hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,016 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 573 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 458 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 394 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 392 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 384 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 258 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 256 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 244 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) or search for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 97 results in 22 document sections:

1 2 3
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 1: the political Conventions in 1860. (search)
om we admire and respect, there is one standing pre-eminently before this country — a young and gallant son of the South. He then named John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, as a nominee for the Presidency. Mr. Breckinridge was then Vice-president of the United States under President Buchanan, and subsequent events show that he wowded with spectators, were festooned with numerous Union banners. The first Presbyterian Church, Baltimore, in 1860. The venerable John J. Crittenden, of Kentucky, Chairman of the National Constitutional Union Committee called the Convention to order, and on his nomination, Washington Hunt, once Governor of the State of Nen--ten in all. Toward evening, after a recess, Governor Hunt was elected permanent President. When the subject of a platform was proposed, Leslie Coombs, of Kentucky, an ardent follower and admirer of Henry Clay, took the floor, and put the Convention in the best of humor by a characteristic little speech. He declared that h
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 2: preliminary rebellious movements. (search)
pected wrong and oppression ; See The Church and, the Rebellion, by R. L. Stanton, D. D., of Kentucky. and thousands upon thousands of men and women, regarding them as oracles of wisdom and truth, e conspirators, see a volume entitled The Church and the Rebellion, by R. L. Stanton, D. D., of Kentucky. The common people --the non-slaveholders and the small slaveholders — whom the ruling clasvery as Mr. Stephens, once said on the floor of Congress, in rebuke of disunion sentiments:--If Kentucky, to-morrow, unfurls the banner of resistances I never will fight under that banner; I owe a par, held back, when invited by conspirators to plunge into secession. So did Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware, all Slave-labor States. The Governor of Tennesse Jay's Treaty with Great Britain should be ratified by the United States Senate; and the famous Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions of 1798, in which the doctrine of State Supremacy was broadly inculcat
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 3: assembling of Congress.--the President's Message. (search)
is reported to have said, in one of his speeches in the Northwest, alluding to recent disturbances, to burnings and poisonings there, that Texas was excited by free debate. Well, Sir, continued Clingman, with peculiar emphasis, a Senator from Texas The Senators from Texas were John Hemphill and Louis T. Wigfall. told me, the other day, that a good many of those debaters were hanging up by the trees in that country! When Clingman ceased speaking, the venerable John Jay Crittenden, of Kentucky, tottering with physical infirmities and the burden of seventy-five years--the Nestor of Congress — instantly arose and mildly rebuked the Senator, while his seditious words were yet ringing in the ears of his amazed peers. I rise here, he said, to express the hope, and that alone, that the bad example of the gentleman will not be followed. He spoke feelingly of costly sacrifices made for the establishment of the Union; of its blessings and promises; and hoped that there was not a Senator
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 4: seditious movements in Congress.--Secession in South Carolina, and its effects. (search)
land; W. G. Whiteley, of Delaware; M. W. Tappen, of New Hampshire; John L. N. Stratton, of New Jersey; F. M. Bristow, of Kentucky; J. S. Morrill, of Vermont; T. A. R. Nelson, of Tennessee; Wm. McKee Dunn, of Indiana; Miles Taylor, of Louisiana; ReubeVirginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri. These were all Slave-labor States. This scheme for dividing the States, and the accompanying propositnd a disposition to compromise much for the sake of fraternal good — will and peace. On motion of Lazarus W. Powell, of Kentucky, a Committee of Thirteen was appointed by Vice-President Breckinridge, to consider the. condition of the country, and re Constitution or otherwise, for its pacification. This Committee consisted of L. W. Powell and John J. Crittenden, of Kentucky; William H. Seward, of New York; J. Collamer, of Vermont; William Bigler, of Pennsylvania; R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia;
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 5: events in Charleston and Charleston harbor in December, 1860.--the conspirators encouraged by the Government policy. (search)
increase his supply of ammunition, History of the War for the Preservation of the Union: by Lorenzo H. Whiting, 1. 145. and Major Robert Anderson, a native of Kentucky, and a meritorious officer in the war with Mexico, was appointed to succeed him in November. He arrived there on the 20th, and assumed .the command. He was conion, December 2, 1862. that Rhode Island, Delaware, and Texas had not drawn, at the close of 1860, their annual quotas of arms, and Massachusetts, Tennessee, and Kentucky only in part; while Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Kansas were, by order of the Secretary of War, supplied withmorandum of verbal instructions from the Secretary of War, signed D. C. Buell, Assistant Adjutant-General. This officer (afterward a major-general in command in Kentucky and Tennessee) was sent to Major Anderson with verbal instructions from his Government, and, after his arrival at Fort Moultrie, he committed them to writing. T
