. ) The loss since June 10th is accounted for by 1114 dead, 711 deserters, 1042 increase in absent without leave (prisoners), and 3693 in inchich would reduce Major Dawes's total to about 67,000.--editors.] The return of July 10th gives the present for duty 60,032, instead of 50,926, the loss since July 1st being 1377 deserters, 526 dead, two regiments sent to Savannah, and prisoners and wounded. This with the Georgia militia (increased to about 9000 [G. W. Smith s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
: 14th Ill., Lieut.-Col. David P. Jenkins; 8th Mich., Lieut.-Col. Elisha Mix, Maj. William L. Buck, Maj. Edward Coates; McLaughlin's Ohio Squadron, Maj. Richard Rice. Independent Brigade, Col. Alex. W. Holeman, Lieut.-Col. Silas Adams: 1st Ky., Lieut.-Col. Silas Adams; 11th Ky., Lieut.-Col. Archibald J. Alexander. effective strength of the Union Army. date.Infantry.Artillery. Cavalry.Total. May 1st88,1884460 6,14998,797 June 1st (17th Corps joined June 8th 94,310560112,908 112,819 July 1st88,0865945 12,039106,070 August 1st75,6595499 10,51791,675 September 1st67,67446909,394 81,758 Losses: killed, 4423; wounded, 22,822; captured or missing, 4442 = 31,687. (Major E. C. Dawes, of Cincinnati, who has made a special study of the subject, estimates the Union loss at about 40,000, and the Confederate loss at about the same.) The Confederate Army. Army of Tennessee, General Joseph E. Johnston, General John B. Hood. Escort, Capt. Guy Dreux. Hardee's Corps, Lieut.-Ge
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Georgia militia about Atlanta. (search)
ery had been previously constructed, and short lines of trenches for infantry extended on each side, but not far enough to give cover to more than five hundred men. In a very short time after the troops were formed in this defensive position, the Federals, in large force, advanced against our front. The situation of the militia on the afternoon of the 4th will be better understood by reference to the movements that had been previously made in other portions of the theater of operations. July 1st, General Sherman reported to General Halleck: Schofield is now south of Olley's Creek. To-morrow night I propose to move McPherson from the left to the extreme right . . . The movement is substantially . . . straight for Atlanta. One of McPherson's divisions moved on the 2d, the rest of his army followed that night, and on the 4th the armies of Schofield and McPherson were concentrated in front of the militia, four or five miles west and a little south of the position then occupied by Gen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., A. J. Smith's defeat of Forrest at Tupelo (July 14th, 1864). (search)
his with his command from the Red River expedition. His men were scarcely settled in camp when the vanguard of Sturgis's retreating army made its appearance, having just been thoroughly defeated by Forrest at Brice's Cross-roads. General C. C. Washburn, then nominally in command of the large Union department of which Forrest had the real control (excepting the headquarters at Memphis), immediately ordered General Smith to make preparations for an expedition into Forrest's country. On July 1st we had assembled at La Grange, fifty miles east of Memphis. Our forces consisted of the First and Third divisions of the right wing of the Sixteenth Army Corps, commanded respectively by General J. A. Mower and Colonel David Moore, with a division of cavalry, commanded by General B. H. Grierson, and a brigade of colored troops, commanded by Colonel Edward Bouton--in all about 14,000 men with twenty guns. On July 5th the command started on its march southward, pushing on day after day,