Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Dublin (Virginia, United States) or search for Dublin (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
intercepted him about New Market and handled him roughly, capturing 6 guns and some 900 men out of 6000. See papers to follow.--editors. The plan had been for an advance of Sigel's forces in columns. Though the one under his immediate command failed ingloriously, the other proved more fortunate. Under Crook and Averell, his western column advanced from the Gauley in West Virginia at the appointed time, and with more happy results. They reached the Virginia and Tennessee railroad at Dublin, and destroyed a depot of supplies besides tearing up several miles of road and burning the bridge over New River. Having accomplished this, they recrossed the Alleghanies to Meadow Bluffs, and there awaited further orders. Butler embarked at Fort Monroe with all his command, except the cavalry and some artillery which moved up the south bank of the James River. His steamers moved first up Chesapeake Bay and York River as if threatening the rear of Lee's army. At midnight they turned b
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., John Morgan in 1864. (search)
y destroyed and the transmission of supplies from all that region prevented. It was necessary, therefore, at once to confront and cripple, if not completely defeat, both columns. General A. G. Jenkins, with his cavalry brigade, detached from the Army of Northern Virginia, put himself in front of Crook, but was not strong enough to cope with him. Morgan hastened the four hundred dismounted men of his command to the assistance of General Jenkins. Colonel D. H. Smith, commanding them, reached Dublin on the morning of the 10th and found General Jenkins there, hard pressed by the enemy, and that gallant officer severely wounded. Smith at once reported to Colonel John. McCausland, who had taken command, and the timely reinforcement restored the battle, which had been sorely against the Confederates. Holding the enemy in check until sunset, the Confederates retreated to New River Bridge and encamped in a position to protect that structure. [See map, p. 478.] In the meantime General M
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations in east Tennessee and south-west Virginia. (search)
one around to the rear of the Federals, intercepted some two hundred fugitives. A few escaped across the river. In May, 1864, a formidable force under General Crook: advanced up the Kanawha and New rivers and reached the railroad at Dublin, in Pulaski County. An inferior force, commanded by General Albert G. Jenkins, engaged the advancing Federals on the 9th of May at Cloyd's Mountain, and Jenkins was mortally wounded and his force defeated. General Crook destroyed the depot at Dublin andDublin and the large bridge over New River. On the 10th of May a large cavalry Brigadier-General Jacob Ammen, U. S. V. From a photograph. General Ammen commanded the District of east Tennessee, April 10, 1864, to January 14, 1865. force, under General Averell, made an advance on Wytheville, but was met at Crockett's Cove by General John H. Morgan and defeated, leaving forty dead on the field. In June, 1864, Colonel E. F. Clay, of the 1st Kentucky Mounted Rifles, in command of a small brigade of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sigel in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864. (search)
May, while the cavalry advanced to Cedar Creek and Strasburg. To meet the wishes of General Crook, the cavalry force left at Beverly was sent forward into Pocahontas County, spreading false rumors as to our strength and movements. General Crook, with the principal force, of from 7000 to 8000 men, left Fayette, not far from the mouth of New River, on the 2d of May, moving by Raleigh Court House and Princeton toward Newbern, meeting and beating the enemy at Cloyd's Mountain, then again near Dublin and Newbern, and after destroying the bridge over New River and the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad for a considerable distance, returned by Union and Lewisburg to Meadow Bluff, where he arrived on the 19th of May. General Averell, at the head of two thousand cavalry, moved on a more western line against Saltville, with the intention of destroying the salt-works at that place, but, in spite of fighting bravely at that point and at Wytheville, was forced to withdraw, and followed Crook on his