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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Cornfield Point (Maryland, United States) or search for Cornfield Point (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 18: Lee's invasion of Maryland, and his retreat toward Richmond. (search)
d Martinsburg, destroying the Baltimore and Ohio railroad much of the way, with Stuart lingering on his rear to cover that retreat, and to deceive McClellan by a show of numbers and vigor. Stuart recrossed the river at Williamsport on the same day, when he was driven back by General Couch with a heavy force of all arms. McClellan then sent General Williams to retake Maryland Heights; and two days later Sept. 22. General Sumner occupied Harper's Ferry, and threw pontoon bridges across the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers at that place. Lee rested a few days, and then moved leisurely up the Shenandoah Valley to the vicinity of Bunker's Hill and Winchester, breaking up the railway much of the distance between the latter place and Harper's Ferry. McClellan, meanwhile, had begun to call for re-enforcements and supplies, as prerequisites to a pursuit. His disorganized army needed re-organization. His cavalry force was greatly weakened by casualties in battle, fatigues, and a distemper