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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 1: the political Conventions in 1860. (search)
a speech, when the Rev. Charles Hanckel, of Charleston, read a prayer, and the Convention proceededcratic National Convention, held in 1860, at Charleston and Baltimore, page 17. These utterances forrolinians, who were joyous over the result. Charleston, that night, was the scene of unbounded pleae dress circle was crowded with the women of Charleston. They had hitherto filled the galleries of opinion concerning the platforms offered at Charleston was suppressed; and on the second day of thethe resolution respecting the adjournment at Charleston, by which the States represented by the seceort, which he had submitted in Convention at Charleston, and it was adopted without dissent, as the adjournment of the Democratic Conventions at Charleston, representatives of a new political organizaDemocracy, who had agreed so beautifully, at Charleston; another for the Republicans, about to assemsolute disruption of the Democratic party at Charleston and Baltimore, a prospect for the election o[5 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 2: preliminary rebellious movements. (search)
ion of National officers, 48. rejoicings in Charleston and Columbia excitement in Slave-labor Stat pulpit of the Second Presbyterian Church in Charleston, after stating that he stood there in God's uction of military works for the assault on Fort Sumter, and also of having fired the first shot athem that he was then a resident of Charleston, in South Carolina, and boasted that he was the person who fired the first shot at Sumter. Mr. Ely, member of Congress, who was among the prisoners, spenited States District Court had assembled in Charleston, over which one of the leaders of rebellion,, the enthusiasm of the rebellious people in Charleston was unbounded and irrepressible. The conspiork, begun so hopefully in the Convention at Charleston, in April, was now wellnigh finished in Novee, lying at our wharves, said a message from Charleston, has hoisted the Palmetto flag, and fired a saying:--I would be especially glad to be in Charleston next week, and witness your Convention of de[4 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 4: seditious movements in Congress.--Secession in South Carolina, and its effects. (search)
dings of the Convention, 102. rejoicings in Charleston, 104. signing of the Ordinance, 106. Commijoicings because of the revolutionary Act at Charleston, 113. Impressions in the Free-labor States,p before a large congregation of citizens in Charleston, November 30, 1860. and, in a speech which owed by speeches (some from Northern men, in Charleston on business), in which the people were addreproposed an immediate flight, by railway, to Charleston. William Porcher Miles, just from his abandhivalry of South Carolina did scamper off to Charleston the next morning, December 18, 1860. where opedia, 1861, page 649. On assembling at Charleston, the Convention proceeded at once to busines historical associations. When an attack on Charleston was expected, in 1776, the church spire, whird, of Charleston, who, after the attack on Fort Sumter, in April, 1861, sent it to Dr. Fogg, by thIt is related of the late Judge Pettigru, of Charleston, who resisted the madness of the secessionis[22 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 5: events in Charleston and Charleston harbor in December, 1860.--the conspirators encouraged by the Government policy. (search)
loyalists, 131. Mrs. Anderson's journey to Fort Sumter and back, 133. preparations to attack Fortpower. Floyd had summoned Colonel Huger, of Charleston, to Washington, for the real purpose, no douhad the President ordered re-enforcements to Charleston, to take them from the already small garrisoparent when we consider the ease with which Forts Sumter, Pickens, Taylor, and Jefferson held out wiwe will send no more troops to the harbor of Charleston. But General Cass was firm. These forts, hus one. A guard-boat had been sent out from Charleston just as the last vessel left Sullivan's Islafifty-five artillerists-eighty in all. entered Sumter, their position was an extremely perilous one. without intermission until their arrival in Charleston, late on Saturday night. She neither ate, dr which was filled with rough men hurrying to Charleston to join in an attack on Fort Sumter. They wYork, she replied. Where are you going? To Charleston. Where else? Don't know; get me a carriage[82 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 6: Affairs at the National Capital.--War commenced in Charleston harbor. (search)
e Commissioners preparations to re-enforce Fort Sumter, 152. expedition of the Star of the West, 1860. He then urged the seizure of the forts, Sumter particularly, without a moment's delay. Neith just heard of the capture of the Arsenal at Charleston and half a million of dollars' worth of prop. it was proposed to send her with troops to Charleston. The Secretary of the Navy (Toucey), it is ult to their Sovereign State. Every man int Charleston and vicinity, liable to do military duty, wa withheld the dispatch. The insurgents at Charleston were thus enabled to prepare for her recepti a merchant vessel on a commercial errand to Charleston. When the first shot was fired upon her, heese South Carolina conspirators, it had made Charleston a ghastly ruin, in which not one of these messured Anderson that any attempt to re-enforce Sumter would be resisted. He left him to decide for jor Anderson for the immediate surrender of Fort Sumter to the authorities of South Carolina. They[39 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 8: attitude of the Border Slave-labor States, and of the Free-labor States. (search)