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 6: Affairs at the National Capital.--War commenced in Charleston harbor. (search)
abroad, it created intense excitement. In the Freelabor States, as we have observed, it produced joyful emotions. In the Slave-labor States it kindled anger, and intensified the hurricane of passion then sweeping over them. From these, proffers of sympathy and military aid were sent to the South Carolinians, and they were amazingly strengthened by the evidences of hearty co-operation in their revolutionary designs, which came not only from the Cotton-producing States, but from Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri, and even from Maryland. The National Capital, in the mean time, became the theater of important and startling events, calculated to add to the feverish excitement throughout the country. Congress had not adjourned during the holidays, as usual. On the day when the South Carolina Ordinance of Secession was passed, December 20, 1860. the House of Representatives was discussing the Pacific Railway Bill. Half an hour after that ordinance was adopted, the telegraph t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
n sunshine and in storm; that his heart was bleeding because of the distractions of his country; that he was a native of Kentucky, which had no navy, and, therefore, he knew not where he should go to make a livelihood in his declining years; that he This was eight days before Thompson resigned. A coercive policy has been adopted by the Administration. Mr. Holt, of Kentucky, our bitter foe, has been made Secretary of War. Fort Pulaski is in danger. The Abolitionists are defiant. On the same o South Carolina, J. A. Elmore; to Maryland, A. F. Hopkins; to Virginia. Frank Gilmer; to Tennessee, L. Pope Walker; to Kentucky, Stephen F. Hale to Arkansas, John A. Winston. Georgia.--To Missouri, Luther J. Glenn; to Virginia, Henry L. Benning.Wirt Adams; to Texas, H. H. Miller; to Arkansas, Geo. R. Fall; to Florida, E. M. Yerger; to Tennessee, T. J. Wharton; to Kentucky, W. S. Featherstone; to North Carolina, Jacob Thompson; to Virginia, Fulton Anderson; to Maryland, A. H. Handy; to Delaw
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 8: attitude of the Border Slave-labor States, and of the Free-labor States. (search)
he Governor of Tennessee the people overwhelmingly for the Union position of Kentucky, 199. Convention of Union and Douglas men action of the Legislature attitud State would cease. It was a delusive hope, as we shall observe hereafter. Kentucky, a Border State of great importance, having a population, in 1860, of one mille State, held on the 8th of January, 1861. it was resolved that the rights of Kentucky should be maintained in the Union. They were in favor of a convention of the Siah Magoffin. the last extremity. This action was taken by the authorities of Kentucky, because the Legislatures of several of the Free-labor States had offered trooes to the Peace Congress to meet at Washington City. Such was the attitude of Kentucky at the beginning. A little later, its public authorities and other leading me to surrender alleged fugitive slaves on the requisition of the authorities of Kentucky and Tennessee; denied the right of secession; affirmed the loyalty of his Stat
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 9: proceedings in Congress.--departure of conspirators. (search)
a provisional government, which is the plan of the dictators. They resolved, he said, to use every means in their power to force the Legislatures of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Arkansas, Texas, Virginia, and Maryland, into the adoption of revolutionary measures. They had already possessed themselves of all the avenues of infstem, and thus to undermine what cannot be directly overthrown. Washington's Farewell Address to his Countrymen.--I most cheerfully accord to the Senator from Kentucky purity of motive and patriotic intentions and purposes, said Henry. Wilson, one of the most active and vigilant men in the Senate. While I believe every pulsatportion of the best men of the Revolution voted against it, and that it was carried in some of the States by treachery. He sneered at the venerable Senator from Kentucky (who had fought for his country when this traitor was yet an infant, and had entered Congress as a member when this conspirator was a schoolboy), because of his
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 10: Peace movements.--Convention of conspirators at Montgomery. (search)
s, F. E. Zollicoffer, William H. Stephens. Kentucky.--William O. Butler, James B. Clay, Joshua F.r amending the Constitution for the purpose. Kentucky would be satisfied with the Crittenden Comproconclusion of this address, Mr. Wickliffe, of Kentucky, offered a resolution that the Convention sho the Convention was opened by Mr. Guthrie, of Kentucky, who offered a resolution that a committee ofna, Thomas Ruffin; Virginia, James A. Seddon; Kentucky, James Guthrie; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; Te proposed that the several States should join Kentucky in this request. to consider amendments to thmpshire, Vermont, Kansas--10. Noes--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Caroliaryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kanhat whereas the Legislatures of the States of Kentucky, New Jersey, and Illinois had applied to Cong other was dark and piercing. He was born in Kentucky, and was taken to reside in Mississippi in ea[5 more...]
1 2 3