hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Duck River (Tennessee, United States) or search for Duck River (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 5 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
, p. 711] wrote a plan of campaign which was delivered to me on the 18th by his secretary, Colonel Sale. It prescribed my invasion of Tennessee with an army of 75,000 men, including Longstreet's corps, then near Morristown, Tennessee. When necessary supplies and transportation were collected at Dalton, the additional troops, except Longstreet's, would be sent there; and this army and Longstreet's corps would march to meet at Kingston, on the Tennessee River, and thence into the valley of Duck River. Being invited to give my views, I suggested that the enemy could defeat the plan, either by attacking one of our two bodies of troops on the march, with their united forces, or by advancing against Dalton before our forces there should be equipped for the field; for it was certain that they would be able to take the field before we could be ready. I proposed, therefore, that the additional troops should be sent to Dalton in time to give us the means to beat the Federal army there, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
n rear of Schofield's forces, then at Pulaski, before they were able to reach Duck River. That night headquarters were established at Rawhide, twelve miles north of als at Pulaski became alarmed, and, by forced marches, reached Columbia, upon Duck River, in time to prevent our troops from cutting them off. Colonel Presstman and his assistants laid the pontoons [over Duck River] during the night of the 28th, about three miles above Columbia; orders to move at dawn the following day having bagons and men in the vicinity of Spring Hill. Moreover, from the crossing at Duck River to the point referred to by General Hood, the turnpike was never in view, norHarpeth, eighteen miles from Spring Hill. Lieutenant-General Lee had crossed Duck River after dark the night previous, and, in order to reach Franklin, was obliged t those of Cheatham and Stevenson. The army bivouacked in line of battle near Duck River on the night of the 1 8th. The following day we crossed the river and proc
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.65 (search)
General Cheatham at Spring Hill. Reprinted from the Southern bivouac for April, 1885. dated November 30th, 1881. by B. F. Cheatham, Major-General, C. S. A. In pursuance of orders my command [formerly Hardee's] crossed Duck River on the morning of the 29th of November, 1864, the division of Major-General [P. R.] Cleburne in advance, followed by that of Major-General [W. B.] Bate, the division of Major-General [J. C.] Brown in the rear. The march was made as rapidly as the condition of the roads would allow, and without occurrence of note, until about 3 o'clock P. i., when I arrived at Rutherford's Creek, two and one-half miles from Spring Hill. At this point General Hood gave me verbal orders as follows: That I should get Cleburne across the creek and send him forward toward Spring Hill, with instructions to communicate with General Forrest, who was near the village, ascertain from him the position of the enemy, and attack immediately; that I should remain at the creek, assi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. (search)
General George H. Thomas. From a photograph. to Nashville cross Duck River, and where there were less than 800 men to guard the bridges. Ther hour Forrest would have been in possession of the crossings of Duck River, and the only line of communication with Nashville would have beest succeeded in placing one of his divisions on the north side of Duck River before noon of the 28th, and forced back the Union cavalry on roandurance by any in the Confederate army,--was making its way over Duck River at Davis's Ford, about five miles east of Columbia. The weathereld's force — Wood's, Cox's, and Ruger's (in part)--were still at Duck River. Thus night closed down upon the solitary division, on whose bolithout provoking a reply. General Schofield, who had remained at Duck River all day, reached Spring Hill about 7 P. M., with Ruger's divisionreat consternation. Wood's division, which had followed Cox from Duck River, was marched along to the east of the pike, to protect the train,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
to give the army a breathing-spell and to insure the safety of its materiel, the cavalry withdrew to the north side of Duck River, and was so disposed as to watch the enemy's movements either to the right or the left. It was here strengthened by thof Croxton's and Capron's brigades gave notice of the appearance of the Confederate cavalry at the various fords of the Duck River between Columbia and the crossing of the Lewisburg turnpike. Shortly afterward the pickets were driven in, and at 2:10avorable to mounted men; but the occasion was a grave one. It indicated either the advance of Hood's whole army, as at Duck River, or a turning movement by his cavalry; and in either case, from the fact that the National infantry and artillery were hat had not thrown their arms away into an effective rear-guard of eight brigades, each about five hundred strong. The Duck River proved impassable for the National cavalry till the single pontoon-train of the army could be brought forward, and this