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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 58 8 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 57 3 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 56 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 47 47 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 44 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 33 1 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 32 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 32 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) or search for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 5: events in Charleston and Charleston harbor in December, 1860.--the conspirators encouraged by the Government policy. (search)
ally, a report of the Committee on Military Affairs, of the House of Representatives, revealed some startling facts. According to that report, so early as the 29th of December, 1859, Secretary Floyd had ordered the transfer of sixty-five thousand percussion muskets, forty thousand muskets altered to percussion, and ten thousand percussion rifles, from the armory at Springfield in Massachusetts, and the arsenals at Watervliet in New York, and Watertown in Massachusetts, to the arsenals at Fayetteville in North Carolina, Charleston in South Carolina, Augusta in Georgia, Mount Vernon in Alabama, and Baton Rouge in Louisiana; and these were distributed during the spring of 1860. The distribution was as follows:--   percussion muskets. altered muskets. Rifles. To Charleston Arsenal 9,280 5,720 2,000 To Fayetteville Arsenal 15,480 9,520 2,000 To Augusta Arsenal 12,380 7,620 2,000 To Mount Vernon Arsenal 9,280 5,720 2,000 To Baton Rouge Arsenal 18,580 11,420 2,000  
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
t buildings and archives there. At the same time the conspirators, in several places, acting upon the counsel of those of South Carolina, began to plunder the National Government, by seizing its property in the name of certain States in which such property happened to be. Even in the loyal State of North Carolina, where there was no pretense of secession until four months later, May, 1861. the Governor, John W. Ellis, seized the forts within its borders, January 8. and the Arsenal at Fayetteville (into which Floyd had lately thrown seventeen thousand small arms, with accouterments and ammunition), under the pretext of securing them from occupation by mobs. He then wrote a letter to the President, telling him that if he (the Governor) could receive assurances that no troops would be sent to that State prior to the 4th of March (the day fixed upon by many as the one on which the first blow at the life of the Republic should be struck), then all would be peace and quiet there. If,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 15: siege of Fort Pickens.--Declaration of War.--the Virginia conspirators and, the proposed capture of Washington City. (search)
no harm should come nigh their dwellings, and perceiving war to be inevitable, were hastening to make the Border States the theater of its operations, and, if possible, secure the great advantage of the possession of the National Capital. At various points on his journey northward, Stephens had harangued the people, and everywhere he raised the cry of On to Washington! The New York Commercial Advertiser of April 25th had an account of the experience of a gentleman who had escaped from Fayetteville to avoid impressment into the insurgent army. He traveled on the same train with Stephens from Warsaw to Richmond. At nearly every station, he says, Stephens spoke. The capture of Washington was the grand idea which he enforced, and exhorted the people to join in the enterprise, to which they heartily responded. This was the only thing talked of. It must be done! was his constant exclamation. That cry was already resounding throughout the South. It was an echo or a paraphrase of t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 16: Secession of Virginia and North Carolina declared.--seizure of Harper's Ferry and Gosport Navy Yard.--the first troops in Washington for its defense. (search)
t an election awed by bayonets Senator Mason's letter, 384. North Carolina ruled by usurpers Ordinance of Secession adopted, 385. seizure of the Arsenal at Fayetteville mischievous work begins in Tennessee, 386. Tennessee leagued with the Confederacy, 387. usurpation and fraud in Tennessee, 388. designs against Harper's Fed seized, for the second time, the National forts on the sea-coast; See page 161. also the Mint at Charlotte, April 20, 2861. and the Government Arsenal at Fayetteville, April 23. in which were thirty-seven thousand stand of arms, three thousand kegs of gunpowder, and an immense amount of munitions of war. Within three weeks Arsenal at Fayetteville, North Carolina. after the passage of the Ordinance of Secession, there were not less than twenty thousand North Carolina volunteers under arms. They adopted a flag which was composed of the colors red, white, and blue, differently arranged from those in the National flag. The colors were arranged as