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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 718 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 564 12 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 458 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 458 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 376 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 306 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 280 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 279 23 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 237 5 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 216 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Fitz Lee or search for Fitz Lee in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. (search)
valry engagements of the war, in which Hampton and Fitz Lee opposed the advance of Sheridan at Hawes's Shop, tions, Breckinridge came from the Valley and joined Lee's army at the North Anna [Hanover Junction] with abous campaign from the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. General Lee held so completely the admiration and confidence Plank road on the afternoon of the 5th of May. That Lee did not strike Grant a damaging blow when he had him pass us again. Statement of Colonel Venable of General Lee's staff.--E. M. L. Whatever General Lee did, his General Lee did, his men thought it the best that could be done under the circumstances. Their feeling toward him is well illustrats much more secure after the arrival of the armies of Lee and Grant than it had been before. Nor can these resd, it would be idle to deny that they (as well as General Lee himself) were disappointed at the result of theirterrible strain that had been put upon them. Had General Lee so ordered, they would have attacked the Federal
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
of railroad, and got a position which, with proper supplies, we can hold out against the whole of Lee's army. I have ordered up the supplies. Beauregard, with a large portion of his force, was lend well-contested fight. General Grant will not be troubled with any further reinforcements to Lee from Beauregard's force. Benj. F. Butler, Major-General. On the evening of the 13th and mornlines of communication on the south side of the James. My idea, from the start, had been to beat Lee's army north of Richmond, if possible; then, after destroying his lines of communication north of the James River, to transfer the army to the south side, and besiege Lee in Richmond, or follow him south if he should retreat. After the battle of the Wilderness, it was evident that the enemy deeemy's supplies and manufactories was very great. To meet this movement under General Hunter, General Lee sent a force, perhaps equal to a corps, a part of which reached Lynchburg a short time before
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
and Meade, had by constant attrition worn down Lee's command until, in the minds of many officers 64, General Grant instructed General Meade that Lee's army would be his objective. Meade had with , with one-third of them held in reserve; while Lee, with his 62,000 men similarly disposed, would efore 94 guns and 56,819 enlisted men; but then Lee had, at the outset, his position in the Wilderner Longstreet, states that on the 2d of May General Lee, in the presence of a number of his officerf the troops. There was no intention to attack Lee in the Wilderness. The 6th of May was the lang of the 9th Sheridan started on a raid around Lee's army. See note, p. 117, and article to folhat Hancock should make a reconnoissance toward Lee's left, crossing the east and west bend of the night to attempt a crossing. Outline map of Lee's positions in the Wilderness and at Spotsylvans time there is no indication of any portion of Lee's army being detached for the defense of Richmo[13 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Hand-to-hand fighting at Spotsylvania. (search)
ed by General Upton on May 10th, and was considered to be the key to Lee's position. Just as the day was breaking, Barlow's and Birney's dng to Page and eight to Cutshaw. Upon reaching the second line of Lee's works, held by Wilcox's division, who by this time had become apprhe disaster to their comrades, Hancock met with stern resistance, as Lee in the meantime had been hurrying troops to Ewell from Hill on the rour left of a positive nature, but negatively a great deal. He kept Lee from reenforcing his center from that quarter. editors. As soonere, and over some of us went, many never to return. At this moment Lee's strong line of battle, hastily selected for the work of retrievingpton saw at once that this point must be held at all hazards; for if Lee should recover the angle, he would be enabled to sweep back our lineaustion. About midnight, after twenty hours of constant fighting, Lee withdrew from the contest at this point, leaving the Angle in our po
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Richmond raid. (search)
and rear of Meade, tempted by the rich prize of four thousand wagons. Torbert and Gregg were pitted against Hampton and Fitz Lee. The fight lasted from 4 P. M. until after dark, the field remaining in possession of the Union force; it was renewed easerving certain articles, the torch was applied to the trains and buildings, with 1,500,000 rations and medical stores for Lee's army. The railroad track and telegraph were destroyed for some distance, the work being continued throughout the night eld Station, where on the 25th the Cavalry Corps also reported, having fully performed its allotted task. It had deprived Lee's army, for the time, of its eyes and ears, damaged his communications, destroyed an immense quantity of supplies, killed d, having captured sixty prisoners. Having secured the desired position, Grant directed Sheridan to regain the touch with Lee's main army. To this end Gregg was sent in the direction of Hanover Court House, but was opposed at Hawes's Shop by the e
