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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 7 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
on's feeble health, General Sherman was placed in chief command of the Department of the Cumberland (which included the States of Kentucky and Tennessee) early in October, when, with a forecast not then appreciated, he declared that an army of two hundred thousand men would be necessary to expel the Confederates from Kentucky and Tequipped blooded bay horses. Each man was armed with two of Colt's six-barrel navy revolvers, one five-barrel rifle, and a saber. had arrived there on the 16th, October. after encountering a severe rain storm. General Sigel, who led the advance, had already crossed his force over the rapidly swelling stream by means of a single uard was only 17. So Zagonyi said in a letter to Mrs. Fremont, October 26, 1861. The action had lasted an hour and a half; and in the dim twilight of that bright October evening, the National flag was raised in triumph over the court-house. At a little past midnight, Zagonyi, with a captured Confederate flag and only seventy of
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 4: military operations in Western Virginia, and on the sea-coast (search)
d Floyd; but the concentration of all the forces under Lee prevented any ill consequences. Reynolds now resolved to act on the offensive. At the beginning of October he moved with about five thousand men upon Jackson's intrenched camp, on the Greenbrier, near a noted tavern, called Travelers' repose, on the Staunton pike. His letter of resignation. note 8. page 421, volume I. Floyd and Rosecrans were once more competitors for the possession of the Kanawha Valley. The former, late in October, took position on the left bank of New River, and erected batteries there a little above its junction with the Gauley, and on the first of November he opened an ans, and their success was perfect, said an account of the affair written by an officer at the Navy Yard. The Confederates soon became the aggressors. Early in October, they made an attempt to surprise and capture Wilson's troops on Santa Rosa Island. About fourteen hundred picked men, chosen mostly from Georgia troops and from
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
n's life was saved. 149. Hampton Roads presented a spectacle, in October, similar to that, late in August, of the Hatteras expedition; but o far matured an expedition for the Southern coast, that, early in October, rumors of it began to attract public attention. It became tangibe troops, left Hampton Roads and proceeded to sea on a most lovely October morning, Oct. 29, 1861. having been summoned to the movement at dnization of the Army of the Potomac was perfected at the middle of October, when at least seventy-five thousand well-armed and fairly disciplfere with the Confederates in their mischievous work, and early in October Captain Craven officially announced that the navigation of the Potre made on the line of the Potomac River as the beautiful month of October was passing away. At that time Major-General Banks was in command battle. McCall had made a reconnoissance on Sunday, the 20th, October. which had evidently caused an opposing movement on the part of th
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 14: movements of the Army of the Potomac.--the Monitor and Merrimack. (search)
or obtaining correct information, had satisfied himself, and had so reported, that not one-half that number of Confederate soldiers were in all Virginia. It was afterward clearly shown that General Wool's estimate was not too low, and that from October to March, Johnston never had an effective force of more than 40,000 under his orders, and that his preparations for an evacuation were begun as early as October, 1861; and that, after that time, he lay simply in observation. So declared W. H. Hf the campaign in Western Virginia, recorded in Chapter IV. Early in January, the gallant and accomplished General Lander, who was suffering from a wound received in a skirmish at Edwards's Ferry, a few days after the battle of Ball's Bluff, in October, took command of a force to protect the Baltimore and Ohio Railway. He had a wily and energetic opponent in Stonewall Jackson, who was endeavoring to gain what Floyd, and Wise, and Lee had lost, and to hold possession of the Shenandoah Valley.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 18: Lee's invasion of Maryland, and his retreat toward Richmond. (search)
ust have a nucleus of 6,000 picked troops. I have not so many; yet I have destroyed three armies, captured 40,000 prisoners, taken 200 pieces of artillery, and thrice saved the capital. The enemy are in full flight upon Troyes? Be before them. Act no longer as of late. Resume the method and spirit of ‘98. When Frenchmen see your plume waving in the van, and you, first of all, exposed to the enemy's fire, you will do with them whatever you will. At length, when the beautiful month of October, during which the roads were perfect, had nearly passed by, and Lee's army was thoroughly rested, supplied, re-enforced, and his communications with Richmond were re-established, McClellan's advance began to cross the Potomac, on a pontoon-bridge at Berlin, Oct. 26, 1862. and on the 2d of November he announced that his whole army was once more in Virginia, prepared to move southward on the east side of the Blue Ridge, instead of pursuing Lee up the Shenandoah Valley; on its western side.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
ng the sketches herewith given, we returned to Iuka, and the next morning the writer journeyed toward Nashville. Corinth, where stirring events occurred at the close of May, See page 293. became the theater of more stirring events early in October. Rosecrans arrived there from Iuka on the 26th of September, and prepared to meet an expected attack upon the post by the combined armies of Price and Van Dorn. Ord, as we have seen, returned to Bolivar. Grant made his Headquarters at Jackson any emergency. His cavalry--the eyes of the army, as Rosecrans called them — were on the alert in every direction, and troops were thrown out toward the foe, to meet his advance. Skirmishing ensued, but it was not until the morning of the 3d October. that Rosecrans felt assured that Corinth was Van Dorn's objective. Then, before dawn, he disposed his troops to meet him. Hamilton's division formed the right, Davies's the center, and McKean's the left; and a brigade of three regiments, under
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
is kind was to repossess the rich district of La Fourche, on the west side of the Mississippi, and for that purpose he sent the gallant Weitzel, .then a brigadier-general, with a brigade of infantry, with artillery and Barnet's cavalry. Late in October, Weitzel landed at Donaldsonville, and traversed the region in its rear and south of it with very little difficulty, after a sharp fight near Labadieville on the 27th. October. The Confederates, under McPheeters, were there on both sides of theOctober. The Confederates, under McPheeters, were there on both sides of the Bayou La Fourche, with six pieces of artillery. Weitzel brought up his cannon and moved to the attack, with the Thirteenth Connecticut and Seventy-fifth New York in advance. A battle was soon opened, in which the Eighth New Hampshire and Twelfth Connecticut gallantly co-operated with the other two regiments. The batteries of Thompson and Carruth did eminent service. The Confederates were driven and pursued about four miles. Weitzel lost eighteen killed and seventy-four wounded. He captured