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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 340 340 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 202 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 177 51 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 142 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 131 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 130 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 128 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 89 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 82 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 73 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for St. Louis (Missouri, United States) or search for St. Louis (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
ing a customhouse at Neine's Landing, near the boundary between Mississippi and Tennessee, and the erection of other batteries, whose guns for more than two years obstructed the river-trade. That first steamer (A. O. Tyler) arrested at Vicksburg, was afterward converted into a national gunboat, and did good service in putting down the rebellion. The blockade at Vicksburg created intense exasperation among the navigators of the river, and threats of vengeance came down from Cincinnati and St. Louis. Cincinnati steamboat men have been thrown into a fever, from the Governor of Mississippi ordering cannon and a military company to Vicksburg, to hail all steamboats passing. The Abolition journals of Cincinnati howl over it, and are greatly Incensed. We would like to see them help themselves. --Memphis Evening Argus, January 17, 1861. Measures were taken by the Convention, and by the Legislature, which had reassembled, in order to give force to the Ordinance of Secession, to incr
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 15: siege of Fort Pickens.--Declaration of War.--the Virginia conspirators and, the proposed capture of Washington City. (search)
e was pressed into the Confederate service, in which he remained, at that place, until it was taken possession of in May, 1862. The re-enforcement of Fort Pickens was performed as follows:--Early in the evening the marines of the Scbine and St. Louis, under Lieutenant Cash, were sent on board the Brooklyn, Captain Walker, when she weighed anchor and ran in as near to Fort Pickens as possible. Launches were lowered, and marines, with Captain Vogdes's artillerymen, immediately embarked, The d into the harbor, and under the guns of Forts McRee and Barrancas, unobserved. The whole expedition was in charge of Commander Charles H. Poor, assisted by Lieutenants Smith, of the Brooklyn, Lew and Newman, of the Sabine, and Belknap, of the St. Louis. The insurgents, in endeavoring to conceal their own movements, had assisted in obscuring those of the squadron, by extinguishing the lamp of the light-house. In the thick darkness, the expedition struck the designated landing-place with great
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 17: events in and near the National Capital. (search)
e thousand muskets and a complement of ammunition, he directed him to send a judicious officer, with four or five companies, to take possession of the Arsenal at St. Louis, which he believed to be in danger of seizure by the secessionists of Missouri. He also telegraphed to Frank P. Blair, of St. Louis (afterward a major-general iSt. Louis (afterward a major-general in the National Army), to assist in the matter. By judicious management, twenty-one thousand stand of small arms, two field-pieces, and one hundred and ten thousand rounds of ammunition were transferred from St. Louis to Illinois. Wool also ordered heavy cannon, carriages, et coetera, to Cairo, Illinois, which speedily became a plSt. Louis to Illinois. Wool also ordered heavy cannon, carriages, et coetera, to Cairo, Illinois, which speedily became a place of great interest, in a military point of view. He authorized the Governors of New Hampshire and Massachusetts to put the coast defenses within the borders of their respective States in good order, and approved of other measures proposed for the defense of the seaport towns supposed to be in danger from the pirate vessels of t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 19: events in the Mississippi Valley.--the Indians. (search)
session the Missouri Convention adjourned to St. Louis, where it reassembled on the 4th of March, on when it should adjourn. The atmosphere of St. Louis, in and out of the Convention, was not conge338. The Missouri Republicans a newspaper in St. Louis, which was regarded as the exponent of the d be, for all his worldly wealth lies here in St. Louis (and it is very large); and then, again, hisdent's call for troops, the secessionists of St. Louis held secret meetings in the Bethold Mansion,e of the United States the loyal citizens of St. Louis, in number not exceeding ten thousand. Thishot and shell in barrels, had been landed at St. Louis from the steamer J. C. Swan, and taken to Caiet was soon afterward restored. the city of St. Louis (which remained under Union control) was spa preparations for securing its capital city, St. Louis, from the armed occupation of the insurgents is one hundred and seventy-five miles below St. Louis. It is situated on a boot-shaped peninsula,[21 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 23: the War in Missouri.-doings of the Confederate Congress. --Affairs in Baltimore.--Piracies. (search)
sharp conflict for the control of the State, early in May. The first substantial victory of the former had been won at St. Louis, in the loyal action of the State Convention, See page 461. and in the seizure of Camp Jackson ; See page 468. an Volunteers, under Colonel (afterward General) Franz Sigel, to occupy and protect from injury the Pacific Railway, from St. Louis to the Gasconade River, preparatory to an advance toward the southern portion of the State, by way of Rolla, to oppose dred men, and was marching, with rapidly increasing numbers, on Springfield. On the following day, June 13. Lyon left St. Louis in two river steamers (Iatan and J. C. Swan), with about two thousand men well supplied for a long march, their immedianing south from Booneville to the Arkansas border, thus giving to the Government the control of the important points of St. Louis, Hannibal, St. Joseph, and Bird's Point, as bases of operations, with railways and rivers for transportation. On the 1