will jeopardize the tranquillity of the Republic; and that the evacuation of Fort Sumter Is the first step that should be taken to restore harmony and peace. For Reiterating the idea put forth a few weeks before by the Rev. Dr. Smythe, of Charleston, in denunciation of the doctrines of the Declaration of Independence, See f events with intense interest; and when the National flag was dishonored at Fort Sumter, their patriotism was most conspicuous, as we shall observe hereafter. Neon, but there was no occasion for its special revealment until the attack on Fort Sumter, in April, 1861, when it blazed out terribly for the enemies of the Republico call for them at that time, and nothing was done until after the attack on Fort Sumter. Then the people of Wisconsin gave men and money freely to the great cause secession as revolution; condemning in severest terms the treasonable acts at Charleston, saying, that when one or more States appear in military array against the Go
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 9: proceedings in Congress.--departure of conspirators. (search)
han any other statesman now living. These revelations; the defiant attitude of the traitors in Congress, in speech and action; the revolutionary movements at Charleston; the startling picture of the perilous condition of the country, given in a Special Message of the President on the 8th, January, 1861. and the roar of the tors to stay its progress, he contented himself with offering insufficient reasons why he had not already done so, by re-enforcing and provisioning the garrison in Fort Sumter before it was too late, and also by urging Congress to submit to the demands of the revolutionists. In this the President acted consistently. He well knew tword of encouragement to the loyal people that he would heed the warning voice of the veteran General Wool, and others, who implored the Government not to yield Fort Sumter to the insurgents, and thereby cause the kindling of a civil war. So long as the United States keep possession of that fort, said Wool, the independence of Sout
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 10: Peace movements.--Convention of conspirators at Montgomery. (search)
that most lamentable and pregnant error of the attack on Fort Sumter had been committed, says Professor Morse, in a letter toith ludicrous solemnity laid aside his judicial robes at Charleston, See page 48. sent word that he would like to put thee from the beginning. From the hour when Anderson entered Sumter, See page 129. they had counseled its seizure. In the tes there as cowards and imbeciles. If the people of Charleston, he said, should burn the whole crew in effigy, I should Mr. Memminger. One of them was from some young women of Charleston, and was composed of a blue cross on a red field, with ssion from a. gentleman of taste and skill in the city of Charleston, who offers another model, which embraces the same idea usurpers at Montgomery. It declared February 14. that Fort Sumter belonged to South Carolina alone. It was the pet victimrts, said the Mercury, to obtain peaceable possession of Fort Sumter, and a submission, for two months, to the insolent milit
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 11: the Montgomery Convention.--treason of General Twiggs.--Lincoln and Buchanan at the Capital. (search)
red from New Orleans to John Forsyth. Charleston, to take charge of all the insurgent forces ecause of his gallant and useful conduct at Fort Sumter, and Lieutenant-General Scott asked the Pre the dignity of their Sovereign nation. While Sumter was in possession of National troops, they felthe valuation of the public property within Fort Sumter should be accounted for by the State, upon sk the President to agree not to re-enforce Fort Sumter, in the mean time. I am not clothed with ped, that no re-enforcements will be sent to Fort Sumter in the interval, and that the public peace t power. When this correspondence reached Charleston, Governor Pickens ordered Hayne to present tfic purpose in continuing the occupation of Fort Sumter until the question shall be settled by compthe authorities of that State shall assault Fort Sumter, and peril the lives of the handful of bravand of South Carolina for the evacuation of Fort Sumter was refused; it remained only for the South[3 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 12: the inauguration of President Lincoln, and the Ideas and policy of the Government. (search)
t to re-enforce and relieve the garrison in Fort Sumter, 306. Monday, the 4th of March, 1861, wias to remove the troops from Forts Pickens and Sumter, or they will be removed for him. He has to co Crawford recited the assurances concerning Fort Sumter which they had received from the Secretary d given were well or ill founded in respect to Sumter. Your reply was:-- Faith, as to Sumter, fullySumter, fully kept — wait and see. In the morning's paper I read :-- An authorized messenger from President Lincotherwise by force. This was on the 8th, at Charleston, the day following your last assurance, and r peace, and believing further efforts to hold Sumter would be useless, and perhaps mischievous — co kept, he should send a messenger at once to Charleston, to inform Governor Pickens that he was abouy fitted out, namely, one for the relief of Fort Sumter, and the other for the relief of Fort Pickered, but before the time for her departure, Fort Sumter was in the hands of the insurgents. How th[30 more...]<
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