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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 241 241 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 40 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 32 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 15 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for 1880 AD or search for 1880 AD in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
The defense of Atlanta. taken by permission and condensed from General Hood's work, advance and retreat, published by General G. T. Beauregard for the Hood orphan Memorial Fund, New Orleans, 1880.--editors. by John B. Hood, General, C. S. A. About 11 o'clock on the night of the 17th of July, 1864, I received a telegram from the War Office directing me to assume command of the Army of Tennessee. It is difficult to imagine a commander placed at the head of an army under more embarrassing circumstances than those against which I was left to contend. I was comparatively a stranger to the Army of Tennessee. The troops of the Army of Tennessee had for such length of time been subjected to the ruinous policy pursued from Dalton to Atlanta that they were unfitted for united action in pitched battle. They had, in other words, been so long habituated to security behind breastworks that they had become wedded to the timid defensive policy, and naturally regarded with distrust a comman
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
The invasion of Tennessee. taken by permission (and condensed) from General Hood's work, advance and retreat, published by General G. T. Beauregard for the Hood orphan Memorial Fund: New Orleans, 1880. by J. B. Hood, General, C. S. A. Unless the army could be heavily reenforced, there was but one plan to be adopted [after withdrawing from Atlanta. See p. 343]: by manoeuvres, to draw Sherman back into the mountains, then beat him in battle, and at least regain our lost territory. Therefore, after anxious reflection and consultation with the corps commanders, I determined to communicate with the President, and ascertain whether or not reinforcements could be obtained from any quarter. The reply from His Excellency conveyed no hope of assistance: Richmond, September 5th, 1864. . . . The necessity for reinforcements was realized, and every effort made to bring forward reserves, militia, and detailed men for the purpose. . . . No other resource remains. It is now req
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the Monocacy, Md.: July 9th, 1864. (search)
51st N. Y., Col. William Emerson; 87th Pa., Lieut.-Col. James A. Stahle; 10th Vt., Col. William W. Henry. Second Brigade, Col. Matthew R. McClennan: 9th N. Y. Heavy Art'y, Col. William H. Seward; 110th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Otho H. Binkley; 122d Ohio (detachment), Lieut. Charles J. Gibson; 126th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Aaron W. Ebright; 138th Pa., Maj. Lewis A. May. The 6th Md., 67th Pa., and part of the 122d Ohio, of this brigade, did not reach the battle-field. Union loss: k, 98; w, 594; m, 1188 == 1880. Effective strength (estimated): Eighth Corps troops, 2700; Ricketts's division (on the field), 3350 == 6050. The Confederate Army.--Lieutenant-General Jubal A. Early. Gordon's division, Maj.-Gen. John C. Breckinridge commanded Gordon's and Echols's divisions. Maj.-Gen. John B. Gordon. Evans's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. C. A. Evans, Col. E. N. Atkinson: 13th Ga.,----; 26th Ga., Col. E. N. Atkinson; 31st Ga.,----; 38th Ga.,----; 60th Ga.,----; 61st Ga., Col. J. H. Lamar; 12th Ga. Batt