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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 2: preliminary rebellious movements. (search)
d the destruction of Slavery, upon which, they alleged, had rested in the past, and must forever rest in the future, all substantial prosperity in the cotton-growing States. They held the Republican party responsible for John Brown's acts at Harper's Ferry, For the purpose of liberating the slaves of Virginia, John Brown, an enthusiast, with a few followers, seized Harper's Ferry, at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers, in October, 1859, as a base. of operations. He failed.Harper's Ferry, at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers, in October, 1859, as a base. of operations. He failed. He was arrested by National and Virginia troops, and was hanged, in December following, by the authorities of Virginia. and declared that his raid was the forerunner of a general and destructive invasion of the Slavelabor States by the fanatical hordes of the North. They cited the publications and speeches of the Abolitionists of the North during the past thirty years; the legislation in the same section unfriendly to slavery; and the more recent utterances of leading members of the Republica
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 4: seditious movements in Congress.--Secession in South Carolina, and its effects. (search)
irginians of the coincidence of the people of the two States in long cherishing sentiments of disunion. He pointed to their public acts relative to meditated revolt, under certain contingencies. See resolutions of the General Assembly of Virginia, in March, 1847, concerning the measure known as the Wilmot Proviso, in relation to Slavery in the region just taken from Mexico. He reminded them of the dangers which had just menaced their State by the raid of John Brown and twenty men, at Harper's Ferry, of the implacable condition of Northern opinion concerning Slavery; and the rapid increase of Abolition sentiment in the Free-labor States. He reminded them that the South had a right to demand the repeal of all laws hurtful to Slavery; the disbanding of every society which was agitating the Northern mind against Southern institutions ; and the surrender of the power to amend the Constitution in regard to Slavery, after it should be amended so as to nationalize the system. He made an
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 6: Affairs at the National Capital.--War commenced in Charleston harbor. (search)
etween Maryland and Virginia, and, these two States agreeing, let them provide sufficient force to seize the city of Washington, and if coercion is to be. attempted, let it begin with subjugating the States of Maryland and Virginia. Thus practical and efficient fighting in the Union will prevent the powers of the Union from falling into the hands of our enemies. We hope Virginia will depute her commissioners to Maryland first, and, providing for the seizure of Washington and Old Point, Harper's Ferry and Gosport Navy Yard, present these two States in the attitude of rebels inviting coercion. This was the way Patrick Henry brought about the Revolution, and this is the best use that Virginia can make of commissioners of any kind. Governor Wise had already publicly announced that, in the event of an attempt at coercion on the part of the National Government, Fortress Monroe, the Navy Yard at Gosport, and the armory and arsenal at Harper's Ferry would be seized, and held for the purp
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 14: the great Uprising of the people. (search)
uence. That city had been regarded as eminently conservative and friendly to the South, on account of the many ties of commercial interest. Politically it was opposed to the Administration by thirty thousand majority. The The Battery, New York, in May, 1861. voice of the metropolis, at such a crisis was therefore listened for with the most anxious solicitude. It could not keep silence. Already the insurgents had commenced their movements for the seizure of the seat of Government. Harper's Ferry and the Gosport Navy Yard were just passing into the hands of rebellious men. Already the blood of Union soldiers had been spilt in Baltimore, and the cry had come up from below the Roanoke: Press on toward Washington! Already the politicians of Virginia had passed an Ordinance of Secession, April 17. and were inviting the troops from the Gulf States to their soil. The secessionists of Maryland were active, and the National Capitol, with its archives, was in imminent peril of seizure
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 15: siege of Fort Pickens.--Declaration of War.--the Virginia conspirators and, the proposed capture of Washington City. (search)
aid, he continued. I therefore request you to furnish one regiment of infantry without delay, to rendezvous at Harper's Ferry, Virginia. It must consist of ten companies, of not less than sixty-four men each. . . . They will be mustered into the service of the Confederate States at Harper's Ferry. The object of this call to Harper's Ferry will be apparent presently. Virginia, at this time, was in a state of great agitation. Its Convention had passed through a stormy session, extending frHarper's Ferry will be apparent presently. Virginia, at this time, was in a state of great agitation. Its Convention had passed through a stormy session, extending from the middle of February to the middle of April. It was held in the city of Richmond, and was organized February 13, 1861. by the appointment of John Janney, of Loudon, as its President, and John L. Eubank, Clerk. In his address on taking the chan injunction of secrecy, they set on foot, doubtless under directions from Montgomery, expeditions for the capture of Harper's Ferry and of the Navy Yard near Norfolk, preparatory to an attempt to seize Washington City. A few days afterward, Alexa
