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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. (search)
Gen. Henry W. Birge, Col. Thomas W. Porter: 9th Conn. (batt'n), Capt. John G. Healy; 12th Me., Lieut.-Col. Edwin Ilsley; 14th Me., Col. Thomas W. Porter, Capt. John K. Laing; 26th Mass. (batt'n), Lieut. John S. Cooke; 14th N. H., Capt. Theodore A. Ripley, Capt. Oliver H. Marston; 75th N. Y., Maj. Benjamin F. Thurber. Brigade loss: k, 28; w, 152; m, 169 =349. Second Brigade, Col. Edward L. Molineux: 13th Conn., Col. Charles D. Blinn; 11th Ind., Lieut.-Col. William W. Darnall; 22d Iowa, Col. Harvey Graham; 3d Mass. Cavalry (dismounted), Col. Lorenzo D. Sargent; 131st N. Y., Col. Nicholas W. Day; 159th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William Waltermire. Brigade loss: k, 19; w, 171; m, 97 = 287. Third Brigade, Col. Daniel Macauley, Lieut.-Col. Alfred Neafie: 38th Mass., Maj. Charles F. Allen; 128th N. Y., Capt. Charles R. Anderson; 156th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Alfred Neafie, Captain Alfred Cooley; 175th N. Y. (batt'n), Capt. Charles McCarthey; 176th N. Y., Maj. Charles Lewis. Brigade loss: k, 20; w, 87;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations South of the James River. (search)
ny were captured. Our shattered remnants made their way down and across the ravine and re-formed at my command on Reservoir Hill, in order, if needed; to support Graham's battery, which had just arrived and unlimbered on the top of the hill. The loss of the militia in this conflict was 12 killed (not counting the 2 artillerymetime by the sameroad. Coming suddenly upon the leading Federal files he was shot dead.--R. E. C. The moments gained at such fearful cost barely gave time for Graham's battery to cross the bridge. They came up Sycamore street at full gallop and unlimbered on the summit of Reservoir Hill just as the head of the Federal column elves already in possession of the city, halted in surprise. But just at this moment, while they were yet hesitating, Dearing's cavalry, which had followed after Graham's battery, charged upon Kautz's and Spear's column with irresistible impetuosity. The latter wheeled about, but re-formed on the top of the next hill and gallant
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 11.81 (search)
ds. From that bridge to the Appomattox — a distance of fully 4 1/2 miles--the line was defenseless. Early in the morning — at about 7 o'clock--General Dearing, on the Broadway and City Point roads, reported his regiment engaged with a large force of the enemy. The stand made by our handful of cavalry, near their breastworks, was most creditable to themselves and to their gallant commander, and the enemy's ranks, at that point, were much thinned by the accurate firing of the battery under Graham. But the weight of numbers soon produced its almost inevitable result, and, in spite of the desperate efforts of our men, the cavalry breastworks were flanked and finally abandoned by us, with the loss one howitzer. Still, Dearing's encounter with the enemy, at that moment and on that part of the field, was of incalculable advantage to the defenders of our line, inasmuch as it afforded time for additional preparation and the distribution of new orders by Wise. At 10 o'clock A. M. the sk