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.26 (search)
as I drew nearer: Go and tell General Lee and Dr. Fontaine to come here. I wheeled at once and went as fast as I could to do his bidding. Coming to the part of the line where General Lomax was, I told him Stuart was hurt and that he wanted General Fitz Lee. He pointed to the left and told me to hurry. Soon I found General Lee, and delivered the message. He was riding a light gray, if I remember, and instantly upon receipt of the news went like an arrow down the line. When I returned, StuarGeneral Lee, and delivered the message. He was riding a light gray, if I remember, and instantly upon receipt of the news went like an arrow down the line. When I returned, Stuart had been taken from his horse and was being carried by his men off the field. I saw him put in an ambulance and I followed it close behind. He lay without speaking as it went along, but kept shaking his head with an expression of the deepest disappointment. He died the next day, May 12th. Looking for A friend.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.27 (search)
ning, a succinct account of the last engagements between General Lee and General Grant, up to the 12th, and of the relative prate forces. Upon carefully examining it I saw that, as General Lee's army and my forces were on nearly a right line passing to Drewry's Bluff to confer with me. I proposed that General Lee, who was said to be, at that time, near Guiney's Stationd movement strike General Grant on his left flank, while General Lee should attack him in front. General Bragg, who certainly knew where and at what distance from Drewry's Bluff General Lee's army was at that moment, gave his unreserved approval tt — Richmond. That in my opinion it would be better for General Lee to take a voluntary step rearward through motives of str him, he could, and eventually did, continue to threaten General Lee's communications with his main sources of supply through to do. Nor could I, later on, accept the proposition of General Lee to leave a sufficient guard for the purpose of watching
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Butler's attack on Drewry's Bluff. (search)
neral Butler, November 11, 1863. The James River will never again present such a scene as that of the 5th of May, 1864. An army of forty thousand men was afloat on its waters, convoyed by various vessels of the navy, then under command of Admiral Lee. It was a motley array of vessels. Coasters and river steamers, ferry-boats and tugs, screw and side-wheel steamers, sloops, schooners, barges, and canal-boats raced or crawled up the stream toward the designated landing. General Butler, towould doubtless have fallen, and the Southern lines of communication would have been at the mercy of General Butler. He could then have waited patiently to be attacked, and the plum he so longed for might have dropped into his mouth. At any rate Lee could not have remained north of Richmond. Between a good plan of campaign and a faulty one, in this case, was only the width of a river, and the taking of the wrong bank of the Appomattox for a line of operations brought the campaign to a most l
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cold Harbor. (search)
a had been forced [see map, p. 136], but our progress had been barred as before by the enemy in stronger position than ever. The three corps which had crossed had withdrawn in the night-time and had commenced a movement toward the Pamunkey, a river formed by the junction of the North Anna and the South Anna. The passage of that river had been completed on May 28, and then, after three days of marching, interspersed with the usual amount of fighting, the army found itself again confronted by Lee's main line on the Totopotomoy. The operations which followed were Known as the battle of Cold Harbor. On the afternoon of May 31st Sheridan, who was on the left flank of the army, carried, with his cavalry, a position near the old well and cross-roads known as Old Cold Harbor, and, with his men dismounted behind rough breastworks, held it against Fitzhugh Lee until night. To this point, during the night, marched the vanguard of the Army of the Potomac, the Sixth Corps, under Wright, ove
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Eighteenth Corps at Cold Harbor. (search)
y Corps was debarking. On the 31st Sheridan, with two divisions of cavalry, had engaged and driven the enemy from their rifle-pits at Cold Harbor. The force he encountered consisted of infantry and dismounted cavalry, which proved that he was on Lee's flank when Lee had as yet but little infantry. Sheridan, thinking it unsafe to attempt to hold the place with his isolated command, retired from the town, but was met by an order to hold Cold Harbor at all hazards. Returning, he reoccupied theLee had as yet but little infantry. Sheridan, thinking it unsafe to attempt to hold the place with his isolated command, retired from the town, but was met by an order to hold Cold Harbor at all hazards. Returning, he reoccupied the works, and strengthening them held his position until relieved by the Sixth Corps, about 10 o'clock the next morning. On the 31st the determination was reached to concentrate at Cold Harbor, and that afternoon the Sixth Corps moved under orders for Cold Harbor, about fifteen miles distant; the Second Corps was ordered to march and take position on the left of the Sixth Corps, having about the same distance to, move. The Eighteenth Corps, at White House, about thirteen miles from Cold Harbo
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