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 16: Secession of Virginia and North Carolina declared.--seizure of Harper's Ferry and Gosport Navy Yard.--the first troops in Washington for its defense. (search)
a and North Carolina declared.--seizure of Harper's Ferry and Gosport Navy Yard.--the first troops iainst Harper's Ferry, 390. destruction at Harper's Ferry, 391. the Navy Yard and vessels at Gosporits vast amount of ordnance and stores. Harper's Ferry is a small village in Jefferson County, Vif the post. Profound quiet prevailed at Harper's Ferry until after the attack on Fort Sumter, whe the 18th of April, orders were received Harper's Ferry in May, 1861. this is a view of Harper'lf way between Charlestown Court House and Harper's Ferry, and four miles from each. Other troops, , to Lieutenant Jones, April 22, 1861. Harper's Ferry instantly became an important post, menacienced a little earlier than the march upon Harper's Ferry. So early as the night of the 16th of Aprohn E. Wool. By obtaining possession of Harper's Ferry and the Gosport Navy Yard, the most importe Government to arm them with muskets from Harper's Ferry, but the armory there was destroyed that v[4 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 17: events in and near the National Capital. (search)
guaranties, that no National troops, nor any munitions of war from the Armory and Arsenal at Harper's Ferry, should be permitted to pass over their road. They accompanied their demand with a threat that, if it should be refused, the great railway bridge over the Potomac at Harper's Ferry should be destroyed. They had heard of the uprising of the loyal people of the great Northwest, and the movemtelligence came at an early hour of the evacuation and destruction of the public property at Harper's Ferry, on the previous evening. The secessionists were exasperated and the Unionists were jubilane, excepting the one that kept the conspirators in communication with Richmond by the way of Harper's Ferry. Thus, all communication by railway or telegraph between the seat of government and the loyo some guests — true men — at Willard's Hotel, that a large body of Virginians were to seize Harper's Ferry and its munitions of war, and the rolling stock of the Baltimore and Ohio Railway, that even
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 18: the Capital secured.--Maryland secessionists Subdued.--contributions by the people. (search)
the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment, when on its way to the insurgent camp at Harper's Ferry, and was placed in position to guard the viaduct over the Patuxent of the W hold it, so as to cut the secessionists off from facile communication with Harper's Ferry. It was granted. He then inquired, what were the powers of a General comm in 1864. over the Patapsco Valley, and the roads leading to Baltimore and Harper's Ferry. General Butler accompanied the troops, and established a camp on the hillso above the viaduct toward Ellicott's mills, up which passes the railway to Harper's Ferry, and the expanding valley and beautifully rolling country below the viaductmore, prevent armed insurgents from going to join those already in force at Harper's Ferry, and to look after a large quantity of gunpowder said to be stored in a chulonging to the General and his staff, were on a train of cars headed toward Harper's Ferry. Before this train was a short one, bearing fifty men, who were ordered up
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 20: commencement of civil War. (search)
overnment at Washington. he designated no less than twenty places in the State as points of rendezvous for the militia. One-fourth of these places were westward of the mountains. At the same time the insurgents strengthened the garrison at Harper's Ferry, and erected batteries on the Virginia bank of the Potomac, below Washington, for the purpose of obstructing the navigation of that stream, and preventing supplies for the army near the Capital being borne upon its waters. This speedily led which included Western Virginia. He was now ordered to cross the Ohio River with the troops under his charge, and, in conjunction with those under Colonel Kelley and others in Virginia, drive out the Confederate forces there, and advance on Harper's Ferry. He visited Indianapolis on the 24th of May, and reviewed the brigade of Indianians who were at Camp Morton, under Brigadier-General T. A. Morris. In a brief speech at the Bates House, he assured the assembled thousands that Indiana troops
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 21: beginning of the War in Southeastern Virginia. (search)
earnest desire for duty in the field, and it was delighted by an order issued on the 6th of June, by the General-in-chief, to proceed by rail to Cumberland, Maryland, and report to Major-General Patterson, then moving from Pennsylvania toward Harper's Ferry, where the insurgents were in strong force under General Joseph E. Johnston. This order was the result of the urgent importunities of Colonel Wallace and his friends, to allow his fine regiment an opportunity for active duties. During the f This dash on the insurgents at Romney had a salutary effect. It inspirited the loyal people in that region, thrilled the whole country with joy, and, according to the Richmond newspapers, so alarmed Johnston by its boldness, and its menaces of his line of communication with Richmond, and Manassas (for he believed these troops to be the advance of a much larger force), that he forthwith evacuated Harper's Ferry, and moved up the Valley to a point nearer Winchester. Tail-piece — Knapsac
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