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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 895 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 706 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 615 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 536 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 465 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 417 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 414 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 393 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 376 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 369 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Fitzhugh Lee or search for Fitzhugh Lee in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From Gettysburg to the coming of Grant. (search)
xth, under Major-General John Sedgwick, pressed Lee's retreating forces to the pass at Fairfield. July 10th, 1863. At this point it seemed that Lee intended to make a decided stand. His positionappahannock, where he took position confronting Lee. Before the season for operations had finally cmunicated intelligence which indicated that General Lee was making a formidable movement. This proway from Gettysburg for the purpose of engaging Lee, was ordered to retreat. It fell back in good ive battle. The movement was executed; but General Lee was not found in the position indicated, berossing the stream at Gainesville. The rest of Lee's command had been drawn off to the left for th 419. The Confederate loss (as reported by General Lee) was 6 killed, 39 wounded, and 1629 captured or missing = 1674. But General Lee says, Some reported as missing were probably killed or wounder by Stuart and the main body of the cavalry of Lee's army. Sedgwick assured him that all these po[12 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Kilpatrick's and Dahlgren's raid to Richmond. (search)
soners, and unite with Kilpatrick's main force entering the city from the north at 10 A. M. of Tuesday, March 1st. General Meade aided the enterprise with simultaneous demonstrations of the Sixth Corps and of Birney's division of the Third against Lee's left, and of Custer's cavalry division toward Charlottesville. Reaching Spotsylvania Court House at early dawn of February 29th, Kilpatrick moved south through Chilesburg to the Virginia Central Railroad, which [he struck during the day at Be with a company of the 9th Virginia. Dahlgren, at the head of his men, fell dead, pierced with a bullet. The greater part of his command was captured. On the second morning after Colonel Dahlgren's death, Lieutenant Pollard carried to General Fitzhugh Lee, in Richmond, some papers which he said had been taken from Dahlgren's body, together with the artificial leg which the young officer wore in place of a limb amputated a short time before. The documents were published in the Richmond news
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
Va., Col. R. H. Dulany; 11th Va.,----; 12th Va., Lieut.-Col. Thomas B. Massie; 35th Va. Battalion,----. Butler's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. M. C. Butler: 4th S. C., Col. B. H. Rutledge; 5th S. C., Col. John Dunovant; 6th S. C., Col. Hugh K. Aiken. Fitz. Lee's division, Maj.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. Lomax's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lunsford L. Lomax: 5th Va., Col. Henry C. Pate; 6th Va.,----; 15th Va.,----. Wickham's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Williams C. Wickham: 1st Va.,----; 2d Va., Col. Thomas T. Munford; 3d Maj.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. Lomax's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lunsford L. Lomax: 5th Va., Col. Henry C. Pate; 6th Va.,----; 15th Va.,----. Wickham's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Williams C. Wickham: 1st Va.,----; 2d Va., Col. Thomas T. Munford; 3d Va., Col. Thomas H. Owen; 4th Va.,----. W. H. F. Lee's division, Maj.-Gen. W. H. F. Lee. Chambliss's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John R. Chambliss, Jr.: 9th Va.,----; 10th Va.,----; 13th Va.,----. Gordon's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James B. Gordon: 1st N. C.,----; 2d N. C., Col. C. M. Andrews: 5th N. C., Col. S. B. Evans. horse artillery, Maj. R. P. Chew. Breathed's Battalion, Maj. James Breathed: Hart's (S. C.) Battery; Johnston's (Va.) Battery; McGregor's (Va.) Battery; Shoemaker's (Va.) Battery;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.26 (search)
The death of General J. E. B. Stuart. Reprinted from the Southern bivouac for September, 1884. by A private of the Sixth Virginia cavalry, C. S. A. Major-General Fitzhugh Lee, C. S. A. From a photograph. On the morning of the fight at Yellow Tavern, May 12th, 1864, I was acting as one of Stuart's couriers. At the beginning of it I was stationed in front of the tavern, under one of a row of trees that lined the way close by. To my left, about four hundred yards off, the enemy couof the troops, while with words of cheer he encouraged them. He kept saying: Steady, men, steady. Give it to them. Presently he reeled in his saddle. His head was bowed and his hat fell off. He turned and said as I drew nearer: Go and tell General Lee and Dr. Fontaine to come here. I wheeled at once and went as fast as I could to do his bidding. Coming to the part of the line where General Lomax was, I told him Stuart was hurt and that he wanted General Fitz Lee. He pointed to the left a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cold Harbor. (search)
