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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for April, 1865 AD or search for April, 1865 AD in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 22: the War on the Potomac and in Western Virginia. (search)
the insurgents commenced erecting a battery which might completely destroy the water communication with the Capital. Captain Ward, of the Potomac flotilla, was with the Freeborn, his flagship, below this point, when information of the presence of an insurgent force on the promontory reached him. Falls Church in 1865. this is a view of the ancient Church which gives the name to the village, mentioned on page 526, as it appeared when the writer visited and sketched it, at the close of April, 1865.. the Church is a cotemporary with Pohick Church, near Mount Vernon, built before the Revolution, of brick, and in a style similar to the latter. It is about eight miles north of Alexandria, and the same distance west of Washington City. The village that has grown up around the Church was built chiefly by Massachusetts people who had settled there, but the congregation of this Church (Episcopalians) were chiefly native Virginians, and were nearly all secessionists. Their rector, a sec
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 23: the War in Missouri.-doings of the Confederate Congress. --Affairs in Baltimore.--Piracies. (search)
esented it, sumptuously furnished, to the President for a residence. The view of the residence of Davis in Richmond, given on the preceding page, is from a sketch made by the writer just after that city was evacuated by the Confederates, in April, 1865. It was a brick house, painted a stone color. On the corner diagonally opposite was the residence of A. H. Stephens. In front of the residence of Davis is seen a sentry-box, and beyond it the stables belonging to the establishment. The houitulation a few days before. A picture of it will be found in another part of this work. A small black-and-tan terrier dog that belonged to Mrs. Davis was left in the house when the President hastily fled from Richmond, at midnight, early in April, 1865. In successful imitation of his chief, Beauregard, who arrived at Richmond on the 1st of June, 1861. and proceeded to take command of the Confederate troops in the Department of Alexandria, issued a proclamation from Camp Pickens, Manassa
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 24: the called session of Congress.--foreign relations.--benevolent organizations.--the opposing armies. (search)
ee page 525. There were three important bridges spanning the Potomac in the vicinity of Washington City, which were well guarded. The Upper, or Chain Bridge, where the banks of the Chain Bridge. this is from a sketch made at the close of April, 1865, from the Maryland or District of Columbia side of the river. The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal is seen in the foreground. The Potomac is here broken into rapids called the little Falls. river are high and precipitous, was beyond the Union lined), was at and near Manassas Junction, then considered one of the strongest military positions for offense or defense between Washington Remains of Fort Jackson, at the long Bridge. this is from a sketch made by the author at the close of April, 1865, and shows the embankments of Fort Jackson on the right, and the remains of the pickets, with the railway, in the foreground. On the left is a public house of entertainment, and just beyond it is seen a portion of the long Bridge. The Capito
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 25: the battle of Bull's Run, (search)
e ordered the whole body to fall back to Centreville. Beauregard had made his Headquarters, during the engagement, at the house of Wilmer McLean, near McLean's Ford. Soon after this, when military occupation made that region almost untenable, Mr. McLean went with his family to another part of Virginia, near Appomattox Court House, hoping for quiet. There came the same armies, after a lapse of almost four years, and under his roof Grant and Lee signed articles of capitulation early in April, 1865, for the surrender of the Confederate forces under the latter. This severe skirmish was called by the Confederates the battle of Bull's Run, and was claimed by them as a victory. The loss of the combatants was about equal, that of McDowell being seventy-three, and of Beauregard, seventy. Report of Colonel Richardson to General Tyler, July 19, 1861; Report of General Tyler to General McDowell, July 27, 1861; Report of General Beauregard to Adjutant-General Cooper, August, 1861; The C.