y 28, and then, after three days of marching, interspersed with the usual amount of fighting, the army found itself again confronted by Lee's main line on the Totopotomoy. The operations which followed were Known as the battle of Cold Harbor. On the afternoon of May 31st Sheridan, who was on the left flank of the army, carried, with his cavalry, a position near the old well and cross-roads known as Old Cold Harbor, and, with his men dismounted behind rough breastworks, held it against Fitzhugh Lee until night. To this point, during the night, marched the vanguard of the Army of the Potomac, the Sixth Corps, under Wright, over roads that were many inches deep in dust. The night was sultry and oppressive. Many of our horses and mules were dying of thirst, yet they had to be forced through streams without halting to drink. Frequent messengers from Sheridan came during the night, urging the importance of rapid movement. About 9 the next day (June 1st) the head of the column reache
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
rt of the enemy went toward Gordonsville, whilst fragments were driven off on the road to Louisa Court House. In their headlong career these latter came in contact with the First Brigade, which, being engaged toward its rear by the advance of Fitzhugh Lee's division, coming from Louisa Court House, was compelled to abandon some captures it had made from the led horses and trains of the force that was engaging the rest of the division. General Custer's operations are described by Colonel A. C gave orders to follow him up, but it was daylight before these orders could be carried out, the fight not having ended until 10 P. M. Hampton reports a loss in his own division of 59 killed, 258 wounded, and 295 missing; aggregating 612. Fitzhugh Lee's losses are not given. General Sheridan reported this day's fight as by far the most brilliant one of the present campaign. The enemy's loss was very heavy. My loss in killed and wounded will be about 575. Of this number 490 were wo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The cavalry fight at Trevilian Station. (search)
igher up the road toward Gordonsville. Besides his own division Hampton had Fitzhugh Lee's, consisting of Wickham's and Lomax's brigades, and this division was in ou plans. General Hampton informed us he expected to form a junction with General Fitzhugh Lee at Clayton's Store, where he would engage Sheridan. Rosser returned to g up my brigade and attack at once, telling me that he was expecting to hear Fitzhugh Lee's guns on my right on his way up by another road from Louisa Court House. II heard firing on my right and expected every moment to form a junction with Fitzhugh Lee. General Hampton also informed me, when I moved in from the railroad, that hken was stationed with the 6th South Carolina, as I supposed it was protected by Lee's division. Colonel Wright had some difficulty in the thick undergrowth in findgia Cavalry, ten companies, and Millen's Georgia battalion, four companies. Fitzhugh Lee's division was composed of Wickham's brigade, the 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th Virgi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. (search)
. Venable, Lieutenant-Colonel, C. S. A., of General Lee's staff. Uniform of the Maryland Guard C. B. A. During the winter of 1863-64 General Lee's headquarters were near Orange Court Housee Commissary Department. During the winter General Lee neglected no interest of his soldiers. He mber by Meade's Mine-Run campaign. In this General Lee, finding that Meade failed to attack the Co winter quarters and rested until May 4th, when Lee marched out in the early morning to meet the Fetill farther to the right into the Wilderness. Lee rode with Hill at the head of his column. He wmonths. Heth's and Wilcox's divisions, under Lee's eye, maintained themselves well against the hs cavalry on the right had driven Wilson bask. Lee slept on the field not far from his line of batick, in parallel columns, down the Plank road. Lee was in the midst of Hill's sullenly retreating and reformed the line of battle under his eye. Lee's presence at the front aroused his men to grea[8 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
25th, leaving Anderson's force in front of Sheridan, Early moved with his four divisions and Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry to Leetown, from which place he dispatched Lee toward Williamsport while he crossedLee toward Williamsport while he crossed the railroad at Kearneysville and moved Sprout's Spring Mill, Opequon River, Va., hospital of the Sixth Army Corps during the battle of Winchester, September 19, 1864. from a War-time sketch. tt House. Fitzhugh Fac-Simile (reduced) of President Lincoln's letter to General Sheridan. Lee's cavalry remained with Early. About this time General Grant visited the Valley and found everin, so that it was necessary for me to retire through the town.--letter from General Early to General Lee, dated October 9TH, 1864. These attacks were made by the cavalry without any knowledge of the. For it appears that Kershaw and his command had not proceeded beyond Culpeper in his march to Lee's army before he was ordered to return to Early, the news of whose overthrow at Winchester, and a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
him to report to General Grant, at headquarters. General Sheridan replied, in effect, that Map of the battle of five Forks. In his official report, General Fitzhugh Lee gives the following account of the battle of Five Forks from the Confederate point of view: Our position in the vicinity of Dinwiddie Court House [MarcPickett's intrenched line began. The Confederate infantry brigades were posted from right to left as follows: Terry, Corse, Steuart, Ransom, and Wallace. General Fitzhugh Lee, commanding the cavalry, had placed W. H. F. Lee's two brigades on the right of the line, Munford's division on the left, and Rosser's in rear of Hatcher'sll gives the following account of the battle of Sailor's Creek and the capture of his corps: On crossing a little stream known as Sailor's Creek, I met General Fitzhugh Lee, who informed me that a large force of cavalry held the road just in front of General [R. H.] Anderson, and was so strongly posted that he had halted a sho
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